Ads are gone. We're using Patreon to raise funds so we can grow. Please pledge support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All
The Hobbit (PlayStation 2) artwork

The Hobbit (PlayStation 2) review


"Bilbo Baggins, as many of us know, is a typical hobbit. Heís portly, laid-back, and perfectly content with never leaving Hobbiton. However, due to his recruitment by a wise wizard and a bunch of dwarves, Bilbo sets out on a quest where he encounters some awkward camera angles, many boring stages, and a final couple levels that hint at what could have been a much better game. So much for the epic journey I expected. "



Bilbo Baggins, as many of us know, is a typical hobbit. Heís portly, laid-back, and perfectly content with never leaving Hobbiton. However, due to his recruitment by a wise wizard and a bunch of dwarves, Bilbo sets out on a quest where he encounters some awkward camera angles, many boring stages, and a final couple levels that hint at what could have been a much better game. So much for the epic journey I expected.

It might be wrong of me, a somewhat grown man, to find fault with The Hobbit since itís aimed at the younger ones, much like the book was. Bilbo is a cute little creature with enormous eyes that seem straight out of a cartoon. Even the ďferociousĒ orcs wouldnít seem totally out of place on a Fisher-Price play set. However, Iím much in-tune with my inner child (I still buy Disney movies), so I think I can accurately gauge The Hobbit. The results arenít that promising.

Fortunately, for immature adults like me, the gameplay is somewhat more sophisticated, but not by much. Bilbo traverses through the stages by climbing vines, leaping gaps, climbing some more vines, and then occasionally uses stealth. There are plenty of side areas that grant extra experience and gold, and at the end of stage potions and upgrades can be purchased. When Bilbo isnít hopping around, heís getting in fights with lots of spiders, plants, and orcs. Thereís a lock-on system somewhat similar to that in the recent Zelda games, but the poor camera angles makes it much more convenient to frantically hack and slash while wielding a big stick or the sword, Sting. The poor camera angles also pop up a few times outside of combat. While most of the leaping from platform to platform isnít typically a problem, once in a while an awkward camera angles turns things into a blind leap of faith.

Most of the levels are somewhat similar. However, each stage manages to at least look distinct thanks to topnotch production values that include vibrant environments and rousing music. Despite the presentation, towards the end of the game I could hardly stand another repetitive stage of hacking, jumping, and vine climbing. Even though Bilbo travels with a large party of dwarves, he is almost always sent out to do all this stuff while the dwarves just sit around doing whatever it is that dwarven folk do. I was all set to drop a low score on this game and be done with it but then something unexpected happened. The stages improved. I dare say that they were exciting. I saw traces of what could have, and should have, been a much better game.

One of these excellent stages involves sneaking through a dragonís lair. Unimaginable riches are piled everywhere, making the stage look like the Cave of Wonders from Aladdin. The dragon is easily wakened, so having to step lightly ratchets up the tension. This dragon stage is also one of the few levels that actually make good use of the famous ring which grants its user invisibility. To be honest, this supposedly almighty item is mostly useless when obtained halfway through the game, with the exception of a couple areas where itís absolutely required. The haphazardly implemented invisibility is forgotten in the final stage, which turns out to be another great level. Bilbo finds himself on a battlefield with humans, elves, dwarves, and orcs fighting. As the diminutive hero fights his way through the enemies, there are plenty of explosions and shrieks of pain. If only more of The Hobbit was like this.

I suppose itís not much use dwelling on these exciting stages since they are only a tiny morsel of the entire game. Almost everything else in The Hobbit else is dull, boring, and other synonyms of the like. Itís never truly bad, so I guess thatís admirable, but now that Iíve been there, I certainly wonít go back again (see if you can catch the nerdy reference in that sentence).

Rating: 5/10

djskittles's avatar
Community review by djskittles (July 09, 2006)

A bio for this contributor is currently unavailable, but check back soon to see if that changes. If you are the author of this review, you can update your bio from the Settings page.

More Reviews by djskittles
Shadow Hearts: Covenant (PlayStation 2) artwork
Shadow Hearts: Covenant (PlayStation 2)

Forget what you learned in history class: Princess Anastasia was a feisty princess that traveled the world defeating monsters, and Rasputin sold his soul to a demon in exchange for magical powers and a sweet fortress. Also, the catastrophic casualties of World War I can be blamed on a secret society that unleashed ďm...
Brave Fencer Musashi (PlayStation) artwork
Brave Fencer Musashi (PlayStation)

Brave Fencer Musashi is a treasure trove of delightful oddities. First, thereís the amusing food obsession with locales such as Grilliní Village and characters named Princess Fillet and Ginger Elle. Next, thereís the pint-sized hero, Musashi, a pre-teen samurai with a very high opinion of himself. Factor in ot...
Final Fantasy IV (PlayStation) artwork
Final Fantasy IV (PlayStation)

Iíve played Final Fantasy games involving cute ďslam dancingĒ animals, a stupid creature called NORG, and implied man-on-man action in a notorious place called the Honey Bee Inn. What I havenít experienced is a Final Fantasy game as insanely difficult as the fourth installment. Perhaps the first couple ...

Feedback

If you enjoyed this The Hobbit review, you're encouraged to discuss it with the author and with other members of the site's community. If you don't already have an HonestGamers account, you can sign up for one in a snap. Thank you for reading!

You must be signed into an HonestGamers user account to leave feedback on this review.

Info | Help | Privacy Policy | Contact | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. The Hobbit is a registered trademark of its copyright holder. This site makes no claim to The Hobbit, its characters, screenshots, artwork, music, or any intellectual property contained within. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.