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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by overdrive and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Double Dragon II (Game Boy)

Double Dragon II review (GB)

Reviewed on September 26, 2008

So each one of these guys requires the same strategy. Lure them up or down to your level, hit the uppercut, hit the knee drop, run away before they recover and do the same thing over and over until the chap's down for the count. That's it. There are no variations to this formula and no tricks to dissuade you from using it.
Toxic Crusaders (Game Boy)

Toxic Crusaders review (GB)

Reviewed on September 24, 2008

At the beginning of each segment of each stage, players get to choose between Toxie and any of his four sidekicks. I can't be bothered to remember their names because all of them are, for all intents and purposes, the exact same as Toxie. All five characters are the same size, have the same mobility and fire projectiles at the same speed.
Milon's Secret Castle (NES)

Milon's Secret Castle review (NES)

Reviewed on September 03, 2008

My guess is that the presence of the word "Secret" in this game's title is rooted in the fact that virtually every room here holds hordes of secret rooms and items. You aren't expected to just fire your weapon at enemies (that quickly respawn), but at EVERYTHING. You'll be breaking blocks like crazy. You'll be firing into blank, empty air. You'll be constantly flooding the screen with bubbles because any single location in any single room just might hide a doorway leading to something you need to clear the game.
Okami (PlayStation 2)

Okami review (PS2)

Reviewed on August 14, 2008

Some dungeons also do memorable jobs of balancing on the line between epic and comedic, with the vast cavernous fortress Orochi calls home being perhaps the best example. The battle with the great serpent is an awesome clash that's topped off with cowardly warrior Susano finally accepting his heritage as the descendant of Nagi and realizing his heroic potential. Leading into this.....you're running around with a mask covering your head and fetching ingredients for an imp chef so it can concoct the perfect side course to Orochi's virtuous maiden supper.
Word Zapper (Atari 2600)

Word Zapper review (A2600)

Reviewed on August 09, 2008

A good number of these things will ram into you and bump your ship a smidgen off to the side, making it tougher to get a bead on the proper letter. Another type threatens to make the game fun by temporarily scrambling the letters, so you don't know when the one you're looking for will appear. And the final type just obliterates your ship — a tactic that's far more useful in preventing players from spelling words than those used by the other shapes. You can destroy these objects, but there's no real point, as they aren't hard to dodge and you get no reward for doing so.
Swordquest: FireWorld (Atari 2600)

Swordquest: FireWorld review (A2600)

Reviewed on August 07, 2008

Well, my nine-or-10-year-old mind had an absolutely FANTASTIC time wandering aimlessly through this maze and struggling through one action sequence after another, only to grab a couple of items, put them in another room and.....see nothing happen. I vaguely recall getting a clue once. That moment was so exciting, it shocked my body into puberty. And then I realized I'd lost my official Fireworld comic book, so that clue couldn't have been more worthless to me.
Chase the Chuckwagon (Atari 2600)

Chase the Chuckwagon review (A2600)

Reviewed on August 06, 2008

To pick up your own copy of Chase the Chuckwagon, you had to buy a bunch of Ralston-Purina's products and send in the proofs of purchase. Not surprisingly, very few of these games wound up in gamers' hands and the majority of the cartridges were destroyed. This ingenious idea might go a long ways towards explaining why, a decade after this site's creation, I still had to add Spectravision to our list of developers in order to include it with this game's data.
Journey Escape (Atari 2600)

Journey Escape review (A2600)

Reviewed on July 31, 2008

Run into the Kool-Aid man (who supposedly represents your manager, but the dudes in the band were probably on so much blow they couldn't tell the difference) and you'll get money and be invulnerable to anything with that band member, making it child's play to run right to the vehicle.
Keystone Kapers (Atari 2600)

Keystone Kapers review (A2600)

Reviewed on July 31, 2008

More distressing are the toy planes. Taking one of those upside the head is enough to send a Kop down for the count. And, as you might expect, Harry is 100 percent immune to all of these distractions as he merrily dashes for freedom.
Cyberdreams (PC)

Cyberdreams review (PC)

Reviewed on July 24, 2008

It's a very challenging game that is probably the most cerebral Doom wad I've ever played. But, it also bored the crap out of me. While the levels are all designed differently and the Cybers are placed in many very tricky locations, I just couldn't shake the feeling I was doing the same thing over and over again. After only doing a handful of levels, the lack of variety had really sapped my enthusiasm.
Strike Gunner: S.T.G. (SNES)

Strike Gunner: S.T.G. review (SNES)

