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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by overdrive and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Burai Fighter (NES)

Burai Fighter review (NES)

Reviewed on February 22, 2008

From there, despite graphical differences, the second, fourth, fifth and seventh stages are essentially the same. You go one way while blasting stuff, change direction while killing more things, change direction again and so on until you get to the boss. While it’s a nice formula that does have its moments, such as in the fifth level where you seemingly spend an eternity in the first corridor scrolling every which way before moving on, things tend to feel like you're?doing the same thing over and over again.
Kirby's Dream Land (Game Boy)

Kirby's Dream Land review (GB)

Reviewed on February 21, 2008

Without his ability-stealing powers, Kirby’s a pretty dull hero. He can gulp down some air and fly, he can spit that air at enemies and he can swallow them and their projectiles to either shoot at other foes or eat. And that’s all. He won’t pick up a sword or hammer. He can’t emit an freezing barrier to turn foes into blocks of ice. He’ll never transform into a fast-moving, laser-shooting UFO. Kirby might not simultaneously suck and blow, but those are about the only things he is capable of doing.
Tales of Legendia (PlayStation 2)

Tales of Legendia review (PS2)

Reviewed on January 31, 2008

Now, if I wanted to use a bit of tactics, I’d hit the O along with the directional pad to use one of Senel’s special attacks. And if I REALLY wanted to go overboard, I’d program a magic-user’s healing spell to either the L2 or R2 button and personally dictate when they regenerated everyone’s life. And if forcing one character to CONSTANTLY cure everyone didn’t make even the toughest boss fights pathetically easy, well, there’s Climax Mode.
Flying Hero: Bugyuru no Daibouken (SNES)

Flying Hero: Bugyuru no Daibouken review (SNES)

Reviewed on January 23, 2008

The graphics were bright and colorful and it was pretty entertaining to see Sofel’s take on certain staple elements of shooters — such as the 1943-ish gunship in the game’s third level which leads to a boss fight when the final two crew members leap off the crippled boat and merge into a gigantic pirate bird.
Wally Bear and the No Gang (NES)

Wally Bear and the No Gang review (NES)

Reviewed on December 30, 2007

The first few levels are pitifully easy and repetitive as hell. Then, towards the end, the difficulty level reaches the WTF?!? phase that horrid NES games seemingly took pride in achieving as Wally, who isn't the easiest guy to control in mid-air, is stuck doing a number of precise jumps with death being the price of failure. And all he's trying to do is get to his uncle's house for a party. Maybe Wally should scrap his morality lessons and hang out with Ricky Rat — all he has to do is jump some dogs and dodge some birds to visit him!
Lufia: The Ruins of Lore (Game Boy Advance)

Lufia: The Ruins of Lore review (GBA)

Reviewed on December 21, 2007

So, what you’ll be doing in virtually every dungeon is constantly switching between characters to have them break what needs to be broken and then flipping a switch or pressing a button to get to the next room. Great “puzzles”, guys! With the lack of brain power needed to accomplish this, it really makes you notice certain things about the dungeons — like how they’re really long and dull.
Tenchi o Kurau II: Shokatsu Koumei Den (NES)

Tenchi o Kurau II: Shokatsu Koumei Den review (NES)

Reviewed on December 20, 2007

It’s not that it’s a bad game by any means — it just doesn’t offer anything important that already wasn’t in the original Destiny of an Emperor. In fact, this game essentially takes the majority of the first one and adds a lot of story-telling to what is essentially a Dragon Warrior clone set in feudal China.
Wizardry: Proving Grounds of the Mad Overlord (NES)

Wizardry: Proving Grounds of the Mad Overlord review (NES)

Reviewed on November 30, 2007

You’ll open the battle against a shadowy figure with an vague name like “unseen entity” and have to wait a turn or two before the foe’s real name is revealed. And that can be dangerous, as this “unseen entity” could be a Murphy’s Ghost, which primarily exists to give young parties a high-experience foe weak enough for them to beat without much risk OR it could be any of many undesirable level-draining undead.
Duke Nukem 3D (PC)

Duke Nukem 3D review (PC)

Reviewed on November 02, 2007

In the first two levels of this game’s first scenario, Duke takes refuge from the alien-infested streets in such wholesome places as an adult movie theater and strip club — where he can get tit shows from the pole dancers while making leering comments that make me think “drunken, seedy uncle” more than “savior of Earth”. God, Duke’s great!
Deadly Towers (NES)

Deadly Towers review (NES)

Reviewed on October 18, 2007

It just isn’t fun to take novice hero Prince Meyer through corridors littered with non-threatening bouncing slime-like things — only to unexpectedly get whisked away to a maze loaded with animal-headed humanoids capable of disemboweling him with one hit. It’s really not fun to have to run aimlessly through these places in hopes that you’ll get lucky and find the exit before something kills Meyer. And it’s REALLY REALLY not fun to actually escape one of these places, only to blunder into another 15 seconds later.
Might & Magic III: Isles of Terra (PC)

