Ads are gone. We're using Patreon to raise funds so we can grow. Please pledge support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All
Time Lord (NES) artwork

Time Lord (NES) review


"Time Lord was released in the Milton Bradley range of games (that included the similarly under-appreciated Digger T. Rock), and received only minimal attention when it came out. I too was among the crowd who really didn't pay this game it's due at that time. I was given this game the same Christmas that I was given Mega Man 2, and I spent so much time on Mega Man's game that Time Lord was given only a few courtesy plays before being put aside for nearly a year. Then, one Autumnal evening, I pick..."



Time Lord was released in the Milton Bradley range of games (that included the similarly under-appreciated Digger T. Rock), and received only minimal attention when it came out. I too was among the crowd who really didn't pay this game it's due at that time. I was given this game the same Christmas that I was given Mega Man 2, and I spent so much time on Mega Man's game that Time Lord was given only a few courtesy plays before being put aside for nearly a year. Then, one Autumnal evening, I picked up Time Lord and played it properly for the first time. All I can say is.... wow!

First off, for all the Doctor Who fans out there, the 'Time Lord' of the title is not the titular Time Lord of that show (unless he's developed a ruthless streak, a muscular frame and a penchant for red vests, in which case the show sure has changed since I last watched an episode!). What the plot does involve is the aforementioned red-vested one travelling through various timezones collecting Orbs in order to foil an alien invasion in the year 3000. Basically this amounts to a beat-em-up with incredible variety in the levels. After a level set in our hero's 'present', that is little more than a prologue, we are transported to a mediaeval castle, a town in the Old West, and so on right through to the Second World War, before returning to 300 to presumable kick alien butt. Yay!!

As mentioned, these levels see you hunting for small red orbs, the locations of which grow steadily more obscure as the levels pass. Four of these can be found in the levels themselves, while the other is in the possession of the level boss. Speaking of bosses, from level two (three counting the prologue) onwards the end-of-level villains have a heart-warming difficulty about them. I have often stated that I miss the difficulty factor that seemed to die out with the advent of the 32-bit systems. If you feel the same way I do then the Old West level's boss will be perfect for you! The game also features a nice touch in which you only have a year to complete your quest, although that is a year in your 'present', and so time moves faster there than in the past (don't ask, just accept), placing a very strict time limit on the game. Brilliant!

The graphics are nothing to write home about (even by NES standards) - it looks like the NES's crusty geriatric beat-em-up Kung-Fu, only with improved backgrounds (scratch that - it's like Kung-Fu, but with backgrounds), although some of the bosses are quite impressively large. The music, too, is fairly uninspiring on the whole, although I must confess that I still on occasion find myself humming the tune that accompanies the Castle level.

Despite the poor presentation (even taking into account the year it was made) this game is unavoidably likeable, to me at least, and it's pure old-school beat-em-up gameplay is sure to win over even the latest generations of gamers. If you like a good challenge then give this game a try (if you can still find it) - don't let it pass you by as I so nearly did.

Rating: 9/10

tomclark's avatar
Community review by tomclark (February 02, 2004)

A bio for this contributor is currently unavailable, but check back soon to see if that changes. If you are the author of this review, you can update your bio from the Settings page.

More Reviews by tomclark
Rayman: Raving Rabbids (Wii) artwork
Rayman: Raving Rabbids (Wii)

A console launch can cover a multitude of sins. At any other stage in a machines life, games that are blatantly a bit crap receive no attention, and head straight for Bargain Bucket Hell. And rightly so. But when a console is preparing to launch, every game that is heading it's way receives a slice of the spotlight - e...
Taz in Escape from Mars (Genesis) artwork
Taz in Escape from Mars (Genesis)

Out of all the classic cartoon characters, The Tasmanian Devil is arguably one of the more forgettable. The fact that you could never understand what the lil' bugger was saying meant that he didn't convey quite as much character as old favourites like Bugs or Daffy. That isn't to say that people haven't heard of, or wo...
Cosmic Spacehead (Genesis) artwork
Cosmic Spacehead (Genesis)

Cosmic Spacehead... with a name like that the hero of this game from Codemasters was born to be an intergalactic explorer. So it's no surprise to see that that's exactly what he's up to here, although what is reasonably surprising is the manner in which he's going about it. Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you an exa...

Feedback

If you enjoyed this Time Lord review, you're encouraged to discuss it with the author and with other members of the site's community. If you don't already have an HonestGamers account, you can sign up for one in a snap. Thank you for reading!

You must be signed into an HonestGamers user account to leave feedback on this review.

Info | Help | Privacy Policy | Contact | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Time Lord is a registered trademark of its copyright holder. This site makes no claim to Time Lord, its characters, screenshots, artwork, music, or any intellectual property contained within. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.