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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Rock of Ages (Xbox 360)

Rock of Ages review (X360)

Reviewed on August 28, 2011

The persistent silliness is supplemented nicely by a unique mix of action and strategy elements. A given round begins with the human hero locked in a fortress on one side of the map while his antagonist is sequestered in a similar structure on the map’s opposite edge. Between those two points, on the high ground, there are two mines. Your followers feverishly work to fashion a large stone boulder that you will then guide as it rolls down the slope and toward your enemy’s fortress. You try to avoid taking damage so that you retain as much of your mass as possible and can break through your foe’s gate when you arrive.
Jeopardy! (Wii)

Jeopardy! review (WII)

Reviewed on August 06, 2011

Fortunately, you can avoid the issues with the various difficulty presets by choosing the hidden “Custom” difficulty option and tweaking each setting as you see fit. In that manner, it’s possible to introduce near-perfect balance to a game that very much needs it. The developers could have saved everyone a lot of grief if they had just put those options on a startup screen ahead of each competition, but apparently the sort of audience that enjoys answering obscure trivia questions isn’t ready for something so mentally taxing.
Catherine (PlayStation 3)

Catherine review (PS3)

Reviewed on July 31, 2011

In the evenings, after spending entirely too much time drinking with his buddies at a bar called the Stray Sheep and talking about nightmares that leave his mind when he awakens in the morning, Vincent goes home and goes to bed and dreams that he is climbing a seemingly endless tower of blocks while many others around him—all of them appearing as sheep—do the same thing. If Vincent can only reach the cathedral on the eighth floor, a mysterious stranger in a confessional booth promises him, the recurring nightmares will cease.
Bastion (Xbox 360)

Bastion review (X360)

Reviewed on July 27, 2011

As you run around each gorgeous environment, admiring the dense foliage or the imposing brambles or the stone walls or whatever else, the path ahead of you fills in abruptly. Tiles fly up from beneath the screen, as if drawn to you like magnets. It’s an interesting dynamic to see in action, distracting at first before soon becoming intuitive. Pathways prevent you from wandering too far off the beaten path—because you really can’t—and they give the world its own identity. To an extent, it feels like you’re truly living through an apocalypse.
Dungeon Siege III (PC)

Dungeon Siege III review (PC)

Reviewed on July 26, 2011

Weapon selection isn’t all there is to the combat, though. Each character can master specialized skills that you can then use profusely. A skill requires a bit of focus from your meter, but you can swiftly refill that meter simply by hitting your adversaries with a few standard shots or strikes. The result is that it’s entirely feasible to roll through the whole game using the “fun” moves almost exclusively. Yet you can also roll out of the way of incoming targets, block sword strokes and projectiles and even heal yourself.
The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings (PC)

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings review (PC)

Reviewed on July 08, 2011

The Witcher 2 doesn’t stop with waterfalls and ferns, though, or even with prostitutes and foul-mouthed dwarves and snide noblemen. It paints this fantastic world full of complicated people and it lets you interact with all of that in such a way that eventually, like Geralt himself, you are unable to continue as a passive observer. You have a stake in what happens to the people around you, a position in the middle of all of it that you chose for yourself through your prior actions.
The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time 3D (3DS)

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time 3D review (3DS)

Reviewed on June 20, 2011

When I started playing the actual game, though, my perspective changed almost immediately. Link’s prophetic nightmare, the shivering elven boy on the straw mattress, the dying monarch of the forest summoning a fairy and the awkward bump against the fence that looks too much like an open waffle iron all unfolded almost exactly the way I remembered them from previous trips through the game, but I realized with surprise that something unexpected was taking place: I was loving each moment again.
Thor: God of Thunder (PlayStation 3)

Thor: God of Thunder review (PS3)

Reviewed on June 02, 2011

You won’t have to play Thor much at all to see that the title is inspired by the highly successful God of War series. Kratos, the bald-headed warrior from that other series, has simply been replaced here by the blond-haired and impetuous Thor. Instead of wielding a whip, he swings a hammer around like a sword… when he’s not grabbing monsters three or four times his size and wrestling them to the ground by the horns. This is a “T”-rated game, though, so there are no severed heads or geysers of blood and there are no naked women in mini-games or elsewhere. Thor may be a god, but he lives in a bland world.
Dungeons & Dragons: Daggerdale (Xbox 360)

Dungeons & Dragons: Daggerdale review (X360)

Reviewed on May 27, 2011

Dungeons & Dragons: Daggerdale has a lot of glitches, very little plot, almost no enemy variety and a sloppy interface that sometimes makes playing the game a chore. The first few hours almost immediately feel tedious, but the game improves from there. Unfortunately, it never really does anything especially memorable.
Dead or Alive: Dimensions (3DS)

Dead or Alive: Dimensions review (3DS)

Reviewed on May 26, 2011

Environments are expectedly gorgeous and expansive, with cascading waterfalls and rope bridges that span wide chasms. There also are the underground laboratory and ancient rooftop venues, and you can still knock your opponent from high ledges and then follow to kick his or her butt on lower ground. In other words, any concessions that had to be made due to the hardware have minimal impact on the presentation… when it comes to fights.
Wall Street Kid (NES)

