Patreon button  Steam curated reviews  Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | AND | IOS | PC | PS4 | NS | VITA | WIIU | XB1 | All

Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by overdrive and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
The Elder Scrolls IV: Knights of the Nine (Xbox 360)

The Elder Scrolls IV: Knights of the Nine review (X360)

Reviewed on May 28, 2013

In the priory basement is an enchanted pedestal which will convert this equipment into stronger versions as you increase in level. Since many rewards in this game are based on your level when you earn them, having stuff that will grow with you instead of simply becoming obsolete is a very nice touch.
Fuzzical Fighter (NES)

Fuzzical Fighter review (NES)

Reviewed on May 26, 2013

Perhaps these two genres just weren't meant to be mashed together and that’s why they wound up feeling as compatible as the typical Hollywood relationship.
Vay (Sega CD)

Vay review (SCD)

Reviewed on May 11, 2013

And then, right in the middle of all of that are light-hearted elements such as a horribly flatulent fairy who propels you across an ocean with her gas, a random encounter bull-man called "Retardotaur" and random townspeople who break the fourth wall to remind you that you're playing a video game. Wacky stuff like this works in a game like EarthBound, because most of that game has a somewhat whimsical outlook on things. With Vay, it's just distracting nonsense, like if Hamlet took a pie to the face while staring at Ophelia's body.
Captain Commando (SNES)

Captain Commando review (SNES)

Reviewed on May 04, 2013

Not only was blood removed from the game, but the boss named "Blood" got his name changed to the less-intimidating "Boots" (to reflect his kick-heavy offense).
Willow (NES)

Willow review (NES)

Reviewed on April 27, 2013

When you get to a town, count on walking through about 20 screens to find the five or so homes that you can actually enter to find information, items or a place to rest. Midway through the game, when you have to scale a pair of towers, enjoy seeing the same few screens as you ascend each one's multiple, identical floors.
Dead Moon (TurboGrafx-16)

Dead Moon review (TG16)

Reviewed on April 13, 2013

In Dead Moon, only during boss fights, your ship turns around and faces left once you reach the screen’s right edge. You’ll feel like you're in an actual arena, struggling to survive a battle with a true rival. The game makes full use of this mechanic, too; bosses will fly all over the screen, forcing you to constantly remain on the move in order to stay alive.
Abadox (NES)

Abadox review (NES)

Reviewed on April 09, 2013

When you resume play, you'll find yourself again controlling that same slow-moving, impotent piece of junk with which you started. The big difference is that now you'll possibly be starting from a mid-level checkpoint or even a more difficult late-game area. Odds are that you'll quickly lose the rest of your lives and realize that you're playing one of those shooters where, if you can't complete it on one life, you might as well reset and start again from scratch.
Bloody Warriors: Shango no Gyakushuu (NES)

Bloody Warriors: Shango no Gyakushuu review (NES)

Reviewed on March 16, 2013

Bloody Warriors is best described as an RPG for RPG junkies. It's not good enough to inspire players to delve into the genre, but diehard fans like me are able to gain some enjoyment from taking another trip down a well-worn path.
Romancing SaGa 3 (SNES)

Romancing SaGa 3 review (SNES)

Reviewed on March 07, 2013

Magic is generally bought in stores. At least I think it is… I never found much use for casting spells when I could use high-tier skills to erase thousands of hit points from enemies in a single attack. Since you regain all health after each battle, it's not like healing spells are all that useful, and characters tend to have 10 or more life points, which means they can fall that many times in battles before actually perishing. Thus, fights tend to be onslaughts of all-out offense until all the monsters are dead.
Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars (SNES)

Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars review (SNES)

Reviewed on February 22, 2013

Some of the things which make combat so easy also add to its charm, because they make fights far more interactive than one would expect from a turn-based RPG. While tapping the attack button at the proper time during a character's turn will essentially make every blow they land a critical hit, it also adds to the fun, as this is one game where you won't be mindlessly tapping the attack button.
Dragon Quest VI: Maboroshi no Daichi (SNES)

Dragon Quest VI: Maboroshi no Daichi review (SNES)

Reviewed on February 17, 2013

And most importantly: once upon a time, three brave heroes advanced upon the castle of the fierce demon lord Mudo in an attempt to bring his reign of terror to an end. The foul beast was prepared, though, and cast a horrible spell that caused the heroic party members to be frozen momentarily in air before finally vanishing. In a bed in a remote village, the leader of the brave triumvirate wakes up… to what apparently is the same boring, rustic life he always has lived.
Salamander (TurboGrafx-16)

Salamander review (TG16)

