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Review Archives (Staff Reviews)

You are currently looking through staff reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Cyber-Core (TurboGrafx-16)

Cyber-Core review (TG16)

Reviewed on October 27, 2003

An opening ‘cinema’ educates us on the state of the world. Hyper-insects (where is your Ritalin cannon when called upon?) have taken over the Earth, and it is your responsibility to repel them. And what better way than to merge your repulsive character Rad Ralph with the equally repulsive Chimera super life form?
Masters's avatar
China Warrior (TurboGrafx-16)

China Warrior review (TG16)

Reviewed on October 27, 2003

Remember Kung Fu for your old NES? Think hard and it will all come rushing back to you. It was a punch, kick and jump side-scroller, and it featured amateur martial artists who would rush at you so they could hug you to death. Occasionally, one of them had the wherewithal to wield a stick, or toss a knife at you. Well! With the advent of 16-bit power back in 1989, things only got worse. Witness China Warrior.
Masters's avatar
Bloody Wolf (TurboGrafx-16)

Bloody Wolf review (TG16)

Reviewed on October 27, 2003

When I was younger, I loved war games. You name it, and it was sure to have a special place in my cold, iron, war-lovin’ heart. From the classic Contra, to the underrated Cabal, to the mostly silly Guerilla War, to the two-faced Bloody Wolf… what was so irresistible about waging a one man campaign against armies of gun and grenade toting insurgents? Reflecting, I have come to realize that the shoot-em-up fan in me was gradually making the transition from platformer cuteness to cosmic dogfights. War games, what with their platformer-esque heroes, and their shooter themes of inexorable projectile slipping, provided a seamless segue.
Masters's avatar
Castlevania: Lament of Innocence (PlayStation 2)

Castlevania: Lament of Innocence review (PS2)

Reviewed on October 25, 2003

Try not to stare as you walk through a chapel and see some benches upright, some tossed to their sides, and still others draped by cobwebs. Everything looks so tremendously organic. There's also a lot of color variation. Even though textures are reused throughout, they're all so good that it doesn't really impact anything in a negative way. Even better, there's good variety from one locale to the next.
honestgamer's avatar
Shadow of Destiny (PlayStation 2)

Shadow of Destiny review (PS2)

Reviewed on October 21, 2003

Dying is never fun. Knowing you're about to die is even less of a joyful prospect. But worst of all perhaps, is knowing you're going to die again and again and again. Such is the fate of Eike Kusch. That's you, in case you were wondering.
Masters's avatar
Disgaea: Hour of Darkness (PlayStation 2)

Disgaea: Hour of Darkness review (PS2)

Reviewed on October 18, 2003

In short, Disgaea: Hour of Darkness is the sequel that might have happened if Square weren't developing for the Game Boy Advance at the time. Then again, it may not have. You see, the game has all kinds of personality that we haven't seen from Square in, well... forever.
honestgamer's avatar
Boktai: The Sun Is in Your Hand (Game Boy Advance)

Boktai: The Sun Is in Your Hand review (GBA)

Reviewed on October 09, 2003

Imagine the Metal Gear Series if it joined forces with Castlevania, and some crazy scheme to get indoor-bound gamer-geeks out in the sun, where their pale skin will sizzle and pop...And you should get an idea of the general concept behind Boktai: The Sun is in your Hand.
ender's avatar
SoulCalibur II (GameCube)

SoulCalibur II review (GCN)

Reviewed on October 06, 2003

Rather than force you to face nine million matches to unlock all the hidden characters and their alternate weapons, Namco went the story-based route. When you first begin this mode, you appear on a map and get to read some text. This leads to a battle with an opponent, where you'll quickly learn the basic moves that make up a typical fight. From there, you advance onto the next area, where there's more story to read and an excuse for another fight.
honestgamer's avatar
Otogi: Myth of Demons (Xbox)

Otogi: Myth of Demons review (XBX)

Reviewed on October 06, 2003

Otogi is really in a league of it’s own on Xbox. The closest game to it is probably Panzer Dragoon Orta, not because the action is similar but because both games deliver such a unique audio/visual impact backed with challenging, addicting gameplay.
goatx3's avatar
SoulCalibur II (PlayStation 2)

