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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
NBA Live 10 (PlayStation 3)

NBA Live 10 review (PS3)

Reviewed on February 03, 2010

The characters in this year's game move with more faithfulness to their real-life counterparts. The difference isn't huge, but it's there and it's just one of many tweaks that I absolutely appreciate. Other upgrades have also been made to things like the pick-and-roll control, opponent AI, blocking, dribbling, foul mechanics, rebounding, character models, sweat shading (you know you love it when the players glisten credibly), arenas, lighting and everything in between. I can confidently say that if you were to pinpoint every minor change, type up a comprehensive list and print it out on paper, you'd fill several pages.
Final Fantasy: Crystal Chronicles - The Crystal Bearers (Wii)

Final Fantasy: Crystal Chronicles - The Crystal Bearers review (WII)

Reviewed on February 01, 2010

The biggest flaw facing those who give The Crystal Bearers a chance is the way that the game requires so much tedious backtracking. Though the world that you'll explore throughout your adventure is beautiful, it's relatively small. That should mean that you almost never get lost, but it turns out that the available map is a lot like a blond airhead: fun to look at but useless in a jam. With that being the case, you'll need to rely on signposts that pepper the various roadways.
Half-Minute Hero (PSP)

Half-Minute Hero review (PSP)

Reviewed on January 29, 2010

Told in a generational sort of manner that's reminiscent of a more expanded Dragon Quest V, the plot in Half-Minute Hero won't win any awards for narrative originality. It obviously isn't trying to, either. Instead, it has fun rushing players through a laundry list of RPG cliches. The rapid-fire nature of plot twists prevents every 'surprise' from growing tiresome, even when you saw it coming whole seconds ahead of time, because you're constantly moving to a new location or task.
Death By Cube (Xbox 360)

Death By Cube review (X360)

Reviewed on January 24, 2010

You might call it a post-apocalyptic battlefield simulator, or a Geometry Wars clone or perhaps you'd even call it art. Certainly, the minimalist approach makes a case for that last descriptor. There's something beautiful about the simple way that the beautiful red oil splays across the screen, blood-like in its consistency. There's a subdued grace, too, as your robot glides over the desolate grid that makes up his world's landscape. There's even a certain emotional element driving his quest to set things right in a world he finds so different from the one that he once knew.
The Treasures of Montezuma 2 (PC)

The Treasures of Montezuma 2 review (PC)

Reviewed on January 21, 2010

You'll likely spend most of your time in said Adventure mode, both because you're initially compelled to do so and because the developers were wise enough to include rewards for working your way through its individual stages. Each success in that mode results in some in-game currency that you can use to purchase upgrades as you progress through the subsequent stages, ensuring that you have reason to keep playing at least for the first 10 hours or so. Once purchased, the upgrades activate if you manage to clear certain icons from the board, or if you eliminate pieces from the same color twice in a row.
Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth (Wii)

Castlevania: The Adventure ReBirth review (WII)

Reviewed on January 15, 2010

Here you'll find Death with his sickles and blades whirling madly around him, possessing a visage rendered more menacing than ever before by redrawn artwork. Here you'll find the Colossus with a hulking frame that fills the entire screen and shakes the whole chamber around him, here the familiar vampire bat that you've been battling since the original Castlevania.
Atelier Annie: Alchemists of Sera Island (DS)

Atelier Annie: Alchemists of Sera Island review (DS)

Reviewed on January 14, 2010

Nearly every action costs precious time, in fact, and there are no do-overs (though you can play through the whole adventure again after the credits roll and keep any of the items that you gathered on your first run). The setup works nicely, ensuring that more ambitious players can find a decent challenge in developing their empire while younger siblings and other amateur adventurers are free to take their time enjoying other less challenging aspects of the game.
Our House (DS)

Our House review (DS)

Reviewed on January 05, 2010

The main flaw that Our House suffers from isn't a technical one, however. It's the much more mundane issue of repetition. While nearly every one of the included mini-games are fun the first few times—or even the first 10 or 20—they can only amuse for so long. It's neat to be able to remodel rooms, but there's never any real motivation to do anything more than place the required objects in the room (perhaps without even giving much thought to artistic arrangement, which seems to be rated almost arbitrarily as long as you don't have a bureau's drawers opening into a wall or a toilet in the middle of the floor).
Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop (DS)

Cooking Mama 3: Shop & Chop review (DS)

Reviewed on January 03, 2010

Many of the steps that you encounter while preparing new recipes have also been switched up a bit in an effort to make that aspect of the game more robust. Some of these work out for the better and recall earlier diversions, such as when you must chop a carrot or potato into small bits. Others aren't familiar to me but work well anyway, such as when the game asks the player to circle eyes on old potatoes to remove them. Then come the zany additions, like when you find yourself catching falling marshmallows on a skewer while avoiding dog bones. I like a bit of zaniness in my games or I wouldn't be playing Cooking Mama in the first place, but some of the stuff included here still had me scratching my head.
Diner Dash: Flo on the Go (DS)

Diner Dash: Flo on the Go review (DS)

Reviewed on January 03, 2010

I can blast Martians, win illegal street races and save the realm from powerful sorcerers like nobody's business, but I'll come up short nearly every time when I'm asked to help a soccer mom find a quiet place to eat a meal as a couple with a screaming baby makes its presence known at an adjacent table. There are several distinct environments to conquer, but I struggled just to reach the second venue, a mere ten stages into what proved to be a much larger game.
Space Invaders Extreme 2 (DS)

