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Review Archives (Staff Reviews)

You are currently looking through staff reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Battlefield: Bad Company 2 (PlayStation 3)

Battlefield: Bad Company 2 review (PS3)

Reviewed on April 23, 2010

The game's limited scope comes with a pleasing silver lining, however: destructible environments. Games have made attempts along those lines in the past, but Bad Company 2 takes the beautiful chaos to an unusually involving level. For example, one stage finds the player holed up in a wooden shack as a tank and gunmen approach from the far side of a field. It's possible to duck behind the wooden walls, then to peak out and fire shots at the approaching goons. Hiding out offers only limited protection, though. Your enemies will shred your shelter with bullets, until finally you're standing in a husk of your former stronghold. That's not an isolated example, either.
honestgamer's avatar
Sakura Wars: So Long, My Love (PlayStation 2)

Sakura Wars: So Long, My Love review (PS2)

Reviewed on April 22, 2010

One definitely has to give credit to the Japanese for their ability to appeal to a wide range of sexual tastes. Thereís a female here for everyone. Thereís the plucky and inexplicably clumsy redhead, the big-breasted and flirtatious blonde maid, the fiery black-skinned beauty, and a ten year-old. These, and other women, will team up with the Japanese hero to form the Combat Theater Revue to promote justice through the art of song and dance... and occasionally through dedicated missile strikes.
zippdementia's avatar
Resonance of Fate (PlayStation 3)

Resonance of Fate review (PS3)

Reviewed on April 21, 2010

For the most part, this battle system works wonders and it lends Resonance of Fate a fair portion of its charm. When you're able to stop thinking about all of the strategy that goes into perfectly executing a massive assault on powerful enemies, you're able to stop and (mostly) enjoy some of the most visually stimulating combat ever featured in a JRPG. You're characters run, jump, flip and whirl through interactive arenas, participants in a bullet-riddled ballet.
honestgamer's avatar
Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Conviction (Xbox 360)

Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Conviction review (X360)

Reviewed on April 19, 2010

Where Conviction diverges from its predecessors is in pacing. Guards in previous titles didnít know what they were up against; at the playerís discretion, they often didnít even know they were up against anything at all. On the flipside, Fisherís enemies in Conviction know exactly who he is. They know his reputation. They scream profane threats at him when they can feel him in their midst. They donít like him, but the feeling is mutual. Fisher is no longer a patient, calculating government agent. He is a rogue operative uncovering a conspiracy involving the death of his daughter and heís out for blood.
Suskie's avatar
Blue Toad Murder Files: The Mysteries of Little Riddle (PlayStation 3)

Blue Toad Murder Files: The Mysteries of Little Riddle review (PS3)

Reviewed on April 14, 2010

If you've heard of Blue Toad Murder Files: The Mysteries of Little Riddle, it was probably mentioned in the same breath as the Professor Layton series, and for good reason. Blue Toad Murder Files takes obvious inspiration from the Professor Layton games. As one of four detectives from the Blue Toad Agency, you arrive in the town of Little Riddle at the beginning of the first episode. Almost immediately, you witness the murder of the town's mayor (the game is called Blue Toad Murder Files, after all). From there, you're tasked with wandering from place to place, questioning people and solving random puzzles until they eventually lead you to the killer.
Roto13's avatar
Major League Baseball 2K10 (Xbox 360)

Major League Baseball 2K10 review (X360)

Reviewed on April 12, 2010

When batting, you will have to be patient in identifying pitches, rather than taking a rip at everything thrown. Pitchers often straddle the outer-edge of the strikezone, and a batter caught trying to pull a ball way out there will often tap weak grounders to the pitcher and second baseman.
dogma's avatar
Sylphia (Turbografx-CD)

Sylphia review (TGCD)

Reviewed on April 11, 2010

Sylphia throws so much at players early on, but somehow still keeps producing surprising new opponents for every level. This is not native Japanese mythology, but the designers immersed themselves in the spirit. Winged gargoyles carry crossbow-wielding Spartans. A skeleton charioteer -- one horn broken from his ram's head helmet -- whips at you from afar. The flying chariot is pulled by manticores instead of horses. It's as though the developers stole some child's sketchbook and made a game based off of it. It's as though they stole my sketchbook.
zigfried's avatar
Nostalgia (DS)

Nostalgia review (DS)

Reviewed on April 10, 2010

Itís nice to just pick up an RPG that doesnít have you sitting through hours of pretentious dribble about how Villain X used to be valiant and brave until Fate stepped in and cock-slapped them, and play it.
EmP's avatar
Project: Snowblind (PlayStation 2)

Project: Snowblind review (PS2)

