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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (PlayStation 3)

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra review (PS3)

Reviewed on August 15, 2009

Instead of copying something like Halo or even a third-person shooter along the lines of Gears of War, two options that surely must have been appealing and may have led to something interesting, the developers went a different route. The result is a shooter viewed primarily from far overhead. Its not-quite-isometric viewpoint allows for expansive environments, large battles and lots of run 'n gun action, a bit like classic Contra if it were turned 90 degrees.
G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra (Xbox 360)

G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra review (X360)

Reviewed on August 12, 2009

Finishing a mission on "Casual" level won't award you as many tokens as the more challenging choices and effectively prevents you from ever recruiting a full team of mercenaries. That's disappointing since one of the game's coolest features is the ability to recruit four special Cobra characters. You'll either need to man up and repeat stages on the higher difficulty setting (or do so right from the start), or you'll need to play through the whole adventure as Duke and Scarlet so that you have points left once the coolest characters become available.
Ghostbusters: The Video Game (PlayStation 3)

Ghostbusters: The Video Game review (PS3)

Reviewed on August 09, 2009

The plot begins by ambitiously introducing two new central characters—a strange young woman and a rookie member of the ghostbusters team—but after that it almost immediately turns into a retread of familiar adventures. Many of the same faces and places make new appearances, to the point that although the story is technically all-new (and penned by Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis, who drafted the original), it often feels like a rerun. This time, though, someone stripped out most of the good parts. There's nowhere near enough of the memorable dialog that made the film so good and even the most interesting bits wear out their welcome because you're playing the thing, not watching it.
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time Re-shelled (Xbox 360)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time Re-shelled review (X360)

Reviewed on August 07, 2009

Something a lot of fans will appreciate is the ability to chase Krang and Shredder through time as a united team. On consoles, no more than two friends have ever been able to team up for the cause, but now you can gather three other buddies and really raise some shell! Both local and online play are allowed, with plenty of enthusiastic strangers just waiting to team up against evil at all times of the day, night and early morning.
Bookworm Adventures Volume 2 (PC)

Bookworm Adventures Volume 2 review (PC)

Reviewed on August 03, 2009

You might be wondering how the game could possibly be difficult. The answer is that you suddenly find yourself working with extreme limitations. Besides gaining life meters several times the length of your own, enemies gain the ability to lock half of your pieces so that they can't be used, or to devalue them so that playing the selected tiles gains you no particular advantage. Worse, they may even set things up so that playing your own pieces damages you! There are items that can be used to counter these effects, but they are gone for good once you make use of them... at least until you take the time to earn more. The process for that basically amounts to level grinding.
Little League World Series Baseball 2009 (Wii)

Little League World Series Baseball 2009 review (WII)

Reviewed on August 02, 2009

The general feel of a set of innings in Little League World Series Baseball 2009 doesn't seem to have changed much. You still control most of the important bits with the 'A' button and furious Wii Remote waggles. You still start a game out with mild swings—because that's all that is strictly necessary—and finish it up with wild convulsions that are enough to nearly put an arm out of socket because of their ferocity.
The King of Fighters XII (PlayStation 3)

The King of Fighters XII review (PS3)

Reviewed on July 28, 2009

The first and most obvious stumble is the limited character roster, which perhaps wouldn't be a problem except that some of the very most important fighters are missing in action. In particular, there's little presence from the female side of the crowd. Mai, best known for her heaving bosom but also for her acrobatic and lethal attack style, is nowhere to be seen. Somehow The King of Fighters feels wrong without her, like a Street Fighter game with no Chun-Li or a Dead or Alive game with no Kasumi. Mary didn't make the cut, either, nor did plenty of beefcakes.
Dawn of Discovery (DS)

Dawn of Discovery review (DS)

Reviewed on July 26, 2009

What sets Dawn of Discovery apart from many of its peers is the focus on multiple regions. It's never enough to just settle a single island, since certain resources are always out of reach until you expand to another island. This wrinkle adds a surprising amount of depth and forces a level of strategy that feels quite unique. The big difference isn't so much that you sail around the ocean—which sounds significant but ultimately isn't—but rather that you have to account for delays and you have to prioritize how you expand your empire.
Nancy Drew: Ransom of the Seven Ships (PC)

Nancy Drew: Ransom of the Seven Ships review (PC)

Reviewed on July 26, 2009

Ransom of the Seven Ships works because it has high ambitions. When you step into Nancy's shoes, you're doing more than clicking through a few lifeless menus. You're arriving at the edge of a hauntingly beautiful island, one that you'll cautiously explore over the next six or eight hours of play. White sands, lush foliage, towering cliffs and murky pools of water all meld perfectly to form Dread Isle, the sort of destination that should scare off tourists by reputation alone. The place is large enough that you'll use a golf cart when it comes time to explore everything, plus there are outlying islands that you'll have to reach by way of sailboat. The resulting sense of freedom adds a lot to (and to an extent defines) the whole affair.
Chain: The Lost Footprints (PC)

Chain: The Lost Footprints review (PC)

Reviewed on July 16, 2009

Chain: The Lost Footprints tries to offer a different sort of hentai experience. You've only been playing for a few minutes and already you've made two choices. Options don't typically come at the player so frequently in a genre known more for its one-handed play style. For that reason alone, the game initially feels different from the majority of its peers. Finally, you're an active participant instead of a voyeur. Will it continue to hold your interest, though?
Dawn of Discovery (Wii)

Dawn of Discovery review (WII)