Reviewed on February 02, 2013

Sadly, Salamander is a rarity — a Gradius-style game that doesn't operate by these rules. Instead, you get the simple-n-generic sort of system where enemies drop power-ups represented by various icons and, by collecting them, you automatically get whatever goodie they represent. This takes some of the fun out of this title, as the ability to customize the way you power up your ship was quite a nice touch.
Secret of Mana (SNES)

Secret of Mana review (SNES)

Reviewed on January 25, 2013

The farther you advance into the adventure, the more worthless the hero becomes when compared to his two companions. He is the best melee fighter, which is great for mowing through the common enemies that reside on the paths your party must navigate while traversing the overworld and any dungeons, but he possesses no magic of his own. When left to fight alone, the best the hero can do is charge up his weapon of choice (which isn't the quickest of processes) and hope to connect with an enemy by unleashing an enhanced attack.
Gradius II: Gofer no Yabou (NES)

Gradius II: Gofer no Yabou review (NES)

Reviewed on January 12, 2013

In Gradius II, you are immediately greeted by the choice between four different weapon sets (as opposed to only one in the original) and then you advance to a very attractive opening stage loaded with fiery asteroids. Making this level particularly neat is the way you can scroll up and down while moving to the right. If the particular path you're charting through the asteroids seems too fraught with danger, it's simplicity itself to go over one instead of under it in order to fight a different arrangement of foes.
EarthBound (SNES)

EarthBound review (SNES)

Reviewed on December 30, 2012

At seemingly random moments, a man will descend from the sky to take a photograph of your party before vanishing the way he came. One NPC's desire to create a memorable dungeon leads to him changing his body into one. This is one of those games that can be difficult to put down simply because you'll want to experience the next bizarre situation.
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (SNES)

Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest review (SNES)

Reviewed on December 08, 2012

First, a company comes out with a game that has potential and is terrific in some aspects, but it lacks a bit overall. In the case of Rare's Donkey Kong Country, the Super Nintendo played host to an absolutely gorgeous platformer that just didn't live up to the (admittedly very high) standard set for that system by Super Mario World. It was solid and it tended to be enjoyable, but no new ground was broken and things could get repetitive. It seemed to be the ultimate in playing it safe — a game that could have come with a disclaimer: "You've done all this before, but it's never looked this good… has it?!" With Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest, it's safe to say that Rare’s developers were through with the whole "testing the waters" phase, as they not only improved on the original, but managed to create one of the top platformers I've ever played.
The Battle of Olympus (NES)

The Battle of Olympus review (NES)

Reviewed on November 22, 2012

Pay a visit to the island maze-fortress of Crete and the minute you step in the door, you'll be cut to shreds by various Amazon warriors who are both durable and capable of moving their shields around to block attacks much like The Adventures of Link's Ironknuckles. And I haven't even mentioned Phrygia's MANY snake-dragons that take more damage than most bosses while blasting the crap out of you with fire. Brutal…
Fallout 3: Game of the Year Edition (Xbox 360)

Fallout 3: Game of the Year Edition review (X360)

Reviewed on November 17, 2012

When my questing first took me here, I admit that it didn't take long for me to get lost, as I wasn't really paying that much attention to the in-game map. D.C. is essentially a world unto itself. A confusing, labyrinthine world with many twists, turns and dead ends. Words can't say how welcome this place was, especially when you consider the rest of the game's world takes place in a pretty unappealing place.
Zoda's Revenge: Star Tropics 2 (NES)

Zoda's Revenge: Star Tropics 2 review (NES)

Reviewed on October 29, 2012

The original StarTropics was mostly confined to a random series of tropical islands, and everything blended together after a while. In Zoda's Revenge, you control Mike Jones as he travels from a prehistoric land, to ancient Egypt, to other areas such as a Transylvanian castle and King Arthur's Britain. Each chapter contains a minimum of one dungeon to explore as you search for a collection of Tetris -style blocks known as Tetrads. You need to reach them before various incarnations of Zoda (the villain from the first StarTropics game) can harness their power for evil.
ActRaiser (SNES)

ActRaiser review (SNES)

Reviewed on October 26, 2012

While it doesn't take much reading between the lines for a person to at least grasp the fundamentals of this, Nintendo's censorship did take away some of the impact this sort of plot might have, leaving us with the sort of standard fantasy fare where you'd almost expect there to be a disclaimer in the credits stating that any resemblance to actual belief systems is purely coincidental.

Additional Results (20 per page)

[001] [002] [003] [004] [005] [006] [007] [008] [009] [010] [011] [012] [013] [014] [015] [016] [017] [018] [019] [020] [021] [022] [023] [024] [025]

Policies/Ethics | Contact | Advertise | Sponsor Guide | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2018 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.