Space Invaders Extreme 2 review (DS)

Reviewed on January 03, 2010

After all of the changes that Taito made when it first introduced Space Invaders Extreme, two new modes doesn't seem like enough. Time Attack mode is really nothing more than the opportunity to play the same few stages with a timer running. Bingo is just a scoring mechanism that rewards you for shooting enemies of various colors to fill a board on the top screen. Neither feature is a bad idea. Both of them would have gone well with the content of the previous release and there's no question in my mind that Space Invaders Extreme 2 is the finest in the series.
Rabbids Go Home (DS)

Rabbids Go Home review (DS)

Reviewed on January 02, 2010

Everything in Rabbids Go Home comes down to physics and proper use of your finite supply of items. Is there a pit that you can't cross? Put a spring-loaded boxing glove in its place so that when you drop from the edge, you'll go flying off toward the right to another ledge. Is an iron safe dangling in the way and blocking your path? Place some scissors higher along the rope that holds it so that a wandering rabbid can push a bowling ball from an even higher ledge that then will drop down and clamp the scissors shut so that they cut the rope and cause the safe to drop out of the way.
New Super Mario Bros. Wii (Wii)

New Super Mario Bros. Wii review (WII)

Reviewed on December 30, 2009

Some features go a long way toward making New Super Mario Bros. Wii the best installment that the franchise has ever seen, plus the sheer number of unique stages makes it one of the most robust. However, there are some issues that definitely hold things back and rob the game of the prestigious title that nearly belonged to it. Namely, the physics are wonky, the level design is frustrating and the highly anticipated multi-player mode is a disappointment under any but the perfect conditions.
LEGO Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues (PlayStation 3)

LEGO Indiana Jones 2: The Adventure Continues review (PS3)

Reviewed on December 28, 2009

Including bits from the original three movies was a wise decision on the part of the developers, but they also had to worry about not repeating the first game. The result is that some of the best scenes from those movies—most of them—aren't represented here. That certainly doesn't help the narrative and it may leave players wondering why there's a level devoted to Indiana and his father tied to chairs while flames burn around them. That was a neat scene in the third movie but here there's no urgency and the whole thing comes across as just another excuse for some exploration and puzzle solving.
Qix++ (Xbox 360)

Qix++ review (X360)

Reviewed on December 12, 2009

These changes at first seem to provide some welcome depth to the experience, but they come at a cost: instead of allowing you to play through an endless mode—which would have been a nice challenge and would have felt true to its arcade roots—the game now replenishes your stock of ships with each new stage and switches to a credits sequence once you finish the eighth zone. Then you can complete a second batch of eight stages. Once you've done that, you're done with the single-player mode unless you feel like going back to obtain a better score.
The Last Remnant (Xbox 360)

The Last Remnant review (X360)

Reviewed on November 23, 2009

Some battles will be a bit more difficult than they could be and you'll catch vague references to towns you've never heard of, but odds are significant that you won't really feel that you're missing a thing. It's easy to assume that the names are being dropped in an effort to artificially add color to the environments. Complete a few side quests, though, and you'll find out how wrong such assumptions were.
Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time (PlayStation 3)

Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time review (PS3)

Reviewed on November 19, 2009

The hunt for more weapons is one of the things that should keep you busy playing A Crack in Time. There actually aren't all that many unique locations to explore, but taking the paths less traveled can take awhile and prove worthwhile because you never know when you might find some new modification for your weapons. The gear that you might find serves as a practical reason to travel to every last nook and cranny. With such an excellent array of weapons, you won't want to miss a thing.
Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 (Xbox 360)

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2 review (X360)

Reviewed on November 12, 2009

As I ran through the buildings of a bombed out city, I saw one of my comrades fallen and lying in the field. As explosions rattled the structure around us, another soldier lifted the wounded man's body by the arms and began to drag him toward safety... until another bullet cut the hero down mid-stride. It was a set of events that I didn't have to watch. There was no cumbersome cutscene, no prerecorded dialog. It was just one of many such moments so typical of that level and many others, a moment made memorable precisely because no undue attention was called to it.
Star Wars: The Clone Wars - Republic Heroes (PlayStation 3)

Star Wars: The Clone Wars - Republic Heroes review (PS3)

Reviewed on November 01, 2009

I'm a big fan of games that refrain from forcing the player to re-play lengthy segments that he's already conquered just to tackle a challenging bit at the end, but Republic Heroes accommodates amateur gamers to a crippling extreme. There are maybe two or three segments in the whole game where you'll have to make more than three or four jumps without passing another checkpoint. Not only that, but anything that you've accomplished remains in place. So if you pass a checkpoint just ahead of a shootout with a bunch of enemies, the most you lose if you die is 2 or 3 seconds of play before you can return to the fray to mop up any of the remaining enemies who didn't fall on your first attempt.
Demon's Souls (PlayStation 3)

Demon's Souls review (PS3)

Reviewed on October 05, 2009

Some other challenging RPGs are enjoyable, sure, but they're a different sort of affair. They're tough because you haven't prepared yourself sufficiently or because there's an unavoidable attack that will always drain away most of your life. In stark contrast, Demon's Souls is tough because everything is completely fair, because every disaster is technically avoidable and because every enemy can kick your ass if you let your mind wander.

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