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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Duck Tales 2 (NES)

Duck Tales 2 review (NES)

Reviewed on August 06, 2012

A lot of the challenge this time around comes from bottomless pits. The first game generally placed you in a relatively safe environment where you would typically die only if you ventured too far off the beaten path in search of treasure, or if you let enemies knock you around a bit too much. There were occasional hazards that spelled instant death, certainly, but levels were designed in a manner that welcomed newcomers.
Tony Hawk's Pro Skater HD (Xbox 360)

Tony Hawk's Pro Skater HD review (X360)

Reviewed on August 05, 2012

However, the revised game brings some new problems of its own. The main thing I’ve noticed is that the physics system seems to have been tweaked. I’m not sure how much of it is my memory playing tricks on me and how much of it is genuinely different, but either way I can’t say that I like it. Bails were never especially realistic, but here they’re annoying to an extent that would be almost comical if it weren’t so exasperating.
Theatrhythm Final Fantasy (3DS)

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy review (3DS)

Reviewed on July 05, 2012

The varying rules from one mode to the next can seem overwhelming at first, but the differences are actually rather minor and you’ll adapt to everything quickly enough. The biggest difference is actually the differing background imagery. Battle Music places you in a combat scenario that looks like it was pulled from one of the first nine games, with your characters on the right side of the screen and enemies appearing to the left.
Shatterhand (NES)

Shatterhand review (NES)

Reviewed on July 01, 2012

You might suppose that in a game where you’re supposed to wail on everything with powerful fists, your enemies would attack in a manner that encourages brawls. However, your foes often fire potshots at you from a significant distance. You’ll almost never meet an enemy that is an easy target for your fists, so instead you’ll spend a lot of time slowly sneaking forward while leaping or ducking to avoid projectiles. It slows everything to a crawl at the best of times, while in other instances you’re pretty much screwed until you memorize the layout of a level.
Whomp 'Em (NES)

Whomp 'Em review (NES)

Reviewed on June 28, 2012

Another potential issue is that Whomp ‘Em plays a lot like an old Mega Man title, except that the pacing for the stages doesn’t feel quite as refined as it did in Capcom’s famous series. You can clear the six main stages (after a brief introductory stage) in any order you like, usually after spending only a few minutes in each of them. You’ll even gain special weapons when you emerge victorious.
The Flintstones: The Treasure of Sierra Madrock (SNES)

The Flintstones: The Treasure of Sierra Madrock review (SNES)

Reviewed on June 27, 2012

Fortunately, the action levels that make up the bulk of the game are reasonably good. There’s not a lot of visual variety because each of the stages are themed, but you’ll see grasslands, volcanic areas, icy crags, a dense jungle and a series of dank caverns. The time limit is often every bit as much your enemy as the various animals that try to make life difficult for you.
Mario Tennis Open (3DS)

Mario Tennis Open review (3DS)

Reviewed on May 30, 2012

While you play, your view of the action shifts between two perspectives depending on how you hold the 3DS. If you hold the system in a roughly vertical position, the 3D effect is eliminated and the action is presented from a perspective that lies low against the court, almost behind the players. This allows you to aim serves by swinging the unit left or right. If you hold the system horizontally in your lap, the 3D effect returns.
Atelier Meruru: The Apprentice of Arland (PlayStation 3)

Atelier Meruru: The Apprentice of Arland review (PS3)

Reviewed on May 26, 2012

There’s an astonishing level of complexity on display everywhere you turn, so you might have to wait until your second or third trip through the game before trying to actually hunt down some of the more fearsome monsters. Even then, with the benefit of gear that you are allowed to carry over from one round to the next, failure is possible and perhaps even likely. There’s a bunch of awesome stuff to do and see but not nearly enough time.
Revenge of the Titans (PC)

Revenge of the Titans review (PC)

Reviewed on May 11, 2012

Compounding that particular issue is the fact that it’s difficult to see very far. The perspective is close enough to the ground that you can easily see detail around each building and your base, but to see the whole level you’ll need to use the keyboard keys or the mouse to scroll. This adds nothing useful to the experience and seems to exist mostly as a cheap means of adding difficulty.
Little King's Story (Wii)

Little King's Story review (WII)

