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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Wall Street Kid (NES)

Wall Street Kid review (NES)

Reviewed on May 09, 2011

The polished interface makes it easy to keep your attention where it should be: on deadlines. Those deadlines do a remarkably good job of building tension because you know that if you make too many mistakes, youíll lose everything. Stocks go up in value or drop sharply, so complacency works against you. Thereís a certain element of surprise, as well. You might get a hot stock tip and dump everything to invest in a new stock, only to see the next day that the stock you previously owned enjoyed a tremendous increase just after you ditched it. When youíre trying to drive up the value of your portfolio in time to buy a new car (or else face a ĎGame Overí screen), losses and missed opportunities really hit home.
Pokemon Black Version (DS)

Pokemon Black Version review (DS)

Reviewed on May 02, 2011

When you are wandering the wilds between towns, there often are places where the road simply stops. Then you must traverse tall grass or dark sand or whatever. That has always been true, but now every third or fourth step from the beaten path seems to result in a random encounter. Thatís not an exaggeration. Iíve counted on multiple occasions. Sometimes I would win a battle, take one step and then immediately find myself in another battle. I was hoping to take at least two or three steps.
Bust-A-Move Universe (3DS)

Bust-A-Move Universe review (3DS)

Reviewed on April 24, 2011

What Arika doesnít appear to have realized is that players will want some substance, even if theyíre ready to forgive the lack of a three-dimensional twist. Past Bust-A-Move games have provided all sorts of bells and whistles that kept people playing for a long while, but here thereís very little reason to keep playing beyond the first few hours.
Crystal Defenders (Xbox 360)

Crystal Defenders review (X360)

Reviewed on April 23, 2011

Even if you have the proper characters on the map, sometimes thatís not enough. You might have placed a bunch of archers but if none of them are leveled up, later foes can shrug off their attacks and rush through an entire gauntlet of archers or wizards. Since every level a character gains costs you more gold than the previous one did, Crystal Defenders becomes one of the most exhilarating games about effective resource management that youíll find on Xbox Live. A single mistake can be enough to throw off your whole approach.
Super Monkey Ball 3D (3DS)

Super Monkey Ball 3D review (3DS)

Reviewed on April 21, 2011

In appearance, itís the polished follow-up to Super Monkey Ball, with moderately large environments full of bumpers, slopes, sharp curves and rail-free edges that allow you to drop frequently to your doom. Purists will probably object, however, to the fact that many of the 80 included courses are much simpler than those that were featured in earlier titles. I promise thatís not just a complaint resulting from me becoming a pro at the series after all of these years. I still suck.
Okamiden (DS)

Okamiden review (DS)

Reviewed on April 18, 2011

The gameís structure most closely resembles something that youíd expect to find in The Legend of Zelda. Thereís a general overworld, with fields and mountain pathways, forests and beaches. That world connects a number of small towns, shrines and dungeons. You start with only a handful of locations that you can visit, but later in the game youíll be able to wander the map freely as you search every nook and cranny for the numerous collectibles secreted throughout the land. The overworld is a delight to explore, neither too large nor too simple for its own good, but the real attraction is the gameís assortment of dungeons.
Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition (3DS)

Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition review (3DS)

Reviewed on April 11, 2011

The gameís third significant change is more difficult to pin down as either a flaw or an improvement. Since the 3DS only has so many standard buttons available, extra moves are now mapped to the touch screen (which is quartered). By default, the touch screen allows you to execute up to four special moves with a single tap of your stylus or finger. If you find such coddling insulting, you can instead set your configuration so that those touch screen functions allow you to use more standard moves and throws.
Pilotwings Resort (3DS)

Pilotwings Resort review (3DS)

Reviewed on March 31, 2011

There are more than 40 missions, the gameís packaging cheerfully notes, but those missions typically can be completed within 2 or 3 minutes each. A higher score and a better star rating are your only reason to return to a mission once you satisfy its conditions, and once you unlock the next tier of missions, you might not wish to revisit the early challenges at all.
Dragon Quest VI: Realms of Revelation (DS)

Dragon Quest VI: Realms of Revelation review (DS)

Reviewed on March 15, 2011

Though Dragon Quest VI features an interesting and surprisingly complex plot, thatís not actually its most impressive accomplishment. The game probably could have done just as well without doing anything interesting with its plot because the real appeal comes from its impressive scope, its ingenuity and its remarkable depth.
LittleBigPlanet 2 (PlayStation 3)

LittleBigPlanet 2 review (PS3)

Reviewed on February 02, 2011

Todayís play session lasted several hours, but I could have just as easily have devoted weeks to the same endeavor. There are literally thousands of options left for me to explore. Iím not sure that I would have believed just how much there is to the LittleBigPlanet 2 community if I hadnít had the chance to experience it for myself. The people at Media Molecule and Sony have the right to be proud of what they have accomplished, and so do the creative gamers who have become a part of it.
Monopoly Streets (PlayStation 3)

Monopoly Streets review (PS3)