Might & Magic III: Isles of Terra review (PC)

Reviewed on October 11, 2007

And those limitations make themselves known as soon as the game begins. Among the initial tasks set before players is one involving destroying the swarm of rats that’ve taken over Fountain Head, the town where the game starts. Attempting to do this immediately will likely lead to a quick demise, though, as those rats are a bit too fierce for a beginning party. Heck, even exploring the back alley’s of Fountain Head’s not advisable as there are a few slime-like critters capable of giving a group of novices a tougher fight that they might anticipate.
Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas (PlayStation 2)

Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 14, 2007

Simply put, this game is HUGE — so large that a representation of one of America’s largest cities only takes up one corner of its world. Also in the game are San Fierro (San Francisco), Las Venturas (Las Vegas) and miles upon miles of the surrounding countryside, which is loaded with farms, villages, mountains and even a top-secret military base. And very little space is wasted. During the course of play, Carl will find himself doing either mandatory or optional missions that force him to cover virtually every square inch of this vast realm.
Final Fantasy Legend (Game Boy)

Final Fantasy Legend review (GB)

Reviewed on September 07, 2007

For example, in the very first world, all a player has to do is go to three castles and get a specific item from each king to open the next few floors of the tower for exploration. One king gladly does so if the party kills a local bandit living in a tiny cave. Another fights the party for his treasure in what could be considered a mini-boss fight. The third is assassinated, leaving the party to slaughter the weak usurper and claim the third item. All of this could be done in 15 minutes — if I hadn’t had to spend a good hour or so fighting monsters to earn money for equipment and to build up my humans.
Saga Frontier (PlayStation)

Saga Frontier review (PSX)

Reviewed on September 06, 2007

So, even though I only had to do all this “magic collecting” once, I wound up choosing to do it with the majority of the other characters. That got boring pretty quickly, as the hunts for mystical runes and tarot cards are the same regardless of who is doing them.
Hydlide (NES)

Hydlide review (NES)

Reviewed on August 22, 2007

While this place is guarded by a seemingly immortal dragon, that’s of little concern to Jim, as all this beast does is go back and forth aimlessly. If Jim’s not directly in its never-changing path, it ignores him. Apparently Varalys doesn’t pay his employees enough for them to give a damn. I (typing this at work) can relate.
Ganpuru: Gunman's Proof (SNES)

Ganpuru: Gunman's Proof review (SNES)

Reviewed on August 15, 2007

Then, early in the seventh hideout, you can pick one of two sets of clothes. One greatly enhances Zero’s attack, while the other does the same to his defense. Take the first suit and no enemy, even the final boss, can stand up to his power. Grab the second and it’ll take even the toughest foes an eternity to whittle down his life meter. Considering you’ll probably have obtained a good number of extra lives by this point, it now is nearly impossible to actually die.
The Guardian Legend (NES)

The Guardian Legend review (NES)

Reviewed on August 01, 2007

Optomon doesn’t initially seem so imposing. This circular, one-eyed mass of vegetation does little but float from one side of the screen to the other while emitting bullets and unpredictable, but slow-moving, lasers. But, while pummeling the monster with everything she has, the Guardian brushes one of those lasers and watches her life bar get decimated. Suddenly, this fight has become a lot more tense as she realizes even the smallest mistake could be her last. And take my word on it — it’s easy to get so focused on dodging lasers that this critter’s weak bullets are what deals the killing blow....
Dragon View (SNES)

Dragon View review (SNES)

Reviewed on July 25, 2007

Part of the reason I found so many of the monsters to be easy to kill was because I'd wind up blundering through so many one-way doors and had to fight the same groups of enemies repeatedly that, for a good portion of the game, Alex was over-leveled for just about everything he faced.
Vapor Trail (Genesis)

Vapor Trail review (GEN)

Reviewed on July 13, 2007

In Vapor Trail you can take three hits before blowing up while your pilot’s WONDERFULLY digitized voice utters something along the lines of ”A gin olt gi!” (possible translation: “I can’t hold it!”). Oh, and this isn’t just a case of giving a player one plane that can take three hits — you have three lives, as well. Sure, the next life will start out with no weaponry beyond a weak gun, but this game still is far more generous than the average shooter.
The Legend of Silkroad (Arcade)

The Legend of Silkroad review (ARC)

Reviewed on July 05, 2007

Every single time a player loses a life and either starts their next one or continues the game, not only do all enemies on the screen get knocked down (a common procedure in these games), but they also lose a noticeable amount of life. Technically, it is possible for a player to defeat even the toughest bosses in this game WITHOUT lifting a finger. Sure, it’d be completely lame for anyone to consider this an acceptable way to win fights — but the simple fact it’s possible to advance through powerhouse foes in this manner is shocking to me.

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