Wall Street Kid review (NES)

Reviewed on May 09, 2011

The polished interface makes it easy to keep your attention where it should be: on deadlines. Those deadlines do a remarkably good job of building tension because you know that if you make too many mistakes, you’ll lose everything. Stocks go up in value or drop sharply, so complacency works against you. There’s a certain element of surprise, as well. You might get a hot stock tip and dump everything to invest in a new stock, only to see the next day that the stock you previously owned enjoyed a tremendous increase just after you ditched it. When you’re trying to drive up the value of your portfolio in time to buy a new car (or else face a ‘Game Over’ screen), losses and missed opportunities really hit home.
Pokemon Black Version (DS)

Pokemon Black Version review (DS)

Reviewed on May 02, 2011

When you are wandering the wilds between towns, there often are places where the road simply stops. Then you must traverse tall grass or dark sand or whatever. That has always been true, but now every third or fourth step from the beaten path seems to result in a random encounter. That’s not an exaggeration. I’ve counted on multiple occasions. Sometimes I would win a battle, take one step and then immediately find myself in another battle. I was hoping to take at least two or three steps.
Bust-A-Move Universe (3DS)

Bust-A-Move Universe review (3DS)

Reviewed on April 24, 2011

What Arika doesn’t appear to have realized is that players will want some substance, even if they’re ready to forgive the lack of a three-dimensional twist. Past Bust-A-Move games have provided all sorts of bells and whistles that kept people playing for a long while, but here there’s very little reason to keep playing beyond the first few hours.
Crystal Defenders (Xbox 360)

Crystal Defenders review (X360)

Reviewed on April 23, 2011

Even if you have the proper characters on the map, sometimes that’s not enough. You might have placed a bunch of archers but if none of them are leveled up, later foes can shrug off their attacks and rush through an entire gauntlet of archers or wizards. Since every level a character gains costs you more gold than the previous one did, Crystal Defenders becomes one of the most exhilarating games about effective resource management that you’ll find on Xbox Live. A single mistake can be enough to throw off your whole approach.
Super Monkey Ball 3D (3DS)

Super Monkey Ball 3D review (3DS)

Reviewed on April 21, 2011

In appearance, it’s the polished follow-up to Super Monkey Ball, with moderately large environments full of bumpers, slopes, sharp curves and rail-free edges that allow you to drop frequently to your doom. Purists will probably object, however, to the fact that many of the 80 included courses are much simpler than those that were featured in earlier titles. I promise that’s not just a complaint resulting from me becoming a pro at the series after all of these years. I still suck.
Okamiden (DS)

Okamiden review (DS)

Reviewed on April 18, 2011

The game’s structure most closely resembles something that you’d expect to find in The Legend of Zelda. There’s a general overworld, with fields and mountain pathways, forests and beaches. That world connects a number of small towns, shrines and dungeons. You start with only a handful of locations that you can visit, but later in the game you’ll be able to wander the map freely as you search every nook and cranny for the numerous collectibles secreted throughout the land. The overworld is a delight to explore, neither too large nor too simple for its own good, but the real attraction is the game’s assortment of dungeons.
Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition (3DS)

Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition review (3DS)

Reviewed on April 11, 2011

The game’s third significant change is more difficult to pin down as either a flaw or an improvement. Since the 3DS only has so many standard buttons available, extra moves are now mapped to the touch screen (which is quartered). By default, the touch screen allows you to execute up to four special moves with a single tap of your stylus or finger. If you find such coddling insulting, you can instead set your configuration so that those touch screen functions allow you to use more standard moves and throws.
Pilotwings Resort (3DS)

Pilotwings Resort review (3DS)

Reviewed on March 31, 2011

There are more than 40 missions, the game’s packaging cheerfully notes, but those missions typically can be completed within 2 or 3 minutes each. A higher score and a better star rating are your only reason to return to a mission once you satisfy its conditions, and once you unlock the next tier of missions, you might not wish to revisit the early challenges at all.
Dragon Quest VI: Realms of Revelation (DS)

Dragon Quest VI: Realms of Revelation review (DS)

Reviewed on March 15, 2011

Though Dragon Quest VI features an interesting and surprisingly complex plot, that’s not actually its most impressive accomplishment. The game probably could have done just as well without doing anything interesting with its plot because the real appeal comes from its impressive scope, its ingenuity and its remarkable depth.
LittleBigPlanet 2 (PlayStation 3)

LittleBigPlanet 2 review (PS3)

Reviewed on February 02, 2011

Today’s play session lasted several hours, but I could have just as easily have devoted weeks to the same endeavor. There are literally thousands of options left for me to explore. I’m not sure that I would have believed just how much there is to the LittleBigPlanet 2 community if I hadn’t had the chance to experience it for myself. The people at Media Molecule and Sony have the right to be proud of what they have accomplished, and so do the creative gamers who have become a part of it.

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