Reviewed on June 26, 2008

The only question is: would a player want to go back through this one to tinker with the difficulty and experiment with each weapon in different levels to find the perfect combination? I didn't. While I really liked some of the concepts present in Strike Gunner, I found myself wishing they'd been placed in a better game.
Medal of Honor: Vanguard (PlayStation 2)

Medal of Honor: Vanguard review (PS2)

Reviewed on June 11, 2008

Now, instead of using canteens and first aid kits to restore health, all you have to do is duck out of the fray for a bit. Keegan can completely regenerate his health in a matter of seconds if he is able to avoid getting shot. To make this easier than you might expect, a good number of Nazis seem content to stay in one place and wait for you to enter their shooting range, as opposed to pursuing you in order to deal that killing blow.
The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (Game Boy Color)

The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons review (GBC)

Reviewed on June 09, 2008

Take Dodongo, for example. To defeat this chap, you first have to use the tried and true strategy of feeding him bombs. Then, after he's stunned by the explosion, using the power bracelet, you must pick him up and toss him onto a bed of spikes before he regains his equilibrium.
Resident Evil 4 (PlayStation 2)

Resident Evil 4 review (PS2)

Reviewed on May 29, 2008

Those early-game villagers utilize all sorts of farming implements, such as pitchforks, sickles and hatchets, in their attempts to end Leon's mission prematurely. And they're the patsies. Just wait until one of their heads explodes to release a tentacle-flailing parasite seemingly crafted in the darkest recesses of H.P. Lovecraft's imagination. Or a gigantic ogre lumbers into the fray, rips a gnarled tree out of the ground and starts swinging it around like it was light as a feather. Or a monstrous semi-invisible bug pounces, spraying Leon with acidic secretions.
Stinger (NES)

Stinger review (NES)

Reviewed on April 25, 2008

Part of the problem is that all three horizontal stages feel the exact same, as do the four vertical ones — with the only noticeable differences being the background graphics and the ferocity of the enemy waves. Each level, regardless of viewpoint, has the TwinBee ship moving on a slowly-scrolling screen while one wave after another of flying foes come after it.
Obscure: The Aftermath (PlayStation 2)

Obscure: The Aftermath review (PS2)

Reviewed on April 22, 2008

All the kids are planning to hit up some exclusive frat party, but first — it's time to partake of the new awesome college party drug. Some mysterious new flower's pollen, if inhaled, bestows a really good buzz and some wacky hallucinations. In fact, they're so wacky that Corey and Mei find themselves in a creeped-out locale ripped right out of any number of hellish Silent Hill locations. After enduring a few experiences nightmarish enough to convince just about anyone besides me that drugs are bad, Corey wakes up a bathroom with the hangover to end all hangovers.
Tag Team Wrestling (NES)

Tag Team Wrestling review (NES)

Reviewed on April 04, 2008

You don’t have complex button combos to press in order to do moves in Tag Team Wrestling — instead, you have a menu. Yes, a menu. All you do is get close to an opponent and push a button to “lock up” with him. Then, you have a couple seconds to tap the other button to scroll through a list of moves and select one. Then, you get to sit back and watch your dude execute that move before preparing to do the whole thing again and again and again.
Burai Fighter (NES)

Burai Fighter review (NES)

Reviewed on February 22, 2008

From there, despite graphical differences, the second, fourth, fifth and seventh stages are essentially the same. You go one way while blasting stuff, change direction while killing more things, change direction again and so on until you get to the boss. While it’s a nice formula that does have its moments, such as in the fifth level where you seemingly spend an eternity in the first corridor scrolling every which way before moving on, things tend to feel like you're?doing the same thing over and over again.
Kirby's Dream Land (Game Boy)

Kirby's Dream Land review (GB)

Reviewed on February 21, 2008

Without his ability-stealing powers, Kirby’s a pretty dull hero. He can gulp down some air and fly, he can spit that air at enemies and he can swallow them and their projectiles to either shoot at other foes or eat. And that’s all. He won’t pick up a sword or hammer. He can’t emit an freezing barrier to turn foes into blocks of ice. He’ll never transform into a fast-moving, laser-shooting UFO. Kirby might not simultaneously suck and blow, but those are about the only things he is capable of doing.
Tales of Legendia (PlayStation 2)

Tales of Legendia review (PS2)

Reviewed on January 31, 2008

Now, if I wanted to use a bit of tactics, I’d hit the O along with the directional pad to use one of Senel’s special attacks. And if I REALLY wanted to go overboard, I’d program a magic-user’s healing spell to either the L2 or R2 button and personally dictate when they regenerated everyone’s life. And if forcing one character to CONSTANTLY cure everyone didn’t make even the toughest boss fights pathetically easy, well, there’s Climax Mode.

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