Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All

Review Archives (Staff Reviews)

You are currently looking through staff reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews

Mega Man & Bass (Game Boy Advance)

Mega Man & Bass review (GBA)

Reviewed on March 23, 2004

Though the levels themselves aren't much longer than areas encountered in Mega Man 4 and its like, the ease with which you traverse each environment has been radically altered for the worse. Bottomless pits fill almost every room, and spikes and giant enemies that swarm you at every opportunity. Even the simplest of enemies do terrible damage if they brush against you, and the cramped quarters mean that all of them are much harder to avoid than you might expect.
honestgamer's avatar
Summoner: A Goddess Reborn (GameCube)

Summoner: A Goddess Reborn review (GCN)

Reviewed on March 22, 2004

Since most enemies will take around ten hits to kill, battle quickly becomes a matter of exchanging blows, parrying, watching for an enemy opening, then repeating. Misjudge your opponent and you'll take quite a bit of damage. Not only that, but enemies will soon tire of head-on attacks and will decide to circle. Suddenly, you're dealing not only with an enemy opponent, but also the horrific camera.
honestgamer's avatar
1080° Avalanche (GameCube)

1080° Avalanche review (GCN)

Reviewed on March 22, 2004

As a result, your relationship with a new level goes as follows: first you start playing and almost invariably lose by a large margin, then you start to memorize things and lose by only a hair (your boarder may even appear to have won, even though he or she didn't), then you'll effortlessly win almost every race as you fully memorize the obstacles. The challenge in the game is derived almost completely from the player's lack of familiarity with a given course.
honestgamer's avatar
Wheel of Fortune (NES)

Wheel of Fortune review (NES)

Reviewed on March 20, 2004

None of this matters, though, compared to a careful dissection of Vanna's role in the game. It's obvious Rare's developers thought a lot of her. Watch closely as she saunters casually across the screen, flipping letters and looking nothing like her real-life counterpart. Another nice touch is that if a letter is more than halfway across the group, she'll walk to the opposite end of the puzzle, while if it's not, she only heads out to the letter, flips it, then returns lazily to her original position.
honestgamer's avatar
Amplitude (PlayStation 2)

Amplitude review (PS2)

Reviewed on March 17, 2004

The system works astonishingly well, because it grows quite difficult to leap from track to track. Making sudden changes can throw off your groove, so to speak. Sometimes, tracks are just too far out of range. This means that you need to anticipate your moves. See two tracks with score multipliers waiting ahead? One of them is going to make it easier to reach the multiplier that lies beyond, while the other will make such a stretch next to impossible.
honestgamer's avatar
Choaniki: Sei Naru Protein Densetsu (PlayStation 2)

Choaniki: Sei Naru Protein Densetsu review (PS2)

Reviewed on March 13, 2004

In this era of remakes and resuscitations, I suppose this game shouldn't have been a surprise — but still, Super Big Brother is one of the last series I expected to rise from the ashes... ashes formed from developer NCS-Masaya's dead, burning corpse. Point is, Legend of the Holy Protein features sexy-awesome style and its frenetic action should be enough to turn on any hardcore Psikyo shmup fan.
zigfried's avatar
Mickey Mousecapade (NES)

Mickey Mousecapade review (NES)

Reviewed on March 11, 2004

Even if you have a fairly simple stage, such as the forest, you'll soon find the developers have worked overtime to irritate you. Proceeding through the forest requires shooting almost every tree to reveal hidden doorways. As you progress, you'll enter a door and the season and enemies change. This is a nice touch. But the minute you enter a door in the wrong order, it's back to the start for you.
honestgamer's avatar
T&C Surf Designs (NES)

T&C Surf Designs review (NES)

Reviewed on March 10, 2004

There appears to be no set limit, either; you just keep skating as things grow increasingly difficult, until you've messed up too much and the game ends. The real fun is to challenge yourself for score. It's possible to average around 10,000 points a stage, for example, but as you get into the later zones this grows increasingly risky. Topping 100,000 points is actually quite difficult. Because you're scored based on time remaining, health icons gathered, and life remaining, there's a lot of challenge.
honestgamer's avatar
R-Type Final (PlayStation 2)

R-Type Final review (PS2)

Reviewed on March 06, 2004

But it's worth all the agony, the memorization, and the sweaty palms, because there's little in the world of videogames that can compare to the feeling that you're 'in the zone' as you weave effortlessly through scores of enemy bullets and ships. Not only that, but this is one of the best looking shooters ever crafted.
honestgamer's avatar
EVE Burst Error (PC)

