Ads are gone. We're using Patreon to raise funds so we can grow. Please pledge support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All
Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition (3DS) artwork

Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition (3DS) review


"The gameís third significant change is more difficult to pin down as either a flaw or an improvement. Since the 3DS only has so many standard buttons available, extra moves are now mapped to the touch screen (which is quartered). By default, the touch screen allows you to execute up to four special moves with a single tap of your stylus or finger. If you find such coddling insulting, you can instead set your configuration so that those touch screen functions allow you to use more standard moves and throws."



Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition is a beautiful game and a worthy purchase by any measure, but itís an especially exciting treat if you have a shiny new 3DS but nothing to play. Packed full of content and designed to take full advantage of the hardware, Capcomís handheld adaptation of the must-have console fighter is precisely the sort of title that nearly everyone hopes will arrive frequently on Nintendoís handheld once the trickle of software releases currently arriving for the platform turns into the inevitable flood.

When Street Fighter IV was released on consoles a few years back, I was ecstatic. Aside from the lack of a handful of favorite characters from Super Street Fighter 2 and Street Fighter Alpha 3, the game was a supremely polished version of everything Iíd wanted to see for years but had never dared to dream would again be available on a current platform. Then Super Street Fighter IV came along and fixed nearly every problem I had with its immediate predecessor. New fighters and old favorites all playable from the start meant that my only remaining issue was Seth, an end-game boss so incredibly cheap that now when I have to face him at the end of the Arcade mode, I just reset the system and do something else.

For better and for worse, Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition is a faithful handheld port of that generally fantastic game. The bad news is that Seth is still a total tool and the good news is that thereís still so much great content that itís hard to care. The logical part of your brain is probably saying ďBut that sort of thing shouldnít be possible on a Nintendo handheld,Ē and thatís true even with the additional horsepower that the 3DS possesses. There have been some cuts and you will definitely notice them. Youíll likely be quite surprised, though, by the limited number of compromises that the developers made.

There really are only three major differences between this new handheld version of the game and its console big brothers. The first change is that backgrounds now are almost completely static. You can still fight in familiar arenas as pieces of the background shift slightly to one side or another to produce the illusion of depth, but now there are no wildly cheering crowd members. You probably wonít miss them much.

A second and more positive change is that everything now features an added dimension. There actually are two available perspectives. You can either play with the traditional side view in effect, or you can switch to a special perspective that shifts things by around 45 degrees so that youíre practically looking over your fighterís shoulder as you pound your opponents into a pulp. While that second option does more to produce a 3D effect along the lines of something you might expect from the 3DS hardware, itís not a particularly great way to play the game; opponents tend to be more difficult to beat because itís sometimes difficult to tell what moves theyíre prepping.

The gameís third significant change is more difficult to pin down as either a flaw or an improvement. Since the 3DS only has so many standard buttons available, extra moves are now mapped to the touch screen (which is quartered). By default, the touch screen allows you to execute up to four special moves with a single tap of your stylus or finger. If you find such coddling insulting, you can instead set your configuration so that those touch screen functions allow you to use more standard moves and throws. Itís up to you.

Naturally, the new change will leave some people disgusted. It doesnít have to ruin the experience, though. Nearly anything about the game can be modified through the in-game menus and when you head online to face other opponents, you donít have to worry about someone repeatedly tapping the screen to throw a stream of fireballs at you or something because you can choose to fight only players who use the more traditional methods of control.

I found out the hard way that itís worth tweaking and saving your preferred settings immediately after you load the game for the first time. I went online for a few matches and neglected to adjust my settings, so I immediately found myself going up against someone who believed that the path to victory is paved by a steady barrage of special moves. My opponent chose Dudley and promptly demolished my character with nothing but a stream of diving punches. I refused to resort to such antics and lost as a result, but it was a relatively painless lesson to learn and I approve of the simplified control scheme even though Iím not inclined to use it myself. I just felt a little bit stupid for actually inputting proper commands to activate my special moves when it was clear that my opponent was doing no such thing. Capcom was wise to give people like me the option to avoid competing against players who abuse the simplified control scheme.

A more pressing concern--and one that a trip to the options menu wonít fix--is the gameís tendency to fall out of 3D mode if you get too excited while playing. Swinging the handheld back and forth (as is natural for scrubs like me when we play fighters) results in a lot of flickering as the game shifts in and out of 3D. The good news is that the game is perfectly playable without any 3D effect applied at all. After hours of play, I still canít get over how great everything looks.

If youíre searching for a launch-window title that has some lasting value and some technical pizzazz, look no further than Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition. The massive roster of characters and handy access to local or online matches with other players means that you can stay busy for hours upon hours if thatís what you want. The game really has no peers at this early stage in the 3DS life cycle. If you donít already own a previous version, or even if you do and you just want a competent fighting game to take with you on the road, itís difficult to imagine anything else coming out in the near future that might surpass Capcomís surprisingly polished port. With that said, many potential fans have already played a previous version of the game at great length. The lack of added content may be understandable, but itís still disappointing. You have been warned.

Rating: 9/10

honestgamer's avatar
Staff review by Jason Venter (April 11, 2011)

Jason Venter founded HonestGamers in 1998, and since then has written hundreds of reviews as the site's editor-in-chief. He also is a prolific freelancer with game reviews, articles and fiction available around the Internet.

More Reviews by Jason Venter
Professor Layton vs Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney (3DS) artwork
Professor Layton vs Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney (3DS)

The world of Labyrinthia is well worth visiting, in spite of a few missteps along the way.
Super Toy Cars (Wii U) artwork
Super Toy Cars (Wii U)

The mini-car racer is still a fun concept, but Super Toy Cars is neither refined enough nor interesting enough to justify your time and money.
Shovel Knight (Wii U) artwork
Shovel Knight (Wii U)

An attempt to revive old school sensibilities that works much better than similar efforts often do.

Feedback

If you enjoyed this Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition review, you're encouraged to discuss it with the author and with other members of the site's community. If you don't already have an HonestGamers account, you can sign up for one in a snap. Thank you for reading!

board icon
Masters posted April 11, 2011:

Hi Jason, this is a very good review that told me everything I wanted to know about the port -- especially as I'm potentially in the market for a 3DS.

Some tiny issues:

Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition is a beautiful game and a worthy purchase if you have a shiny new 3DS but nothing to play.

The opening line implies that the game is a worthy purchase if you have nothing else to play for your new system. I don't think this is what you're trying to get across with a game rated 9/10. Perhaps:

"Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition is a beautiful game and a worthy purchase especially if you have a shiny new 3DS but nothing to play."

That's not wonderful really, but the current versions seems to undercut the game's brilliance.

When Super Street Fighter IV was released on consoles a few years back, I was ecstatic. Aside from the lack of a handful of favorite characters from Super Street Fighter 2 and Street Fighter Alpha 3, the game was a supremely polished version of everything Iíd wanted to see for years but had never dared to dream would again be available on a current platform. Then Super Street Fighter IV came along and fixed nearly every problem I had with its immediate predecessor.

I think it's pretty clear you meant Street Fighter IV the first time around, and SUPER Street Fighter IV, the second.

Also, the review ends well with the warning doesn't seem to benefit from the legal letter-sounding "respond accordingly."

Just my two cents.
board icon
EmP posted April 11, 2011:

I'm going to agree with Marc for once. The review's great, but the first line is awful. It sounds like you should play SSFIV because there's nothing else to play rather than to play it on its own merits. It's a pretty derrogitory opening.
board icon
honestgamer posted April 11, 2011:

Thanks for reading and thank you for the feedback, you two! I didn't feel especially pleased with the review when I wrote it. I seem to be going through this disgustingly unenjoyable phase where I now question the value of almost everything I write, so it's nice to see constructive criticism from people who enjoyed a review and have solid suggestions for how it can be improved with a few minor tweaks. Maybe I haven't lost it yet after all. Thanks again!
board icon
Masters posted April 11, 2011:

To lose it, wouldn't that mean you had to have 'had it' at some point? BOOYAH!

I kid. The review is very good; you need to take a couple steps back.

You must be signed into an HonestGamers user account to leave feedback on this review.

Site Policies & Ethics | Contact | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition is a registered trademark of its copyright holder. This site makes no claim to Super Street Fighter IV: 3D Edition, its characters, screenshots, artwork, music, or any intellectual property contained within. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.