Ads are gone. We're using Patreon to raise funds so we can grow. Please pledge support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All
Evil Dead: Regeneration (PlayStation 2) artwork

Evil Dead: Regeneration (PlayStation 2) review


"The Evil Dead series is one of those things you either get or you donít. You either love it or you hate it. I, personally, love it. I even sat through ďBubba HotepĒ because Iím a huge fan of Bruce Cambell. Sorry if Iím talking about things youíve never heard of, but I just assume that a majority of people who would want to buy this game already know what Evil Dead is. Sadly, even the most loyal of fan boys are going to be disappointed with Evil Dead: Regeneration. Iím afraid to even imagine the ..."



The Evil Dead series is one of those things you either get or you donít. You either love it or you hate it. I, personally, love it. I even sat through ďBubba HotepĒ because Iím a huge fan of Bruce Cambell. Sorry if Iím talking about things youíve never heard of, but I just assume that a majority of people who would want to buy this game already know what Evil Dead is. Sadly, even the most loyal of fan boys are going to be disappointed with Evil Dead: Regeneration. Iím afraid to even imagine the reaction of the action freaks.

From beginning to end, this game is torture.

First off, unlimited ammo and an irritating, half-Deadite sidekick Sam (who looks a lot like a rotting, miniature Tony Soprano) should not garner a reason for Cranky Pants to make a sequel or give you reason to buy one. Sam is funny, but this game lasts longer than the two minutes where you might find him fresh. Hoping for something new?

Sorry. Itís all downhill from here, baby.

Evil Dead has never been known for intricate plots, so I was not surprised that Regeneration's opening sequence started in exactly the same way as the others. But rather than dive deeper into the mysteries of the Necronomicon, Regeneration only treads on an already shallow storyline. Calling it formulaic is a compliment; this gameís story is almost a mirrored image of the last one.

But redundancy dominates the entire game, not just the story--forcing you to complete the same tasks of collecting three spirits to open a door and ride a giant Deadite to break through a roadblock every level. Itís like playing solitaire in different rooms. The background changes, game stays the same. No wait, sometimes you have to kill the giant, other times he just dies.

Thatís different, right?

The only upside to this debacle is Bruce Campbell, as he once again lends his voice and (younger) likeness. His attitude is more charismatic than ever, and the graphics do his wonderful facial expressions justice. Like normal, he has a multitude of catch phrases to back up his butt-kicking persona, but even that is not enough to replace a dormant soundtrack. The only sound is banter and a few cheap noises one might find on a Halloween album.

Fascinating.

Being a huge fan of the movies, I should be the first one to back anything ďEvil Dead.Ē But Iím not cruel or crazy. This game was not worth the twenty dollars I spent on it. It wouldnít even be worth ten. I bought it in hopes for something new, but it seems like Cranky Pants lives in a fictional world where no one tires of a bland story line, boring cheap levels and a complete lack of effort. If you have Hail to the king or Fistful of Boomstick I would suggest sticking with those if youíre itching to punish Deadites. It seems like only the title has changed here.

Rating: 4/10

True's avatar
Community review by True (December 23, 2005)

A bio for this contributor is currently unavailable, but check back soon to see if that changes. If you are the author of this review, you can update your bio from the Settings page.

More Reviews by True
Golden Sun: Dark Dawn (DS) artwork
Golden Sun: Dark Dawn (DS)

They then thrust them into a meek storyline that does nothing to supplement the Golden Sun epic or answer the questions made at the end of The Lost Age, only gives you random, useless insights to the after-effects of Issac and his groupís end goal. Most of these are meaninglessówhat alchemy did to the lan...
Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood (PlayStation 3) artwork
Assassin's Creed: Brotherhood (PlayStation 3)

Even before its release, Assassinís Creed: Brotherhood was the victim of utter scrutinization. Many knew the premise, but most wondered if the ideas present werenít more than fancy add-on content. Multi-player they said. You donít need to make an entirely new game for that! Angry retort from the
Condemned 2: Bloodshot (PlayStation 3) artwork
Condemned 2: Bloodshot (PlayStation 3)

Iím the type of person who easily forgives flaws. So long as a game has one incredible, striking element I can ignore shoddy camera angles, loose controls or bad graphics. Itís a requirement that shifts depending on which genre Iím playing. For survival horror, it simply has to do one thing: terrify me. Do that, and Ií...

Feedback

If you enjoyed this Evil Dead: Regeneration review, you're encouraged to discuss it with the author and with other members of the site's community. If you don't already have an HonestGamers account, you can sign up for one in a snap. Thank you for reading!

You must be signed into an HonestGamers user account to leave feedback on this review.

Info | Help | Privacy Policy | Contact | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Evil Dead: Regeneration is a registered trademark of its copyright holder. This site makes no claim to Evil Dead: Regeneration, its characters, screenshots, artwork, music, or any intellectual property contained within. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.