Reviewed on July 13, 2009

Another feature that sets Dawn of Discovery apart from other simulation titles such as Civilization IV or SimCity is the occasional focus on maritime exploration. Instead of settling a single continent, you'll develop a bunch of smaller islands. This actually provides a unique dynamic, since you frequently come up against space constraints and also have to consider different fertility levels. For example, you might first land on an island where grain grows particularly well, but as your colony evolves from a simple fishing village into a city center, the people who live there will start craving hot spices, fashionable clothing and so forth.
Droplitz (Xbox 360)

Droplitz review (X360)

Reviewed on July 09, 2009

Even on the introductory levels, water drains too quickly from too many locations. It's easy to build up a solid chain of beautiful paths, only to watch it disappear in a flash as you're left scrambling to construct new paths while a steady stream of liquid trickles down through what formerly was a beautiful labyrinth but now is a complete mess. The obvious solution is to chain together new paths more quickly than they can disappear (an effort that has the added benefit of boosting your all-important score while also buying you precious seconds with which to plot your next move), but there's seldom sufficient time.
Overlord II (PlayStation 3)

Overlord II review (PS3)

Reviewed on July 06, 2009

Pastoral scenes and even the menacing fairytale forest are gone, replaced by environs that seem to have been drawn with no discernible rhyme or reason from a hat labeled "whatever was left." The icy village that you once called your home is improbably bordered by a tiny cave that leads almost immediately to a lush forest populated by elves who preach peace and love for all creatures. In effeminate voices they protest your vile actions (which literally include sending your minions forth to club baby seals) as you break apart pots and vases and swing the camera around wildly in an effort to see through thick foliage presented as an assortment of paper-thin textures.
Call of Juarez: Bound in Blood (PlayStation 3)

Call of Juarez: Bound in Blood review (PS3)

Reviewed on July 04, 2009

It can be a bit much to take in all at once, but Call of Juarez: Bound in Blood delights in telling its twisted tale in an unconventional and sometimes surprising fashion. The next likely event is seldom clear as the player careens wildly from one volatile shootout to another, never far from disaster and a few profanity-laced one-liners. You might not always understand what just happened, but that's okay; the only details you really have to keep in mind to stay on top of things is that you're one of two treasure-seeking brothers and that your job is to shoot the crap out of anything that moves.
The Legendary Starfy (DS)

The Legendary Starfy review (DS)

Reviewed on June 28, 2009

In case you're not satisfied with a diet of constant platforming and a steady trickle of new abilities, there are a variety of diversions along the way. For example, one stage finds Starfy rolled into a snowball. He'll barrel downhill and you have to move and jump—in the limited fashion available—to avoid falling into fatal gaps. Another break from the norm comes in the form of a series of mine cart rides where you can flip switches to raise the water level (good if you want to leap the widest chasms) while avoiding destructive bits of the landscape. Thanks to solid level design and a variety of neat puzzles, such moments aren't strictly necessary to keep the game engaging.
Mad Dog McCree Gunslinger Pack (Wii)

Mad Dog McCree Gunslinger Pack review (WII)

Reviewed on June 27, 2009

You'll quickly come to learn that timing is everything, which isn't so bad, but there's an unwelcome complication: the exact timing required is never quite clear. You have to aim and shoot before a certain point in any video footage. If you shoot too soon, though, nothing can happen except wasted bullets because the available video isn't ready to produce video of an enemy dying at that point in time. If you shoot too late, you might fire five or six rounds and then be shot anyway because you passed some arbitrary point where the directors weren't ready for you to succeed.
Cross Edge (PlayStation 3)

Cross Edge review (PS3)

Reviewed on June 14, 2009

Because of the haphazard manner in which information is presented, genre-standard processes such as item crafting, synthesis, skill point allotment, shopping, party formation and so forth all require that you dive through two or three screens. Even then, it can be difficult if you've accomplished what you meant to accomplish. Whether you're trying to guess at who can equip an item or merely trying to assign characters to your current rotation, prepare for frustration. There's no escaping the nightmare.
Fuel (PlayStation 3)

Fuel review (PS3)

Reviewed on June 12, 2009

Though on the surface the game appears to be just another tour of some established courses where your only goal is to finish ahead of all of your competition, that's not actually the best way to play. Instead, you're expected to chart your own routes while adhering to actual roads only to the extent that is required to pass through the checkpoints. Everything else is up to you. The freedom that this dynamic provides is cool at first. When you come to the first bend in the path and most of the other drivers ease gradually around it and toward the left, you'll probably love continuing straight ahead and launching over a ramp to shave a second off your time. Performing similar feats of daring on the next few bends is similarly great. Then you hit a tree and the cursing starts.
Up (Xbox 360)

Up review (X360)

Reviewed on June 11, 2009

Fortunately, cooperative play alleviates some of that. Two people can pick up controllers and it's easy to join or leave a game with the press of a button. That allows a parent or elder sibling to save the day if kids are becoming too frustrated. It's a great way for a parent to connect with his or her game-loving offspring without having to spend forever figuring out how things work. It also means that the game could become the perfect choice for a few hours of fun when new visitors enter your humble abode.
Terminator Salvation (PlayStation 3)

Terminator Salvation review (PS3)

Reviewed on June 04, 2009

At first, such encounters are thrilling because you don't know what's going on and it's easy to die. Any battle is epic. Then you learn how to utilize cover and you discover that you can basically just draw fire from behind a barrier while your allies shoot everyone from behind. That strategy works most of the time and when it doesn't, that only means that the roles have reversed. You're never required to do anything more mentally challenging than sneak and shoot.

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