Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All

foe_en_s4_b22.jpg

Street Racer (Genesis) artwork

Street Racer (Genesis) review


"Street Racer appeared on several formats in 1995, and it's the Mega Drive version under the microscope here. The brief when creating this game appeared to be to produce a racer that didn't just involve using the cars to race, and while this doesn't make for an exactly unique experience, it certainly made for a refreshing alternative for all the racing game players out there. "



Street Racer appeared on several formats in 1995, and it's the Mega Drive version under the microscope here. The brief when creating this game appeared to be to produce a racer that didn't just involve using the cars to race, and while this doesn't make for an exactly unique experience, it certainly made for a refreshing alternative for all the racing game players out there.

Of course, in today's gaming world we are flooded with cartoon racers. Crash Bandicoot's done it, Diddy Kong's done it, Mario has done it a further two times, hell, even the Toy Story characters have revved up their engines to join in the fun. Back in 1995, however, the only really well known cartoon racer was the original Mario Kart, so at the time, Street Racer seemed kinda different. And not a franchised character in sight. The characters that were available were a lovable bunch - there was Sumo San: the sumo wrestler from the future, Surf Sister: the Australian beach bunny, Hodja the old guy, and Frank the.... Frankenstein's Monster, among others (8 in total). Each character had three home courses, and a hidden course was also unlockable, meaning the number of courses available was pleasingly large.

As well as the standard championship modes, it was also possible to select which courses you wanted to use in the Custom Cup option. This added much more variety into the mix, and was a welcome addition - you could make the game longer or shorter this way, making it perfect for long sessions, or quick games before you went down the pub. Other options available were the Soccer mode, in which you used your (still car-bound) characters to play a game of football, the aim being, obviously, to score the most goals, and the Rumble mode, which came in two difficulty settings, which involved trying to knock your fellow racers off the edge of the arena. This mode, however, tended to get repetitive, and the arena seemed to become a little too empty when it was down to the last few players.

In keeping with the less serious approach, your characters came armed. In true Road Rash style, you were able to beat the life out of your opponents in your attempt to make it to the pole position. In addition, dynamite could be picked up and passed onto other players. The player holding the dynamite when it detonated ground to a halt, costing precious seconds. F-Zero style speed boosts were accumulated after each lap, and could also be picked up on the course, although unlike F-Zero there was no tactics as to when was best to use them.

The graphics and sound on this game really seemed to push the Mega Drive - you could tell that a lot of effort had gone toward making something special for the ailing console. The added bonus of four player potential meant that this became one of the Mega Drive's better party games, and added an extra sheen of quality to the mix.

At the time the game wasn't quite original, and it is even less so now, but it still manages to be great fun, and isn't that what really matters?

Rating: 8/10

tomclark's avatar
Community review by tomclark (March 06, 2004)

A bio for this contributor is currently unavailable, but check back soon to see if that changes. If you are the author of this review, you can update your bio from the Settings page.

More Reviews by tomclark
Rayman: Raving Rabbids (Wii) artwork
Rayman: Raving Rabbids (Wii)

A console launch can cover a multitude of sins. At any other stage in a machines life, games that are blatantly a bit crap receive no attention, and head straight for Bargain Bucket Hell. And rightly so. But when a console is preparing to launch, every game that is heading it's way receives a slice of the spotlight - e...
Taz in Escape from Mars (Genesis) artwork
Taz in Escape from Mars (Genesis)

Out of all the classic cartoon characters, The Tasmanian Devil is arguably one of the more forgettable. The fact that you could never understand what the lil' bugger was saying meant that he didn't convey quite as much character as old favourites like Bugs or Daffy. That isn't to say that people haven't heard of, or wo...
Cosmic Spacehead (Genesis) artwork
Cosmic Spacehead (Genesis)

Cosmic Spacehead... with a name like that the hero of this game from Codemasters was born to be an intergalactic explorer. So it's no surprise to see that that's exactly what he's up to here, although what is reasonably surprising is the manner in which he's going about it. Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you an exa...

Feedback

If you enjoyed this Street Racer review, you're encouraged to discuss it with the author and with other members of the site's community. If you don't already have an HonestGamers account, you can sign up for one in a snap. Thank you for reading!

You must be signed into an HonestGamers user account to leave feedback on this review.

Info | Help | Privacy Policy | Contact | Advertise | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Street Racer is a registered trademark of its copyright holder. This site makes no claim to Street Racer, its characters, screenshots, artwork, music, or any intellectual property contained within. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors.