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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Packaging Man (PC)

Packaging Man review (PC)

Reviewed on August 05, 2008

While Pac-Man is an endearing classic because of the constant challenge and addictive gameplay it provides, though, Dogwood Alliance's effort lacks the substance it needed to exist as more than a fleeting memory. It's over almost before it begins, it's ugly and there's not much value in the long term. Sort of like deforestation, I can almost imagine someone from the company quipping, and maybe he'd be right.
Hail to the Chimp (Xbox 360)

Hail to the Chimp review (X360)

Reviewed on August 05, 2008

The humor is practically non-existent with even the puns falling flat (and I usually love those). This wouldn't be a problem if the rest of the game were an improvement, but it's really not. The uninspired mockumentaries are actually the highlight of the whole affair (and double as bonus content that you can unlock). When you're a developer and the best bits in your game are rather poorly animated segments that wouldn't cut it on network television or even Cartoon Network in the early morning hours, you know that your project is seriously flawed.
Women’s Volleyball Championship (PlayStation 2)

Women’s Volleyball Championship review (PS2)

Reviewed on August 04, 2008

It's so frustratingly unpredictable that you begin to feel like you're not even playing. Why do the players respond so poorly to your commands? Why do you have so little control over where the ball goes? How is it that your teammates are more likely to excel if you just press the button once or twice per round and then leave them to their own devices the rest of the time? I just don't know, and nothing in the tutorials answered such queries.
Order Up! (Wii)

Order Up! review (WII)

Reviewed on August 02, 2008

Despite the solid selection of dishes on hand, cooking for the same motley assortment can get old after awhile and the game doesn't really offer much relief. About the only exceptions are a few mini-games. One has you flicking rats that run along the screen. Another has you quickly scrubbing plates under the eye of the watchful health inspector. Then there are the ones where you must move the Wii Remote to shake your workers awake when the going gets tough. These are nice diversions that fit the humorous cooking theme quite well, but there simply aren't enough of them to entirely dispel the monotony that is inherent to a title of this nature.
Etrian Odyssey II: Heroes of Lagaard (DS)

Etrian Odyssey II: Heroes of Lagaard review (DS)

Reviewed on July 29, 2008

As you become proficient with the tools provided, the game and its challenges evolve. You'll rely on the bottom screen to let you know where you are in relation to horrific monsters called FOEs that have wandered down the tower from much later areas. There's only one term for any of these guys the first time you meet them: badass. Surviving one round of combat is often impossible. They'll mop the floor with you. However, they can—and generally should—be avoided.
The Lost Cases of Sherlock Holmes (PC)

The Lost Cases of Sherlock Holmes review (PC)

Reviewed on July 14, 2008

Aside from the first case, which is complete filler in my opinion, the sixteen mysteries presented here are genuinely interesting. Examples include a man who takes off in a hot air balloon and crash lands after a dagger somehow finds its way into his back, a man who collapses in botanical gardens after suffering from a potentially fatal bee sting, a jewel theft on a speeding train and so forth.
Blast Works: Build, Trade, Destroy (Wii)

Blast Works: Build, Trade, Destroy review (WII)

Reviewed on July 13, 2008

The main hook in the campaign and arcade modes is the ability to attract debris to your ship and use it to your advantage. Anything you destroy within a stage (except for the boss) can be pulled to your ship and will stay with you until it has received too much damage and fallen away or until you clear a given mission. The whole process occurs automatically without any special button presses.
Trauma Center: Under the Knife 2 (DS)

Trauma Center: Under the Knife 2 review (DS)

Reviewed on July 07, 2008

There's still a learning curve for those new to the franchise, but returning veterans should be able to jump right into the action. Working too quickly is likely to lead to errors just as it should, but missed slices and injections feel like true blunders instead of something that can be blamed on faulty hit detection. As a result, tense operations feel challenging for all of the right reasons.
Overlord: Raising Hell (PlayStation 3)

Overlord: Raising Hell review (PS3)

Reviewed on July 01, 2008

Because everything is so familiar, the few twists are completely memorable. In Overlord: Raising Hell, you don't play the halfling hero. You kill him. And when a noble paladin enters the picture—Sir William the Black, they call him—you aren't there to offer a wedding toast. Your goal instead is to slaughter him like a pig. Human and sea serpent, halfling and sheep... all fall to your blade, spear, ax and sorcery.
Arkanoid DS (DS)

Arkanoid DS review (DS)

Reviewed on June 29, 2008

Basically, the game is meant to be played with vertical orientation (like Tetris). To make full use of the space provided, this means that the developers had to split the playing area in two, with dead space at the center. If you were playing this at an arcade and someone set a yardstick across the middle of the screen, the effect would be roughly the same.
GRID (PlayStation 3)

