Ads are gone. We're using Patreon to raise funds so we can grow. Please pledge support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All
Super Solvers: Treasure Cove (PC) artwork

Super Solvers: Treasure Cove (PC) review


"After Treasure Mountain, Outnumbered, Mathstorm, and Ancient Empires the Learning Company wanted to put up one last classic before vanishing from the scene. That game was Treasure Cove, which was basically the same as Treasure Mountain and Mathstorm, but underwater. This game was nearly as addictive as its predeccesor, and helped teach that same early education, although at the time I got this game it was very simple (seeing I was about 7, and the questions are made for like 5 year olds). "



After Treasure Mountain, Outnumbered, Mathstorm, and Ancient Empires the Learning Company wanted to put up one last classic before vanishing from the scene. That game was Treasure Cove, which was basically the same as Treasure Mountain and Mathstorm, but underwater. This game was nearly as addictive as its predeccesor, and helped teach that same early education, although at the time I got this game it was very simple (seeing I was about 7, and the questions are made for like 5 year olds).

STORY (5/5): Treasure Cove has the strongest story of the series, although the Super Solvers collection was never really strong in that category. The Master of Mischief has destroyed the Rainbow bridge, and his goobies are polluting the sea. Your job to collect the gems, stop the goobies, and restore the great Rainbow Bridge.

GRAPHICS (9/10): This is the most colorful of the entire series, as the environment is huge and some are bright, and others a gray gloominess that will make your kids jumps. There is a huge variety of different fish in the game, and those cool looking sharks near the end too. The fish all have fixed movements, and they do fit eachother well. Plus the goobies, they are the coolest looking black globs I have ever seen.

SOUND (7/10): The sound of Treasure Cove is what you expect from a PC game, that will not work on a system that has Windows. It's a collection of beeps that create an atmosphere of underwater. How is that possible? I really don't know, but from those simple beeping music you really do get a feel of the ocean. There is about five different tracks throughout the entire game, that will do the game nicely.

GAMEPLAY (54/60): You are a scuba diver, and the control are simple. Instead of just being able to move side to side you can also swim up and down vertically. Once again you have the light beam at your disposal, to stun power goobies and try to figure out where the need gems are to move on in the stage. Gems are also needed to use this light beam, so be don't just start beaming at everyone.

The game itself is very similiar to Treasure Mountain. You will use Gems to find stars, answer questions to get clues, and then use those clues to find the needed item to move to the next level. You also will hvae to avoid the goobies and sharks who will try to stop you, as they are minions of the master of mischief. The game itself is fun, cause each play through takes about 15 minutes, and really not nerve racking although some of the questions will be tricky, and your child will need to use his brain for a change.

REPLAYABILITY (7/10): This is the area where Treasure Cove is supposed to dominate like every other Super Solver game has done so (besides Outnumbered). The game is addictive, and I played all 500 games through, and finished putting back together the grand rainbow bridge, and boy that took me years. But as far as addictive go, for a series that is based on this category, Treasure Cove is just not as addictive as Treasure Mountain or Ancient Empires. This game is fun, and you will play it alot if you are into this type of thing (and are fairly young), but some day you will likely just grow out of it.

DIFFICULTY (5/5): The question get harder the more times you play the game, and the closer you are to finishing the Rainbow bridge. So while at first a 5 year old will be cruising through, at the end your now 8 year old kid will be racking his brains tryign to figure out the answers to these questions. That is how games should work; get more difficult as they go along.

OVERALL (86/100): Treasure Cove is a game I highly respect, just like every game in the Super Solver series. Once again Treasure Cove shows how education can be fun, and that the Learning Company has that ability to MAKE education fun. I can tell you, if my teachers were as appealing as the Learning Company, I'd be happy to be going to school. Although this will have to do for now, trying to develop a method to play classic games for completely outdated computers. Treasure Cove in a game that is infinitely difficult to find, so if you do get your hands on it, I would reccomend not letting it go.

Rating: 8.7/10

ratking's avatar
Community review by ratking (February 12, 2003)

A bio for this contributor is currently unavailable, but check back soon to see if that changes. If you are the author of this review, you can update your bio from the Settings page.

More Reviews by ratking
Star Fox Assault (GameCube) artwork
Star Fox Assault (GameCube)

The Star Fox team first appeared on the Gamecube in a platform game, called Star Fox Adventures. While, many considered it a quality game (and others a subpar game) it never really felt like a true Star Fox game, despite the occasional flying (simple stages). Namco, however, introduced the true sequel to the classic St...
Jak 3 (PlayStation 2) artwork
Jak 3 (PlayStation 2)

Jak II was one of those experience that every gamer either absolutely loved or completely loathed. The game strayed from everything the first Jak game stood for, in that it took a much serious outlook, and it based itself more on the GTA series, that it's own original concept. Jak III does not change any of that, as it...
Jak II (PlayStation 2) artwork
Jak II (PlayStation 2)

Jak and Daxter was a platforming game based on exploration, simple fight patterns, cool minigames, and lush colorful scenery. All that has changed in Jak II, for no longer is the Jak series perfect for kids of all ages and instead this game is only a little less intense version of Grand Theft Auto.

Feedback

If you enjoyed this Super Solvers: Treasure Cove review, you're encouraged to discuss it with the author and with other members of the site's community. If you don't already have an HonestGamers account, you can sign up for one in a snap. Thank you for reading!

You must be signed into an HonestGamers user account to leave feedback on this review.

Info | Help | Privacy Policy | Contact | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Super Solvers: Treasure Cove is a registered trademark of its copyright holder. This site makes no claim to Super Solvers: Treasure Cove, its characters, screenshots, artwork, music, or any intellectual property contained within. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.