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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Mini Ninjas (Xbox 360)

Mini Ninjas review (X360)

Reviewed on September 26, 2009

When there's something to do, which is much of the time, Mini Ninjas can be a lot of fun just because of the number of offensive options that it provides.
The Beatles: Rock Band (PlayStation 3)

The Beatles: Rock Band review (PS3)

Reviewed on September 22, 2009

Harmonix has produced a finely-tuned release that falls in line with the best of its work to date. There are several elements that help this newest effort to stand apart from the Guitar Hero franchise.
Guitar Hero 5 (PlayStation 3)

Guitar Hero 5 review (PS3)

Reviewed on September 20, 2009

Unless you're the sort that isn't happy with anything but indie music, Guitar Hero 5 probably has more than a few selections that will appeal to your inner rock star. Some of the bands appearing here are new arrivals and some aren't, yet the songs included feel so perfect that I could scarcely believe they hadn't already been claimed by previous installments in the series.
Section 8 (Xbox 360)

Section 8 review (X360)

Reviewed on September 16, 2009

Fortunately, multi-player matches go a long way toward redeeming the game. Maps might have been a disaster when you were wandering across them to satisfy a few repetitive objectives and to catch another glimpse of Corde looking like he bit into a toxic lemon, but when you're exploring that same region and you know that an intelligent player could lie in wait around every corner, barren landscapes and labyrinthine military complexes suddenly take on a life you never would have imagined that they could possess.
Professor Layton and the Diabolical Box (DS)

Professor Layton and the Diabolical Box review (DS)

Reviewed on September 10, 2009

Since the best puzzles are only interesting when you're engaged in solving them yourself, it's almost doing the game a disservice to rave about their simplistic excellence. A description like "skate across a pond while bumping against barriers" doesn't sound like much on paper, for instance, but actually doing it gets a person thinking. Likewise, talking about calculating distance between folds in a slip of paper or guessing the value of components within a set of weights could leave a person yawning... yet it's a great deal of fun when you're actually playing the game.
Shadow Complex (Xbox 360)

Shadow Complex review (X360)

Reviewed on September 06, 2009

When you're not battling some metallic behemoth—most of the time, then—you're usually trying to get some gear that will allow you to survive the next brawl. That means seeking out weaponry wherever you can find it, whether that be at the far end of a furnace vent or in a small cranny on the opposite side of an underwater passage. There are plenty of goodies to collect if you're just patient enough to go through the same areas a few times as new supplies increase the distance you can jump, the speed with which you move and the explosive power of your sub-weapons. If you make sure to grab everything (or even if you don't), you shouldn't have any sort of trouble reaching the end of the adventure in one piece.
Groovin' Blocks (Wii)

Groovin' Blocks review (WII)

Reviewed on September 06, 2009

Multipliers aren't exactly a new concept, but getting them in Groovin' Blocks requires rhythm. As you move a piece left or right and rotate it so that the color configuration you have in mind can materialize, you have two options: you can either let the block drift downward at the speed the current stage dictates—for no multiplier whatsoever—or you can press the 'down' button to drop it. What's important is that when you press that button, you do so in time with the music's beat.
Active Life: Extreme Challenge (Wii)

Active Life: Extreme Challenge review (WII)

Reviewed on September 05, 2009

Active Life: Extreme Challenge can be described as an exercise game that allows players—children mostly, like the ones featured on the cover—to pretend that they're engaged in fascinating activities such as base jumping, wind surfing, rock climbing and double dutch jump rope competitions. With the exception of that last one, the activities digitally represented here are the sort of thing that no sane parent would ever allow his or her offspring enjoy before heading into late adolescence.
Guitar Hero: Aerosmith (PlayStation 3)

Guitar Hero: Aerosmith review (PS3)

Reviewed on August 30, 2009

Basically, you choose from a few possible rockers—none of them from the actual band—and then you are taken through a scattered recollection of their rise to fame. Between every five or so songs, there's a mess of interview footage that seems to have been edited by a chimpanzee with trouble concentrating on any one subject for more than three or four seconds. After a few sentence's worth of interesting trivia, you're taken to the song selection list and you get to choose from two songs that will be performed by musical acts who have connections to Aerosmith, such as Run DMC or Lenny Kravitz or The Black Crowes. Clear these and you'll be able to finish up with three Aerosmith songs.
Metroid Prime Trilogy (Wii)

Metroid Prime Trilogy review (WII)

Reviewed on August 25, 2009

Those who have played through the games before can likely think of a number of places where improved control would come in handy, and they should rest assured that in most cases the experience feels every bit as wonderful as they imagine.
G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (PlayStation 3)

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra review (PS3)

Reviewed on August 15, 2009

Instead of copying something like Halo or even a third-person shooter along the lines of Gears of War, two options that surely must have been appealing and may have led to something interesting, the developers went a different route. The result is a shooter viewed primarily from far overhead. Its not-quite-isometric viewpoint allows for expansive environments, large battles and lots of run 'n gun action, a bit like classic Contra if it were turned 90 degrees.
G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (Xbox 360)