GRID review (PS3)

Reviewed on June 26, 2008

Cars simply don't handle the way they ought to. Any slight bump, any slight deviation from the road, spells disaster. Let's say you're racing along an enclosed track and one of your tires strays over the line. The second you touch dirt, you're finished. Your car cannot steer correctly at even moderate speeds when you're not completely on asphalt. You'll snake wildly in all sorts of directions—often circles—that have little or nothing to do with any buttons that you might be pressing on your controller.
Space Invaders Extreme (PSP)

Space Invaders Extreme review (PSP)

Reviewed on June 23, 2008

Special weapons add a lot of strategy to the game and are perhaps the most exciting change. Any time you slaughter four aliens of the same hue in succession, you'll receive a corresponding special shot. This is attached to a meter that quickly drains, but while you are supercharged you can unleash a triple-wide shot (green), explosive shells (red) or a devastating laser beam (blue).
Gals Panic S Extra Edition (Arcade)

Gals Panic S Extra Edition review (ARC)

Reviewed on June 22, 2008

One of the most striking differences actually won't impress a lot of folks: there are fewer bared breasts to see. The highlight of the original Gals Panic was that you could clear stages three times to finally uncover a drawing that portrayed the lovely lady of your choice with bosom exposed, smiling sweetly. Then the game would flash to a photograph of the girl that inspired the sketch—in the same pose—and that would stay on the screen long enough for adolescents to sigh adoringly before things progressed to the stage selection area. In Gals Panic S, that simply doesn't happen.
Summon Night: Twin Age (DS)

Summon Night: Twin Age review (DS)

Reviewed on June 21, 2008

Even the concern that she'll run out of magic is nullified by a skill that allows her to regenerate it on the fly—only a few seconds of charging are required, which is inconvenient but generally not lethal thanks to the invulnerability—meaning that once you progress to a certain point you won't even have to worry about purchasing restorative items. Comrades slain will revive themselves after a bit, as well, so if you're reduced to just Reiha you can play tag until the situation improves, or even stand next to the enemy repeatedly using skills so that it can't hurt you.
Time Soldiers (Arcade)

Time Soldiers review (ARC)

Reviewed on June 17, 2008

Unfortunately, every Time Soldiers triumph is canceled out by a flaw. If you don't know what you're doing, you'll find yourself repeating some areas more times than you'd care to count. That's because there are frequent warp points between the different time periods. So if you're trying to clear one zone and it's not the one you were instructed to explore, the game will let you go on your merry way... but no boss will ever appear and you'll just keep cycling through useless terrain until you catch onto your mistake and hop the next portal to a different setting.
Emergency Heroes (Wii)

Emergency Heroes review (WII)

Reviewed on June 10, 2008

Well, the way this works is that you have one of three districts—later all combined into one—where you drive through crowded traffic to find glowing columns of light that represent missions. The time spent between said missions is mostly devoid of anything worthwhile, since you can only occasionally find diversions and they can pull you away from wherever you're supposed to be headed. Worse, the traffic you must navigate is downright annoying.
Kung Fu Panda (PlayStation 3)

Kung Fu Panda review (PS3)

Reviewed on June 07, 2008

Fans of more demanding gameplay will be sad to hear that there's not really ever a moment—even at the very end—where the game grows challenging enough to test veteran gamers. There are three difficulty modes so that you can push yourself more if you're interested, but most gamers will probably like the default settings just fine. Enemies offer token resistance and death in combat won't occur often at all.
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (Xbox 360)

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian review (X360)

Reviewed on May 20, 2008

At first, I stupidly tried to battle everyone. This is a waste of time. Instead, you need to work actively on the current objective, whatever it might be. These can range from destroying siege engines, bashing stone pillars with your club (while riding on back of a lumbering giant) to simply working your way through the maelstrom to safety.
Toy Shop (DS)

Toy Shop review (DS)

Reviewed on May 19, 2008

While it's true that a lot of games of this type bury you in menus, they at least have other things going on so that you can remain entertained throughout the process or there's a sense of urgency. With Toy Shop, I would frequently set up my assembly work for the day, then just leave the DS sitting for 2 or 3 minutes while the game did its thing.
Speed Racer: The Videogame (Wii)

Speed Racer: The Videogame review (WII)

Reviewed on May 16, 2008

Speed Racer: The Videogame is fast. Really fast. Early circuits are mellow and you won't have the beefier vehicles available, but that changes quickly enough. Each completed championship yields you another driver with new stats, until you've unlocked all 20. These are the folk you'd see if you watched the movie, with voice work to match.

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