We're eliminating ads and looking to Patreon to secure the funding we need to grow. Please pledge your support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All
Elevator Action (NES) artwork

Elevator Action (NES) review


"I wish I could say I liked Elevator Action. If I did, I wouldn't have to justify replaying the same two levels over and over again. I wouldn't have to justify returning to it like a battered wife after it abuses me thoroughly with broken promises and the lingering smell of cheap perfume. I could move on to more amusing games, like Contra or Iron Tank. But I don't like Elevator Action, and I'm determined to stand up for myself now. "



I wish I could say I liked Elevator Action. If I did, I wouldn't have to justify replaying the same two levels over and over again. I wouldn't have to justify returning to it like a battered wife after it abuses me thoroughly with broken promises and the lingering smell of cheap perfume. I could move on to more amusing games, like Contra or Iron Tank. But I don't like Elevator Action, and I'm determined to stand up for myself now.

In Elevator Action you play the role of a hotel roaming spy in a hotel filled with evil top hat wearing double agents. You have to go to certain rooms in this hotel and collect mysterious red packages, all the while shooting your way through the double agent hordes (who I think are supposed to be communists). The elevators that the game takes its name from come into play as your main method of travel between floors. In each level, you collect each red package, and then make your way down to the hotel basement, where you escape in a stylish 70's sports car.

The gameplay plays like a toned down Contra. You can duck, shoot, jump... and you employ these moves against a cadre of endless top hat wearing baddies who duck and shoot back (they can't jump, which I assume real communists can't do either... I don't know, I haven't really done a lot of research for this portion of the review). The stairways and elevators serve to add a timing and puzzle element not unlike the Bug's Bunny Crazy Castle games, making you plan your moves a little in advance, while the constant barrage of enemies keeps things active.

My favourite, if maybe least effective move, is to jump at enemies, which results in what I think must be a jump kick worthy of Chuck Norris, because it causes enemies to instantly keel over and die (which it should be noted, isn't different from any other successful attack). It's a wildly satisfying move, even if it usually results in being gunned down on re-entry. It was worth it to know you probably kicked someone's head off.

It's these kind of mind games I find myself playing every time I plug in Elevator Action. It all sounds very exciting on page, but with limited graphical capabilities and repetitive gameplay, it all boils down to convincing yourself that what you're doing is exciting. It doesn't help that the game is set to a single 8-bit song that lasts about 10 seconds, has no musical structure, and repeats constantly throughout your gaming experience.

And yet... in a word... Elevator Action is fun. I don't know why it's fun. It shouldn't be fun. Along with the god awful music, the game is irritatingly repetitive, following the basic formula for most of the old arcade games which is: rinse, change the level color, repeat. Of course, a lot of the old arcade games are fun, too. In simplicity lies genius, I suppose.

Alright, Elevator Action. Once again, it seems, you have confounded my efforts to detach you from my heart. I came into this fully expecting to give you a 2 or 3, but you've managed to wring a 6 out of me. Oh, but this isn't over. I'll show you. One of these days I'll conveniently forget to store you in a cool dark place. Yes... revenge will be mine. Sweet, sweet, revenge.

Rating: 6/10

zippdementia's avatar
Community review by zippdementia (November 09, 2008)

Zipp has spent most of his life standing in an open field west of a white house, with a boarded front door. There is a small mailbox there. Sometimes he writes reviews and puts them in the mailbox.

More Reviews by zippdementia
Mario Kart 8 (Wii U) artwork
Mario Kart 8 (Wii U)

Mario Kart 8 is fun. It creates a racing experience that is fast-paced and full of adrenaline, while still retaining that classic Mario Kart zaniness. And that’s important, because somewhere in the last few years, the series felt like it was losing its sense of identity.
The Last of Us (PlayStation 3) artwork
The Last of Us (PlayStation 3)

Instead, Joel’s personal motives are called into question. As his protection of Ellie becomes more and more desperate, the astute gamer will not be able to escape wondering whether Joel is trying to replace his own lost family with this little girl—leading her into an unbalanced emotional reliance in the process.
Tomb Raider (PlayStation 3) artwork
Tomb Raider (PlayStation 3)

It’s impressive to see Tomb Raider go from setting up frightening encounters with wolves, to getting your blood pumping right before a shoot out, to giving your trigger-finger a break and making you get cerebral with a puzzle or two.

Feedback

If you enjoyed this Elevator Action review, you're encouraged to discuss it with the author and with other members of the site's community. If you don't already have an HonestGamers account, you can sign up for one in a snap. Thank you for reading!

You must be signed into an HonestGamers user account to leave feedback on this review.

Info | Help | Privacy Policy | Contact | Advertise | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Elevator Action is a registered trademark of its copyright holder. This site makes no claim to Elevator Action, its characters, screenshots, artwork, music, or any intellectual property contained within. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors.