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The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (Game Boy Color) artwork

The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening DX (Game Boy Color) review


"This is by-far the first Zelda game I had ever played. I was easily confused at first, and had trouble getting past the very first puzzles (that dumb mushroom). But after a little help from my peers, and my refusal to ever give up, I had one of the funnest gaming experiences. This Zelda game is an improvement upon that gameboy game, but truly they are the same, except one has color. "



This is by-far the first Zelda game I had ever played. I was easily confused at first, and had trouble getting past the very first puzzles (that dumb mushroom). But after a little help from my peers, and my refusal to ever give up, I had one of the funnest gaming experiences. This Zelda game is an improvement upon that gameboy game, but truly they are the same, except one has color.

STORY (7/10): I can't say that I love the story. You are Link, and you have been struck by lightning, while riding a boat. You go into a deep trance, in which you will sleep forever unless you wake the windfish. The story is ok, although a bit unbelievable, even for the Zelda world.

GRAPHICS (11/15): The colors are very nice on Zelda, but they are not great. They do their job, but they could have been better. The masters look pretty good, but some do not have much detail. However, you should remember this is the Gameboy, and that is practically less powerful then the nintendo.

SOUND (9/10): The traditional Zelda strength. Find me a series with as strong of music. There isn't one. And this game does its job too. The music is very nice, and one of the better for games on the gameboy soundchip. I will never know who the writer for the Zelda series is, but he is the best videogame song writer ever.

GAMEPLAY (46/50): Just like all the other Zelda's (with one exception) this game has a vast inventory. You have 2 slots, in which you can assign anything of choice too. For once, you don't have to stay with the sword at every turn (although I do love that sword). There are many puzzles to be solved in this Zelda, as much as the original. There is a major trading game, which doesn't need to be done, but would make things alot easier for you. There are seashells to collect to get the mastersword, and even the magic rod. There are many heartpieces to find, to fill up your meter. This Zelda game has alot to it, and is definitely entertaining. Did I mention that there is the ocarina too?

REPLAYABILITY (8/10): There is alot to do and find in this Zelda game, even before you beat it. You can max out your inventories by finding the little bats, and get many different weapons. Also once you beat it, you should come back for more. This game is the same however each time you play it,but it is still fun none-the-less.

DIFFICULTY (5/5): Like most Zelda's the difficulty is perfectly set. It is hard enough to make you think, but not too difficult that you have to quit playing it. I like the difficulty this game had, even though I need help from others, I was young then, and I am set for it now.

OVERALL (86/100): This is a great game, but it could've been better with better graphics and a better story. But it is definitely a great game, and deserving of being a member of the Zelda franchise. I am very fond of the history we have shared, and it is a great pickup for anyone.

Rating: 8.6/10

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Community review by ratking (Date unavailable)

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