Reviewed on November 18, 2010

You can play by the standard rule set (with a few minor tweaks from the game that I remember), or you can select a few preset game modes. Those modes have names, such as "Bull Market" (where the players begin with more money and every piece of property is auctioned off before anyone even starts moving around the board) and "Jack Pot" (where it's possible to upgrade spaces that you own with houses and hotels even if you don't have a proper monopoly). If you'd prefer changes that are less drastic, you can create and name various custom configurations for convenient use down the road.
Call of Duty: Black Ops (Xbox 360)

Call of Duty: Black Ops review (X360)

Reviewed on November 15, 2010

So there are a lot of explosions and people cuss a lot, sometimes a few times per line of dialogue, and then when the tone is properly established there's not really much profanity at all and the explosions don't really impress as much because when you've seen one Jeep go up in flames, you've seen 'em all. It's at that moment, when you've become desensitized to the napalm and the knife thrusts and the pistol blasts, that you realize something: Black Ops isn't a particularly competent single-player shooter.
Vanquish (Xbox 360)

Vanquish review (X360)

Reviewed on October 19, 2010

Vanquish keeps the player too busy for him to stop and wonder if maybe he's seen this all before.
Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock (Xbox 360)

Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock review (X360)

Reviewed on October 02, 2010

Yes, it feels a little bit stupid at first. However, the transformations are important because each character can utilize special abilities. These work almost like cheats. For example, one character can earn an additional two stars on any song if you play well enough that he otherwise would earn five. Another has the ability to ignore an error or two in short succession, meaning that if you miss a note it's not necessarily the end of a crazy streak you had going. There are eight characters in all, each with special abilities that have the potential to change how you play and to allow your fake artistry to reach new heights.
Etrian Odyssey III: The Drowned City (DS)

Etrian Odyssey III: The Drowned City review (DS)

Reviewed on September 20, 2010

As you venture through the unknown environments, you'll find points where it's possible to harvest, mine or just snatch up items that you can take back with you to town and possibly turn into new armor and weapons at the local city's single shop. So there's that element prodding you to actually explore (instead of simply walking circles in close proximity to a staircase) and there's the realization that at some point, you're going to have to actually plot your way into the darkness or you'll never find the next staircase and the next boss. The likelihood that said boss will summarily demolish you upon contact is really beside the point.
Castlevania: Harmony of Despair (Xbox 360)

Castlevania: Harmony of Despair review (X360)

Reviewed on August 02, 2010

This game wouldn't defeat me, I told myself, not with its very first stage. For once I was even right. Two hours later, I finally had my victory. Along the way I had memorized attack patterns, grown better at my double jumps and I had found the shortest and safest route from the stage entrance to the boss chamber. With better equipment and an actual plan, I won my first round and progressed to the second stage... where steel traps impaled me, men erupted in plumes of poison and walls of flame threatened to burn me to a crisp. Remember what it used to feel like to play a Castlevania game? The people at Konami clearly do.
LEGO Harry Potter: Years 1-4 (PlayStation 3)

LEGO Harry Potter: Years 1-4 review (PS3)

Reviewed on July 30, 2010

Exploring every nook and cranny is oddly addictive, perhaps because there's usually something new to see or hear. Whether you're climbing the owlery tower to listen to compositions on an old phonograph or playing around in a room full of muggle artifacts and watching a car fly out the window, the incentives that the game offers the true fan seldom disappoint. They're almost enough to make a fellow sigh when he finally finds everything. Almost.
Young Thor (PlayStation 3)

Young Thor review (PS3)

Reviewed on July 24, 2010

Though it's easy to steamroll through many of the early fights in the game by simply pounding the ground a lot or frying adversaries from a distance, later battles require more finesse and some of them (like the banshees) will force you to develop actual strategies if you want to consistently win. After all, ground pounds don't work well on teleporting ghosts. Those later encounters keep things interesting by practically forcing you to utilize dodges, since you'll eventually run out of magical energy if you don't string together your most powerful attacks with some weaker ones.
Limbo (Xbox 360)

Limbo review (X360)

Reviewed on July 23, 2010

The first thing that you're sure to notice is the monochrome visual design. There's not a drop of color to be seen. You might suppose that Limbo would be an ugly game as a result, or that things would quickly blur together into a thoroughly forgettable mess. Nothing could be further from the truth, however. The lush forests and the imposing industrial areas that you'll explore over the course of your adventure are presented with exemplary attention to detail. Insects fill the air, mist rolls through the trees and clods of dirt fly into the air as the hero scrambles along ledges or wades through knee-high grass. Yet even with the signs of life all around, there's a striking sense of isolation. Something is wrong with the world and, for the right sort of gamer, that will feel very right.
Naughty Bear (Xbox 360)

Naughty Bear review (X360)

Reviewed on July 07, 2010

Each new weapon has a kill animation to go with it, but none of those animations are all that amusing after the first three or four times that you see them. I enjoy pouncing on an over-sized bear and hacking apart his face with an ax as much as the next guy, but the game's cover artwork looks substantially more depraved than the final product actually feels. Where's the crimson, or at least a cloud of puff? These are the blandest ax murders you'll ever see, hands down. Unless you're switching weapons constantly (and perhaps even then), you could easily tire of the animations before you even finish the first of the game's many repetitive stages.

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