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Review Archives (Staff Reviews)

You are currently looking through staff reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Beyond the Beyond (PlayStation)

Beyond the Beyond review (PSX)

Reviewed on June 18, 2003

I can say without a hint of malice that I've always liked the towns in such 16-bit titles, and that they are present in full force in Beyond the Beyond. Each town does look different from the next. Years later, there is the slim possibility you'll find yourself remember your first trip through that one town at night, or the descent into the volcano, or that pyramid I mentioned before.
honestgamer's avatar
Skies of Arcadia Legends (GameCube)

Skies of Arcadia Legends review (GCN)

Reviewed on June 14, 2003

I found myself hooked into the story almost immediately. You're given a mystery of sorts to investigate in the very first scene--who is this girl in the strange clothes? Why is she here? And it just gets more interesting from there.
lassarina's avatar
Armored Core 3 (PlayStation 2)

Armored Core 3 review (PS2)

Reviewed on June 03, 2003

Enemy AI is drastically improved this time around. Your opponent will hide behind objects and use various fighting styles, requiring you to plan your method of attack based on what you know about your foe.
Arekusu's avatar
Brute Force (Xbox)

Brute Force review (XBX)

Reviewed on June 02, 2003

Brute Force would benefit so much from more open level designs. Your tactical options would exponentially increase and your enemies could do something useful like flank you, or ambush you, bringing much more excitement into the game.
goatx3's avatar
NBA Street Vol. 2 (GameCube)

NBA Street Vol. 2 review (GCN)

Reviewed on May 21, 2003

This isn't a basketball sim, the players don't behave like real players. Shaq will hit the occasional shot from behind the arc, little Allen Iverson will throw down 360 dunks. Just about any player in the game will hit a mid range jumper with at least 80% accuracy, so getting points on the board is pretty simple
goatx3's avatar
.hack Part 2: Mutation (PlayStation 2)

.hack Part 2: Mutation review (PS2)

Reviewed on May 19, 2003

Old characters return, but they're hardly involved. Mia, in fact, only shows up in one mission with a reference to a practical joke from the previous game. Her presence here is token, as is the presence of the majority of the cast. It's quickly becoming evident that the story here is really revolving around Kite and BlackRose.
honestgamer's avatar
Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow (Game Boy Advance)

Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow review (GBA)

Reviewed on May 15, 2003

Aside from the soul-absorption ability, you can also pick up weapons! That's right, just like in Symphony of the Night, the main character can arm himself with swords, axes, maces, even a gun.
ender's avatar
The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time / Master Quest (GameCube)

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time / Master Quest review (GCN)

Reviewed on May 15, 2003

For veterans of the original, the dungeons become all new challenges (sometimes extremely frustrating ones), with different sequences necessary for progression and a horde of remixed enemies throughout—for instance, where there might have been a few keese in Ocarina of Time, there now stands a Stalfos.
Knux's avatar
Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow (Game Boy Advance)

Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow review (GBA)

Reviewed on May 13, 2003

Nothing feels particularly refreshing. You've seen all the tricks before, they impressed you at the time, and now there's this overwhelming sense of deja vu. Some of the absolute coolest bosses in the game, for example, feel like they were ripped straight out of Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. Which makes sense, as they obviously were.
honestgamer's avatar
Rayman 3 (Game Boy Advance)

Rayman 3 review (GBA)

Reviewed on May 01, 2003

Even more impressive are the numerous environments he'll explore. These for the most part are swamps, lava caves, and fortresses, but they all look vibrant. The level of detail is also amazing. Then there are the enemies to consider. Their animations also are impressive, to the point where you sometimes must watch them in order to determine when it's safe to attack.
honestgamer's avatar
Conflict: Desert Storm (Xbox)

Conflict: Desert Storm review (XBX)

Reviewed on April 28, 2003

Conflict Desert Storm has plenty of those exciting moments that you just can't find in other genres. You're low on ammo, separated from your squad, relatively hidden in a small group of boulders. There's a tank rolling towards you on the left, enemy infantry overrunning your position. What do you do? WHAT DO YOU DO??? I live for these moments - CDS delivers them in bunches.
goatx3's avatar
Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon (PlayStation 2)

Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon review (PS2)

Reviewed on April 26, 2003

No, multi-player doesn't truly shine until you unlock cooperative levels. This is done by completing those same levels in the single-player mode. Once that's done, the game suddenly doubles in value. Whenever a new friend comes over, the two of you can take on some missions together and lose a few hours without even realizing they went anywhere.
honestgamer's avatar
Super Puzzle Fighter II (Game Boy Advance)

Super Puzzle Fighter II review (GBA)

Reviewed on April 24, 2003

While you're puttering about on your half of the screen, your opponent is on the other side doing the same thing. Whenever you score a combo or string of combos, blocks will be rained down on your opponent. These blocks do not solidify for around 4 or 5 drops of other blocks, yet they quickly build up on the screen and make things difficult for your dastardly foe.
honestgamer's avatar
Metroid Fusion (Game Boy Advance)

Metroid Fusion review (GBA)

Reviewed on April 24, 2003

A general situation is that you save and refill your life, find a new boss, die, return with a strategy, die after almost winning, then come back a third time and find victory. There's never a feeling that the game is handing you the next upgrade on a silver platter, and only seldom are you likely to feel truly overwhelmed. Even then, victory might be yours the next time you try.
honestgamer's avatar
Panzer Dragoon Orta (Xbox)

Panzer Dragoon Orta review (XBX)

Reviewed on April 21, 2003

Orta takes everything its predecessors had to offer, polishes it until it shines, and then fancies it up with glitter paint and elbow macaroni. It’s just as breathtaking, just as intricate, just as feature-laden, and (wait for it…) even as challenging as the Panzer Dragoons that came before it. What’s that? Do you doubt me? Well, you can decide for yourself, because it even includes the original Panzer Dragoon in its entirety as a bonus!
richorosai's avatar
Project Gotham Racing (Xbox)

Project Gotham Racing review (XBX)

Reviewed on April 17, 2003

In about every racing game out there, speed is the most important thing. You drive fast, you get to the finish line first in order to win. And that makes sense, right? They ARE racing games after all. Project Gotham Racing is rather different. You still have to win races, but driving like a badass is just as important as driving with speed. It’s really as much a driving game as it is a racing game.
goatx3's avatar
Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Game Boy Advance)

Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers review (GBA)

Reviewed on April 15, 2003

The sheer size of The Two Towers, the number of levels and the fact that there are five different characters make this an extremely impressive title for a portable system. Yet at the same time, the levels often seem empty and needlessly long.
alecto's avatar
Strikers: 1945 (PlayStation)

Strikers: 1945 review (PSX)

Reviewed on April 14, 2003

Everything remains steady the whole way through, even when enough sprites are flying around the screen that the sweating geek inside of you cringes and expects smoke to start pouring out of the Playstation. It's amazing to see so much solid detail to the levels and so many projectiles peppering the environment, but no noticeable drop in framerate.
honestgamer's avatar
The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker (GameCube)

The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker review (GCN)

Reviewed on April 09, 2003

The entire sailing element is a love-hate sort of experience: if you don’t mind occasionally spending five minutes crossing the entire ocean to get from point A to point B or constantly changing the direction of the wind, then you can easily dismiss the potential frustration and realize that it is actually a rather fun experience, and simply exploring the ocean, finding all the islands and their respective objectives, is actually enjoyable.
Knux's avatar
The Three Stooges (Game Boy Advance)

The Three Stooges review (GBA)

Reviewed on April 07, 2003

While it makes sense to port the flagship games of the Nintendo, Super Nintendo and Genesis, which featured gaming icons like Mario, Sonic the Hedgehog and Earthworm Jim, one has to wonder what sort of logic was behind the decision to port The Three Stooges, an obscure NES game based on characters from a fifty year old black & white television show.
alecto's avatar

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