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Wizards & Warriors X: Fortress of Fear (Game Boy) artwork

Wizards & Warriors X: Fortress of Fear (Game Boy) review


"This is the only Wizards and Warriors game I own, so I do not know how it fairs up in comparison, but I assume badly. I did not buy this game on my own, nor do I know where it came from. It's just one of about 5 gameboy games I own, where it is a complete mystery of where it came from. I wanted to see how other people reviewed it, but is uncharted territory, and I will be the first to enter it. "



This is the only Wizards and Warriors game I own, so I do not know how it fairs up in comparison, but I assume badly. I did not buy this game on my own, nor do I know where it came from. It's just one of about 5 gameboy games I own, where it is a complete mystery of where it came from. I wanted to see how other people reviewed it, but is uncharted territory, and I will be the first to enter it.

STORY (1/10): I do not have the instruction book with the game, and the game does not open with a story. It is called Chapter X, so I do not if it relates to other Wizards and Warriors game. You seem to be a knight on a quest trying to stop the evil Makil (whoever that is), would be my guess.

GRAPHICS (7/20): There are almost no backgrounds, and the few that are present are very very weak. The platforms look almost like a child painted them, but you do look like a knight. There is also little detail on the enemies.

SOUND: (2/10): If you like listening to the same song over and over, this is the game for you. There is a repetation of a medieval music throughout the game. The sound effects of the game are also weak, for you hear an annoying ''bump'' when you are hit, and a ''splash'' when you defeat an enemy. The sound of this game is very repetative.

GAMEPLAY (10/45): You jump around and stab at enemies level after level. This is a platform jumping game, where many platforms seem impossible to reach. The control of the game is pretty responsive, and you should be able to make some of the easier jumps and miss the long jumps. You also have to land on some platforms that are out of sight and hope for the best. The Gameplay is repitive and I do not think many people will be too much enjoyed. And if you do love the running and attacking game style, get Castlevania Adventure.

REPLAYABILITY (1/10): If you actually beat this game (I've barely gotten half way through it), I do not believe you will pick it back up. I will sell it to Electronics Boutique for the $2 they automatically give next time I go down, and I am no where near beating it. I've probably put around 3 hours into the game throughout time.

DIFFICULTY (2/5): Insanely hard jump after insanely hard jump. There are also snakes and bats that will get in your way, along with arrows and cannonballs (where do these come from). This game is extremely difficult, and in my mind near impossible unless you are really into this type of game.

OVERALL (23/100): I can honestly say Fortress of Fear is worth the money I put into it (all $0 I believe). I will make a profit from it, although I barely no where it came from. All in all, do not buy this game cause it is not worth any money at all. I just hope that all Wizards and Warriors games are not like this one, cause if they are, this is definitely a crappy series!!!

Rating: 2.3/10

ratking's avatar
Community review by ratking (Date unavailable)

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zippdementia posted February 20, 2009:

And this is a reviewer who is in the top ten most read on the site?!

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