Reviewed on April 10, 2010

While there's never really a place in Project: Snowblind where stealth is a necessity, it's always an option. And I have to admit, I do feel a certain sense of satisfaction when my creeping through ducts grants me the opportunity to gun down a couple of unsuspecting soldiers who were lying in wait for me to come nonchalantly strolling down that wide-open corridor.
overdrive's avatar
Light's End (Xbox 360)

Light's End review (X360)

Reviewed on April 02, 2010

This mechanic lends Lightís End a unique feel; thereís no battle engine to be found or any statistics to build; itís purely a character-based puzzler where you need to jump from differing perspectives throughout the game to keep the story moving along.
EmP's avatar
World Cup Of Pool (DS)

World Cup Of Pool review (DS)

Reviewed on March 31, 2010

Unfortunately, the inclusion of sixty stellar pros boils down to displaying a still photo before each match, because the computer certainly doesn't play like any of those big names. It fails to execute smart safeties. It will ignore tailor-made combinations that would result in a win. Worst of all, it simply flubs easy, straight-in shots. I've never seen it come close to running a rack.
woodhouse's avatar
The Red Star (PSP)

The Red Star review (PSP)

Reviewed on March 30, 2010

The Red Star stands on its own, with or without the name and skin based on the comics. It just doesn't stand very well.
Roto13's avatar
Fret Nice (PlayStation 3)

Fret Nice review (PS3)

Reviewed on March 28, 2010

This exhausting ingenuity may be the most memorable piece of Fret Nice, but it doesn't make the game alone. It gets help from colorful landscapes that beg for exploration. Neither, though, is the gimmick what breaks it. That's left to control decisions that have nothing to do with the guitar.
woodhouse's avatar
Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening (PC)

Dragon Age: Origins - Awakening review (PC)

Reviewed on March 28, 2010

When you install Awakening and start a new game, you're presented with the choice of either playing the original Origins campaign or the new expansion. Unfortunately it's a pretty easy choice to make.
frankaustin's avatar
Fragile Dreams: Farewell Ruins of the Moon (Wii)

Fragile Dreams: Farewell Ruins of the Moon review (WII)

Reviewed on March 27, 2010

Given time, you will eventually adapt to all of those quirks. Even when you've grown accustomed to the overly simplistic and repetitive combat, the awkward flashlight and camera controls and the ridiculous inventory system, however, Fragile Dreams can surprise you with just how obtuse it can really be. As you progress through the game, you'll find yourself forced to backtrack to locations where you've already been (after finding the proper key, of course) or you'll have to chase a mischievous prankster around an amusement park or whatever else the game throws your way.
honestgamer's avatar
Darwinia+ (Xbox 360)

Darwinia+ review (X360)

Reviewed on March 26, 2010

With the introduction of spiders, things rapidly became more difficult. I had to rely on grenades to damage them, as they seemed immune to laser fire. Making that difficult was their habit of suddenly pouncing at my unit when within range. Until I'd really enhanced my grenade-throwing range and could blast them before they noticed my squad's presence, they were able to decimate squads with ease.
overdrive's avatar
Metro 2033 (Xbox 360)

Metro 2033 review (X360)

Reviewed on March 25, 2010

Developed by 4A Games, a splinter of Ukranian studio GSC Game World, Metro 2033 is nothing like Stalker. That's one of the most important things to remember when entering its dismal tunnel network, or sprinting across its harsh, destroyed surface world. It may share some pretty heavy thematic elements with that series, and it might emerge from the same brains, but Metro 2033 is its own game: more bombastic shoot-'em-up than slow-burning, open-world survival.
Lewis's avatar
Chronicles of Mystery: The Tree of Life (PC)

Chronicles of Mystery: The Tree of Life review (PC)

Reviewed on March 23, 2010

The Tree of Life lays the groundwork for an interesting revelation, keeps you busy with roundabout nonsense, and then glosses over the juiciest part. When the time comes to reveal true identities and lay motivations bare, the conspirators drone on with obtuse conversations that fail to explain the whole truth of the matter.
woodhouse's avatar
Red Steel 2 (Wii)

Red Steel 2 review (WII)

Reviewed on March 23, 2010

When the swordplay comes together as intended, there's no feeling better. You'll face a lot of thugs as you seek your resolution. They come at you from all sides wielding swords of their own, or guns or hammers or protective shields. Routing the evil gang members feels satisfying because you're not simply swinging the Wii Remote around in place of furious 'A' button mashing. The speed and actual motion of each swing is reflected on-screen with surprising precision and with in-game consequences.
honestgamer's avatar
Thexder Neo HD (PlayStation 3)

Thexder Neo HD review (PS3)

Reviewed on March 22, 2010

Enemies come at you fast, but luckily your laser beam has homing capabilities, so you neednít even aim to bring them down. Being successful is more a function of edging forward gradually enough to bring the enemies onto the screen slowly enough for the beam to melt the bad guys before they reach your face.
Masters's avatar

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