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra review (X360)

Reviewed on August 12, 2009

Finishing a mission on "Casual" level won't award you as many tokens as the more challenging choices and effectively prevents you from ever recruiting a full team of mercenaries. That's disappointing since one of the game's coolest features is the ability to recruit four special Cobra characters. You'll either need to man up and repeat stages on the higher difficulty setting (or do so right from the start), or you'll need to play through the whole adventure as Duke and Scarlet so that you have points left once the coolest characters become available.
Ghostbusters: The Video Game (PlayStation 3)

Ghostbusters: The Video Game review (PS3)

Reviewed on August 09, 2009

The plot begins by ambitiously introducing two new central characters—a strange young woman and a rookie member of the ghostbusters team—but after that it almost immediately turns into a retread of familiar adventures. Many of the same faces and places make new appearances, to the point that although the story is technically all-new (and penned by Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis, who drafted the original), it often feels like a rerun. This time, though, someone stripped out most of the good parts. There's nowhere near enough of the memorable dialog that made the film so good and even the most interesting bits wear out their welcome because you're playing the thing, not watching it.
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time Re-shelled (Xbox 360)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time Re-shelled review (X360)

Reviewed on August 07, 2009

Something a lot of fans will appreciate is the ability to chase Krang and Shredder through time as a united team. On consoles, no more than two friends have ever been able to team up for the cause, but now you can gather three other buddies and really raise some shell! Both local and online play are allowed, with plenty of enthusiastic strangers just waiting to team up against evil at all times of the day, night and early morning.
Bookworm Adventures Volume 2 (PC)

Bookworm Adventures Volume 2 review (PC)

Reviewed on August 03, 2009

You might be wondering how the game could possibly be difficult. The answer is that you suddenly find yourself working with extreme limitations. Besides gaining life meters several times the length of your own, enemies gain the ability to lock half of your pieces so that they can't be used, or to devalue them so that playing the selected tiles gains you no particular advantage. Worse, they may even set things up so that playing your own pieces damages you! There are items that can be used to counter these effects, but they are gone for good once you make use of them... at least until you take the time to earn more. The process for that basically amounts to level grinding.
Little League World Series Baseball 2009 (Wii)

Little League World Series Baseball 2009 review (WII)

Reviewed on August 02, 2009

The general feel of a set of innings in Little League World Series Baseball 2009 doesn't seem to have changed much. You still control most of the important bits with the 'A' button and furious Wii Remote waggles. You still start a game out with mild swings—because that's all that is strictly necessary—and finish it up with wild convulsions that are enough to nearly put an arm out of socket because of their ferocity.
The King of Fighters XII (PlayStation 3)

The King of Fighters XII review (PS3)

Reviewed on July 28, 2009

The first and most obvious stumble is the limited character roster, which perhaps wouldn't be a problem except that some of the very most important fighters are missing in action. In particular, there's little presence from the female side of the crowd. Mai, best known for her heaving bosom but also for her acrobatic and lethal attack style, is nowhere to be seen. Somehow The King of Fighters feels wrong without her, like a Street Fighter game with no Chun-Li or a Dead or Alive game with no Kasumi. Mary didn't make the cut, either, nor did plenty of beefcakes.
Dawn of Discovery (DS)

Dawn of Discovery review (DS)

Reviewed on July 26, 2009

What sets Dawn of Discovery apart from many of its peers is the focus on multiple regions. It's never enough to just settle a single island, since certain resources are always out of reach until you expand to another island. This wrinkle adds a surprising amount of depth and forces a level of strategy that feels quite unique. The big difference isn't so much that you sail around the ocean—which sounds significant but ultimately isn't—but rather that you have to account for delays and you have to prioritize how you expand your empire.
Nancy Drew: Ransom of the Seven Ships (PC)

Nancy Drew: Ransom of the Seven Ships review (PC)

Reviewed on July 26, 2009

Ransom of the Seven Ships works because it has high ambitions. When you step into Nancy's shoes, you're doing more than clicking through a few lifeless menus. You're arriving at the edge of a hauntingly beautiful island, one that you'll cautiously explore over the next six or eight hours of play. White sands, lush foliage, towering cliffs and murky pools of water all meld perfectly to form Dread Isle, the sort of destination that should scare off tourists by reputation alone. The place is large enough that you'll use a golf cart when it comes time to explore everything, plus there are outlying islands that you'll have to reach by way of sailboat. The resulting sense of freedom adds a lot to (and to an extent defines) the whole affair.
Chain: The Lost Footprints (PC)

Chain: The Lost Footprints review (PC)

Reviewed on July 16, 2009

Chain: The Lost Footprints tries to offer a different sort of hentai experience. You've only been playing for a few minutes and already you've made two choices. Options don't typically come at the player so frequently in a genre known more for its one-handed play style. For that reason alone, the game initially feels different from the majority of its peers. Finally, you're an active participant instead of a voyeur. Will it continue to hold your interest, though?

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