Reviewed on April 01, 2012

Your royal guard has a tendency to get caught up on fences, on the edge of buildings and so forth. By the time you’re commanding a group of 17 soldiers, it’s all but impossible to make everyone climb a simple staircase without cautious preparation. Such issues also cropped up in games like Pikmin and Overlord, but here their impact on moment-to-moment gameplay is more severe.
Ridge Racer (Vita)

Ridge Racer review (VITA)

Reviewed on March 15, 2012

In Ridge Racer, though, none of the tracks—even the two bonus ones—include more than a few corners that you might call “sharp.” Old Town, one of the added tracks, includes a single ‘S’ curve near its conclusion that is an example of the sort of thing that should have been more common throughout the game.
Wario Land: Shake It! (Wii)

Wario Land: Shake It! review (WII)

Reviewed on March 06, 2012

You have to take leaps of faith and frequently you must also deal with sloppy controls (since you’ll be using devices that enhance your speed in many cases). If you happen to time a jump wrong or if you start along the incorrect route, you’ll miss out on some nice rewards. In essence, the game penalizes you for not knowing ahead of time where everything is located.
Hyperdimension Neptunia mk2 (PlayStation 3)

Hyperdimension Neptunia mk2 review (PS3)

Reviewed on March 05, 2012

Hyperdimension Neptunia mk2 progresses in a simple pattern: you travel to a new land, witness events in its main town, then outlying areas appear and you explore them. Typically, you’ll slay a monster in a new area, go back to town and witness another event, then return to the same area again so that you can slay a second monster. Every so often, a new area unlocks and the process repeats as you gradually work through the game’s plot.
Rayman Origins (Vita)

Rayman Origins review (VITA)

Reviewed on February 20, 2012

On the Vita’s OLED screen in particular, colors are surprisingly vibrant. Rayman is animated beautifully and so are his enemies, but the backgrounds are truly something to behold. Screenshots don’t do them justice. They often resemble the most beautiful backdrops from the most beloved of Disney animated features.
Little Deviants (Vita)

Little Deviants review (VITA)

Reviewed on February 18, 2012

Little Deviants could have been a decent game, even without a multi-player component, but the mini-games are often challenging because of their imprecise controls, not thanks to designer ingenuity. It’s difficult to forget that most of what you find here wouldn’t be nearly as difficult if it used the available analog stick rather than forcing you to play around with the Vita’s more unique features.
Michael Jackson: The Experience HD (Vita)

Michael Jackson: The Experience HD review (VITA)

Reviewed on February 16, 2012

While Michael Jackson: The Experience HD is an engaging experience as far as it goes, there’s just not enough of it. Anyone who is happy that there are only 15 songs probably shouldn’t be buying the game in the first place, and fans who totally dig what Ubisoft has done here will probably wish for two or three times the number of selections.
The Simpsons Arcade Game (Xbox 360)

The Simpsons Arcade Game review (X360)

Reviewed on February 04, 2012

Certainly, you’ll see a large number of recycled goons, but the variety is still impressive considering the game’s era. There are pot-bellied businessmen, women with afros, ninja warriors, ghosts and lanky janitors, among others. New stages always have a new threat or two, and even familiar adversaries will mix things up by bringing weapons to the brawl. You can do the same thing yourself.
Pushmo (3DS)

Pushmo review (3DS)

Reviewed on January 31, 2012

Like Mario in Donkey Kong the hero can leap only a short distance, so a lot of pulling is necessary if he’s going to scale some of the larger puzzles. It starts to feel almost like you’re building your own platformer as you go, which could easily become frustrating except that you can undo the last 15 seconds or so of play by holding the L button to rewind your actions, as in a Prince of Persia title.
Unstoppable Gorg (PC)

Unstoppable Gorg review (PC)

Reviewed on January 19, 2012

Unstoppable Gorg is a tower defense game with a twist. That’s a claim that any PR person might make about any new offering within the genre. In this case, though, it’s an especially apt description because the twist is this: you twist things.
Skylanders: Spyro's Adventure (Xbox 360)

Skylanders: Spyro's Adventure review (X360)

Reviewed on January 09, 2012

Levels feature lots of loot and they all contain special areas that are locked behind gates. To enter gates, you must have a character with the matching affinity. As long as you have such a character and he hasn’t been disabled for that stage, you can simply pull the current character off the pedestal and replace it with a new one. The whole process takes mere seconds and it lets you feel like you’re actively involved in the adventure.

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