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Review Archives (Staff Reviews)

You are currently looking through staff reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Rock Band Blitz (PlayStation 3)

Rock Band Blitz review (PS3)

Reviewed on September 03, 2012

Rock BandVille
Roto13's avatar
Seirei Shinseiki Fhey Area (Sega CD)

Seirei Shinseiki Fhey Area review (SCD)

Reviewed on September 02, 2012

Fhey Area was a tranquil land of warmth and peace, governed by a benevolent king and protected by a gentle goddess . . . until the demons came. A foul army of ghoulish creatures gathered beneath the blood-red sky, lighting the very ground ablaze as they ransacked village after village. This narrated introduction sets an unoriginal but appropriately dramatic stage for Wolf Team's very first Mega CD RPG.
Kenshiru's avatar
Sleeping Dogs (PlayStation 3)

Sleeping Dogs review (PS3)

Reviewed on September 02, 2012

By the end of the game, the combat system has expanded to offer the level of depth you’d more typically expect to find in a dedicated fighting game. Counters, arm breaks, grapples, jump kicks, stuns, and even the environment all can be used to Wei’s advantage. It’s possible to pick up items and wield them as weapons, or to grab a foe and (for example) toss him over the side of a building or shove his face into a whirling fan blade.
honestgamer's avatar
Legasista (PlayStation 3)

Legasista review (PS3)

Reviewed on August 26, 2012

When you’re not advancing the plot, you’ll spend a lot of your time in random dungeons. Those dungeons are really the heart of the game, much like the Item World is in Nippon Ichi Software’s own Disgaea series. They come in several tiers, and you can choose which one you want right from the start by digging a hole in the hub area that serves as the dungeon entrance. When you’re first starting out, you’ll need to find a 30-floor area with weak foes, but puny adversaries don’t yield many experience points.
honestgamer's avatar
Brothers in Arms: Hell's Highway (Xbox 360)

Brothers in Arms: Hell's Highway review (X360)

Reviewed on August 24, 2012

It's the story of a group of men who just happen to be in in the middle of the world's most brutal war. It pulls no punches in sending them through hell.
EmP's avatar
S.C.A.T.: Special Cybernetic Attack Team (NES)

S.C.A.T.: Special Cybernetic Attack Team review (NES)

Reviewed on August 24, 2012

I also feel I must note that it takes a certain lack of imagination to put together a game this short and still waste one of the available boss encounters on a generic shooter snake. What makes it even worse is that this generic shooter snake is generic even by generic shooter snake standards, since all it does is meander on and off the screen while occasionally releasing a homing missile.
overdrive's avatar
Tales from Space: Mutant Blobs Attack (PC)

Tales from Space: Mutant Blobs Attack review (PC)

Reviewed on August 24, 2012

Tales of Gluttony
Roto13's avatar
Test Drive: Ferrari Racing Legends (Xbox 360)

Test Drive: Ferrari Racing Legends review (X360)

Reviewed on August 20, 2012

This game has a great concept, and there's even quite a bit of love put into the campaign mode's setup. Unfortunately, its engine cripples the entire product.
Pixel's avatar
Sengoku Denshou (Sega CD)

Sengoku Denshou review (SCD)

Reviewed on August 20, 2012

Sengoku is a trippy brawler that inserts samurai and folklore demons into modern-day Japan, interrupted by a few interludes where the player leaps up into heaven to fight even more monsters. This bizarre series of events is explained as being due to Nobunaga Oda. That clears everything up.
Kenshiru's avatar
Little Ninja Brothers (NES)

Little Ninja Brothers review (NES)

Reviewed on August 18, 2012

There are random encounters, for instance, but they don’t appear in the manner you might expect. Battles take place in real time on various battlefields. Basic stones serve as obstructions and ponds act as HP-draining traps. While negotiating such hazards, you must deliver knuckle sandwiches of justice to unruly beasts and wicked ninjas.
JoeTheDestroyer's avatar
Papo & Yo (PlayStation 3)

Papo & Yo review (PS3)

Reviewed on August 17, 2012

Because alcoholics can be monsters, guys! Get it? Do you get it!?
Roto13's avatar
Bubble Bobble (NES)

Bubble Bobble review (NES)

Reviewed on August 17, 2012

*pop*
Roto13's avatar
New Super Mario Bros. 2 (3DS)

New Super Mario Bros. 2 review (3DS)

Reviewed on August 14, 2012

Suddenly, until you either clear the current stage or you are struck by an enemy, you fire shots that turn bricks and enemy projectiles into coins. Usually, there are lots of bricks in short proximity. Diving through piles of gold like Wario taking a swan dive into Scrooge McDuck’s money bin is definitely an exhilarating experience.
honestgamer's avatar
Retro/Grade (PlayStation 3)

Retro/Grade review (PS3)

Reviewed on August 14, 2012

*wepwepwep wep wep*
Roto13's avatar
Wreckateer (Xbox 360)

Wreckateer review (X360)

Reviewed on August 11, 2012

It’s a functional and fun time killer when, let’s face it, we all expected a trainwreck.
EmP's avatar
Heroes of Ruin (3DS)

Heroes of Ruin review (3DS)

Reviewed on August 10, 2012

"WHERE. ARE. MY. ALLIES!?"
Roto13's avatar
Ghosts 'N Goblins (NES)

Ghosts 'N Goblins review (NES)

Reviewed on August 08, 2012

I also probably shouldn't forget how you need one particular weapon to simply damage the final boss. Or that if you do manage to kill it, you find out that you were the victim of a cruel hoax and have to do the six main levels over again (at a higher difficulty level, of course) and then fight that guy again in order to actually beat the game. Adding the fake difficulty of a mandatory second trip through an already brutal game is not my idea of fun.
overdrive's avatar
California Games (NES)

California Games review (NES)

Reviewed on August 05, 2012

I once wasted most of a week doing nothing but playing California Games and attempting to perfect each of the six included sporting events. Just like I did more than two decades ago, I see quite clearly how the game could have been awesome. The problem is that it failed spectacularly. Each of the included diversions—half pipe, foot bag, surfing, skating, BMX and flying disk—have enough issues that the kindest compliment you might pay any of them is “semi-competent.”
honestgamer's avatar
Donkey Kong Classics (NES)

Donkey Kong Classics review (NES)

Reviewed on August 05, 2012

For those keeping score at home, Donkey Kong Classics features an underwhelming total of seven levels—spread out across the two included games—and none of them take up more than a single screen. That means that you can quite handily see everything unique that the game has to offer in less than a half-hour of play. Endurance runs in pursuit of a higher score (which the cartridge doesn’t even save once you power off the system) are your only reason to keep going from there.
honestgamer's avatar
Duck Tales 2 (NES)

Duck Tales 2 review (NES)

Reviewed on August 05, 2012

A lot of the challenge this time around comes from bottomless pits. The first game generally placed you in a relatively safe environment where you would typically die only if you ventured too far off the beaten path in search of treasure, or if you let enemies knock you around a bit too much. There were occasional hazards that spelled instant death, certainly, but levels were designed in a manner that welcomed newcomers.
honestgamer's avatar

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