SoulCalibur II review (PS2)

Reviewed on October 05, 2003

When playing in Extra Arcade, you can change what weapons your characters use in battle, provided you have obtained new ones. This can greatly affect how balanced a fighter your character is. Tamil can find a weapon, for example, that lets her take out anyone almost without effort, or she can pick a different weapon that has some attributes that are great and some that are a disaster. It's amazing how many ways Namco found to keep gamers playing.
honestgamer's avatar
F-Zero GX (GameCube)

F-Zero GX review (GCN)

Reviewed on October 04, 2003

As with the attacks, knowing when and how to perform each of these turns is vital during a race, since, depending how it turns out (pun sadly intended), a turn can lose or gain crucial seconds during a lap—consider, of course, that the difference between first and second is often a mere tenth of a second.
Knux's avatar
Enter the Matrix (Xbox)

Enter the Matrix review (XBX)

Reviewed on October 03, 2003

To be fair, the Focus idea is cool. It's a great way to put the player in control of what feels almost like a superhuman character. In this one regard, the game succeeds. The problem is that there's not much to do with it. You're just doing the same thing you were before, but now everything isn't as fast and visibility is low. There aren't suddenly more opponents and the environments don't suddenly morph to the point where they're interesting.
honestgamer's avatar
The Simpsons: Hit & Run (Xbox)

The Simpsons: Hit & Run review (XBX)

Reviewed on September 29, 2003

In the later stages, in the interests of raising the difficulty bar, the developers force you to drive from point A to point B in almost perfect form, then probably to point C in even less time, and perhaps even to point D. Sound tedious? It can be. And if you mess up, it's back to point A for a rehash.
honestgamer's avatar
Silent Hill 2 (PlayStation 2)

Silent Hill 2 review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 16, 2003

You can't escape the fear… but you'll keep running anyway. And running and
Masters's avatar
Silpheed: The Lost Planet (PlayStation 2)

Silpheed: The Lost Planet review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 16, 2003

Silpheed was never good. Never mind the great stories you hear passed down by your big brother or uncle or whoever. As a Sega CD title, it looked great (is that really saying much?)--ahead of its time even--but it was never a good vertical shooter. With that in mind, Silpheed: The Lost Planet is a worthy sequel! It looks positively smashing and debonair, all decked out in smooth as oil polygons, but it's severely lacking in the substance department.
Masters's avatar
R-Type (TurboGrafx-16)

R-Type review (TG16)

Reviewed on September 10, 2003

Love it or hate it...the Bydo alien armada is threatening to misbehave, and ‘time out’ has failed to make the intended impression. So the fate of the free world rests on the shoulders of an untested contingency plan. Yes, the R9 spaceship in your control represents our lone retort against waves of alien menaces (no pressure).
Masters's avatar
Fantasy Zone (TurboGrafx-16)

Fantasy Zone review (TG16)

Reviewed on September 10, 2003

She's been around, but you’ll want to plug it in anyway...
Masters's avatar
Psychosis (TurboGrafx-16)

Psychosis review (TG16)

Reviewed on September 10, 2003

Absolute beauty that lies just past your unconscious, right under the skin...
Masters's avatar
Pirates of the Caribbean (Xbox)

Pirates of the Caribbean review (XBX)

Reviewed on September 08, 2003

Or if you're feeling particularly daring, you can find contraband on one island, then head to the tavern on another and set up a secret liason with some smugglers. Here, your luck comes into play, and perhaps your ability to handle yourself on land in more of those annoying melee battles, but it's easy to save just before trying to make the deal. Though it feels cheap, you'll soon find that if you save just before any minor skirmish, you can just replay it until you're satisfied with the outcome.
honestgamer's avatar
One Piece Mansion (PlayStation)

One Piece Mansion review (PSX)

Reviewed on September 05, 2003

Each such room represents an apartment within the complex, and you'll see the occupants doing their thing. Of course, their thing might interfere with the something the guy to the left or right enjoys. That's what One Piece Mansion is all about, then: keeping everyone in each of the rooms happy with the people around them.
honestgamer's avatar

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