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Quest: Brian's Journey (Game Boy Color) artwork

Quest: Brian's Journey (Game Boy Color) review


"Quest 64 was a very dissapointing game, but it did not end up destroying the series. Instead Quest: Brian's Journey would finish the failure of Quest 64. While neither of these games were terrible, they were met with horrendous critics. The only thing Quest: Brian's Journey had going for it, is that most people never even realized it existed. I only found it used, and because I was searching for it. See, Brian's Journey was released, but never survived on the shelves long. Within a month many vi..."



Quest 64 was a very dissapointing game, but it did not end up destroying the series. Instead Quest: Brian's Journey would finish the failure of Quest 64. While neither of these games were terrible, they were met with horrendous critics. The only thing Quest: Brian's Journey had going for it, is that most people never even realized it existed. I only found it used, and because I was searching for it. See, Brian's Journey was released, but never survived on the shelves long. Within a month many videogame stores had it out of stock, but not because of popularity. Nobody ever asked for multiple shipments, cause the game was just not that good, and here is why...

STORY (6/15): As an RPG, story plays a crucial role. In Quest: Brian's Journey the story is present, in the search of the four powerful stones (wind, Earth, fire, water... Same as every RPG) and for his lost father. In the end he will have to defeat a great magical boss, the same story present in nearly EVERY RPG. Also this story is just taken from Quest 64, so if you have played that, then this is no different. Overall there was a story, but with little detail, and as ordinary and predictable as it gets.

GRAPHICS (6/10): I will not rate the graphics too harshly, because they are restrained by the Gameboy Color's graphical ability. They actually do not look that bad, although the color is kinda bland for the flourescent world that Quest is placed in. The characters look fairly round, although many look fairly identical to others. The world is fairly different at various times, like the caverns; some are covered with ice, others with the typical rock formations. They may get confusing within each area though, and you will find yourself lost. That might not be a graphical problem, though...

SOUND (4/10): The sound is either non-existant, repetive, or annoying. Now and then you will get a catchy tune, but even those are subpar. The caverns have gloomy repetitive music, that will be apparent of all dungeons of that type. Other times you can't hear the music at all, and it gives just a sense of boredom. Lastly some dungeons just have idiotic, ear splitting annoying music. What fun, huh?

GAMEPLAY (24/50): Quest is the same exact type of game that Quest 64 was. At first you will dependant on hitting opponents with your staff. All this requires is pressing ''A'' next to your given up, and Brian will do his quick attack. As the game goes on, the staff becomes useless against certain enemies, and is no longer the most efficient method of disposing of enemy creatures. That is when the other important part of Quest: Brian's Journey comes into play, the magic. Brian has a very large magical list of spells at his disposal as he levels up. This is very useful, because there are attacking, healing, and powering up spells available, all with their own advantages and uses. The spells are fun at first, but in the end you will find yourself dependant on one spell instead of a variety.

Quest is a simple game in which you travel through forests and dungeons like every RPG. The dungeons are just random battles, no puzzles or anything like that. While I am no fan of the puzzles, Quest is just too forward and linear. It does not seem to have that enjoyment when you pass any point, cause the next point is nearly identical to it. Quest just doesn't have those fun dungeons, or quests.

REPLAYABILITY (3/10): The game gets to become a chore as you near the end, however you might have the dedication to complete that chore. I did complete the chore, and I was grateful to see it end. However, when I did see it end, do you really think I had any desire to pick it back up? I did not, and I wonder if I ever will. I guess if you have a desire to see the game through again, you will, but overall the replayability is low.

DIFFICULTY (5/5): The one strength in Quest: Brian's Journey is the game is not that difficult, nor that simple. At times you may need to level up, to become powerful enough to beat that crucial boss or find a way through that dungeon. However it will not become an endless leveling up, like some games (cough, Final Fantasy Legend 2, cough). The game itself is fairly difficult, but you should not be stuck on any certain area too long.

OVERALL (48/100): Quest: Brian's Journey was not a famous game, nor should it have been. It had it's flaws, and was not nearly as fun as it could've been. As an RPG it fails as bad as many that I have ever played. It isn't a total failure though, because there is a great system of magic, in which there are numerous spells at your disposal and an easy method of reaching each spell during battle. The game is difficult, but beatable, and at times almost enjoyable. I do not reccomend it's purchase, but I also do not reccomend it's banning from the gaming world. It's a bad game, but not a terrible one...

Rating: 4.8/10

ratking's avatar
Community review by ratking (April 18, 2003)

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