Patreon button  Steam curated reviews  Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | AND | IOS | PC | PS4 | NS | VITA | WIIU | XB1 | All

Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by overdrive and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Deadly Towers (NES)

Deadly Towers review (NES)

Reviewed on October 18, 2007

It just isn’t fun to take novice hero Prince Meyer through corridors littered with non-threatening bouncing slime-like things — only to unexpectedly get whisked away to a maze loaded with animal-headed humanoids capable of disemboweling him with one hit. It’s really not fun to have to run aimlessly through these places in hopes that you’ll get lucky and find the exit before something kills Meyer. And it’s REALLY REALLY not fun to actually escape one of these places, only to blunder into another 15 seconds later.
Might & Magic III: Isles of Terra (PC)

Might & Magic III: Isles of Terra review (PC)

Reviewed on October 11, 2007

And those limitations make themselves known as soon as the game begins. Among the initial tasks set before players is one involving destroying the swarm of rats that’ve taken over Fountain Head, the town where the game starts. Attempting to do this immediately will likely lead to a quick demise, though, as those rats are a bit too fierce for a beginning party. Heck, even exploring the back alley’s of Fountain Head’s not advisable as there are a few slime-like critters capable of giving a group of novices a tougher fight that they might anticipate.
Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas (PlayStation 2)

Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 14, 2007

Simply put, this game is HUGE — so large that a representation of one of America’s largest cities only takes up one corner of its world. Also in the game are San Fierro (San Francisco), Las Venturas (Las Vegas) and miles upon miles of the surrounding countryside, which is loaded with farms, villages, mountains and even a top-secret military base. And very little space is wasted. During the course of play, Carl will find himself doing either mandatory or optional missions that force him to cover virtually every square inch of this vast realm.
Final Fantasy Legend (Game Boy)

Final Fantasy Legend review (GB)

Reviewed on September 07, 2007

For example, in the very first world, all a player has to do is go to three castles and get a specific item from each king to open the next few floors of the tower for exploration. One king gladly does so if the party kills a local bandit living in a tiny cave. Another fights the party for his treasure in what could be considered a mini-boss fight. The third is assassinated, leaving the party to slaughter the weak usurper and claim the third item. All of this could be done in 15 minutes — if I hadn’t had to spend a good hour or so fighting monsters to earn money for equipment and to build up my humans.
Saga Frontier (PlayStation)

Saga Frontier review (PSX)

Reviewed on September 06, 2007

So, even though I only had to do all this “magic collecting” once, I wound up choosing to do it with the majority of the other characters. That got boring pretty quickly, as the hunts for mystical runes and tarot cards are the same regardless of who is doing them.
Hydlide (NES)

Hydlide review (NES)

Reviewed on August 23, 2007

While this place is guarded by a seemingly immortal dragon, that’s of little concern to Jim, as all this beast does is go back and forth aimlessly. If Jim’s not directly in its never-changing path, it ignores him. Apparently Varalys doesn’t pay his employees enough for them to give a damn. I (typing this at work) can relate.
Ganpuru: Gunman's Proof (SNES)

Ganpuru: Gunman's Proof review (SNES)

Reviewed on August 16, 2007

Then, early in the seventh hideout, you can pick one of two sets of clothes. One greatly enhances Zero’s attack, while the other does the same to his defense. Take the first suit and no enemy, even the final boss, can stand up to his power. Grab the second and it’ll take even the toughest foes an eternity to whittle down his life meter. Considering you’ll probably have obtained a good number of extra lives by this point, it now is nearly impossible to actually die.
The Guardian Legend (NES)

The Guardian Legend review (NES)

Reviewed on August 02, 2007

Optomon doesn’t initially seem so imposing. This circular, one-eyed mass of vegetation does little but float from one side of the screen to the other while emitting bullets and unpredictable, but slow-moving, lasers. But, while pummeling the monster with everything she has, the Guardian brushes one of those lasers and watches her life bar get decimated. Suddenly, this fight has become a lot more tense as she realizes even the smallest mistake could be her last. And take my word on it — it’s easy to get so focused on dodging lasers that this critter’s weak bullets are what deals the killing blow....
Dragon View (SNES)

Dragon View review (SNES)

Reviewed on July 25, 2007

Part of the reason I found so many of the monsters to be easy to kill was because I'd wind up blundering through so many one-way doors and had to fight the same groups of enemies repeatedly that, for a good portion of the game, Alex was over-leveled for just about everything he faced.
Vapor Trail (Genesis)

Vapor Trail review (GEN)

Reviewed on July 13, 2007

In Vapor Trail you can take three hits before blowing up while your pilot’s WONDERFULLY digitized voice utters something along the lines of ”A gin olt gi!” (possible translation: “I can’t hold it!”). Oh, and this isn’t just a case of giving a player one plane that can take three hits — you have three lives, as well. Sure, the next life will start out with no weaponry beyond a weak gun, but this game still is far more generous than the average shooter.
The Legend of Silkroad (Arcade)

The Legend of Silkroad review (ARC)

Reviewed on July 05, 2007

Every single time a player loses a life and either starts their next one or continues the game, not only do all enemies on the screen get knocked down (a common procedure in these games), but they also lose a noticeable amount of life. Technically, it is possible for a player to defeat even the toughest bosses in this game WITHOUT lifting a finger. Sure, it’d be completely lame for anyone to consider this an acceptable way to win fights — but the simple fact it’s possible to advance through powerhouse foes in this manner is shocking to me.
Atelier Iris 3: Grand Phantasm (PlayStation 2)

Atelier Iris 3: Grand Phantasm review (PS2)

Reviewed on June 28, 2007

If you spend too much time aimlessly running around an alterworld, you’ll get zapped back to town before accomplishing what you set out to do. Same thing if you get into too many fights against tough foes. If you’re able to beat them in the first two turns of battle, you won’t be penalized any time, but a lot of tougher enemies are capable of lasting longer than that.
The Suffering: Ties that Bind (PlayStation 2)

The Suffering: Ties that Bind review (PS2)

Reviewed on June 08, 2007

Hand-to-hand weapons like lead pipes never need reloaded and can cause a good chunk of damage, but, come on! Do you really want to go head-to-head with a gigantic spider-like demon wielding a slew of guns with nothing more than a lead pipe? Going head-to-head with these foes as an enraged monster makes a lot more sense and you will be doing that a lot. In Ties that Bind, it’s a lot more necessary to enter Torque’s rage mode. There are a lot of rooms where his monster form is necessary to smash through walls and a few monsters are invulnerable to everything except being torn limb from limb by a big, psychotic demon.
Silver Surfer (NES)

Silver Surfer review (NES)

Reviewed on May 30, 2007

I’m not sure who Emperor is or what his powers are, but if the best he can do is stand in back of a wall of guns and immediately give up the ghost after they are destroyed....well, he’s a pretty sorry excuse for a villain. Usually, boss fights are the awesome part of superhero games, as players are going against well-known bad guys with a slew of cool abilities and powers. Here, the Surfer is taking on a bunch of (for the most part) no-name chumps that really aren’t much more than regular foes that take more damage before falling.
Final Fantasy IX (PlayStation)

Final Fantasy IX review (PSX)

Reviewed on May 11, 2007

Eventually, my favorite “mini-game” simply involved me finding all the references to early Final Fantasy games in this one. Square went above and beyond the call of duty in making sure us players got enough nostalgic moments to last any number of lifetimes. Look! It’s the classic black mage design! Hey, that old geezer’s named Garland! He was the bad guy in the original Final Fantasy!
Chou-Mahou Tairiku WOZZ (SNES)

Chou-Mahou Tairiku WOZZ review (SNES)

Reviewed on May 04, 2007

The thing is, as I played through WOZZ, I found myself becoming more and more bored as time went on until I got to the point where I had to overcome a massive internal struggle just to play long enough to get through one of the game’s many dungeons. For me, the game just doesn’t have “it”.
Baseball Simulator 1.000 (NES)

Baseball Simulator 1.000 review (NES)

Reviewed on May 02, 2007

Even ancient games like Tecmo Super Bowl proved capable of doing entire weeks of games in mere seconds. So, why does it take a good five to 10 minutes to simulate ONE game here? If you want to play two or three games at a sitting, you better have a good book on hand or you’ll be spending as much time blankly staring at your TV screen as you will playing.
Star Ocean: The Second Story (PlayStation)

Star Ocean: The Second Story review (PSX)

Reviewed on April 18, 2007

I remember easily winning one of the final boss fights with ease solely because my constant attacking was preventing him from doing much of anything. On the other hand, an earlier battle seemed near-impossible because one of my two opponents had no problems with slipping away from me and leaping into the air, immolating himself (while screaming dementedly) and slamming into the middle of the fray, creating a fiery inferno worth several thousand hit points of damage to any of my characters unfortunate enough to be in the vicinity.
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time (SNES)

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles IV: Turtles in Time review (SNES)

Reviewed on March 30, 2007

Some members of the Foot simply use their fists — others use swords, throwing stars, whips and other weapons. They all look the same, they all seem very stupid and, by about midway through the first stage, they all have worn out their welcome. Every once in a while, a handful of other foes will pop up to add a bit of diversity, but they tend to be followed by another dozen or two Foot fodder.
Dark Cloud 2 (PlayStation 2)

Dark Cloud 2 review (PS2)

Reviewed on February 28, 2007

Even worse, many of these foes have holes in their AI large enough to drive the robotic Steve through. For example, those tiny dragons can be targeted from a distance and shot from long range AND unless their random flight pattern takes them a bit closer to Max or Monica, they won’t even notice they’re getting butchered.

Additional Results (20 per page)

[001] [002] [003] [004] [005] [006] [007] [008] [009] [010] [011] [012] [013] [014] [015] [016] [017] [018] [019] [020] [021] [022] [023] [024]

Policies/Ethics | Contact | Advertise | Sponsor Guide | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2017 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.