EVE Burst Error review (PC)

Reviewed on February 28, 2004

The strength of Eve Burst Error lies in how the pieces are assembled, revealing just enough to keep you excited without spoiling the surprises yet to come — and let me tell you, the writers really like to mess with your mind.
zigfried's avatar
Super Off Road: The Baja (SNES)

Super Off Road: The Baja review (SNES)

Reviewed on February 26, 2004

If you race long enough to build up a good supply of nitro, races can take on quite the frantic pace. You'll zip along the roads, weaving between plants, around four-wheelers, and through groups of other trucks. There are plenty of small hills and streams to rush over, so it's great fun to see how long you can zip along the rough terrain before hitting so many obstacles that your truck is ruined.
honestgamer's avatar
Everything or Nothing (GameCube)

Everything or Nothing review (GCN)

Reviewed on February 26, 2004

James can fire a wide variety of weapons, rappel down the sides of buildings, skydive, pilot helicopters and cars and motorcycles. Some of these actions feel almost like separate games. The quality is that high. Yet everything is implemented in a nearly seamless fashion to form the type of quilt that can wrap you up and keep you warm all winter.
honestgamer's avatar
The Fairly OddParents: Breakin' Da Rules (GameCube)

The Fairly OddParents: Breakin' Da Rules review (GCN)

Reviewed on February 21, 2004

Though it's not so much the case in the early stages, the pathetic double jump is going to provide numerous moments of frustration as players try to navigate architecture that absolutely requires high-precision jumps over bubbling lava, bottomless pits, and whatever else the game chooses to throw at you. Even in cases where a jump doesn't result in the instant loss of a life, it's likely to force you to backtrack and try the jump again... and again, and again.
honestgamer's avatar
Final Fantasy X-2 (PlayStation 2)

Final Fantasy X-2 review (PS2)

Reviewed on February 19, 2004

On the one hand, it is made by Square Enix and says FF in the title. The dressphere system sounded like a really cool variation on the various FF games that have included job classes (FF1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and Tactics to name some.) I was intrigued. On the other hand, FFX-2 looked a whole lot like ''Let's play dress-up!'' and Yuna's new costume made me skeptical. I absolutely could not picture the uncertain, apologetic Lady Summoner running around a la Lara Croft, and I really wanted to know how Square Enix was justifying the transformation.
lassarina's avatar
Viewpoint (NeoGeo)

Viewpoint review (NEO)

Reviewed on February 17, 2004

Well, even by Neo Geo standards it doesn't actually look brilliant if you observe carefully. But the VIEWPOINT makes things look decidedly 3D, and the polygons are shaded so brightly and nicely, in a generally non-threatening fashion, so the overall look is brilliant. I was very impressed when I first beheld this game in action.
Masters's avatar
Metroid: Zero Mission (Game Boy Advance)

Metroid: Zero Mission review (GBA)

Reviewed on February 14, 2004

With that said, I was also happy to see that this game doesn't lead you by the hand to the same degree that Metroid Fusion did with its 'computer' set-up. It's still quite possible to get lost and wonder where you should head next. The map might tell you that it's time to approach Kraid's lair, for example, but that doesn't mean you can just take a few passages and find yourself at the encounter; you'll have to locate hidden chutes and such all by yourself.
honestgamer's avatar
Verytex (Genesis)

Verytex review (GEN)

Reviewed on February 10, 2004

Area three takes us back 'outdoors', over Earth perhaps, high enough to skip through the clouds, but low enough to witness clearly the wake of alien conquest. Surely this 'ravaged metropolis' scene is shooter cliché, but decent execution of it never ceases to bring some degree of profound humanity to any blastathon. Regrettably, the crumbling buildings here are nondescript and repetitive, like the houses that whiz by seen through Fred Flintstones' windows as he runs through his own home.
Masters's avatar
XDR: X-Dazedly-Ray (Genesis)

XDR: X-Dazedly-Ray review (GEN)

Reviewed on February 02, 2004

XDR stands for X-Dazedly-Ray. I couldn't have made that up if I tried. I mean, dazedly? What the hell is that all about? And I love how designers Unipac hyphenated the parts, as if that makes the whole somehow make sense. They would have done better to allow the three letters to keep their mystery! That would have afforded us the opportunity to discuss the possibility of the name's origin in clandestine instant messenger chatrooms, or else on shadowy, cultish internet boards dedicated to talking up bad shooters based solely on their obscurity! But Unipac ruined it for us.
Masters's avatar
Activision Anthology (PlayStation 2)

Activision Anthology review (PS2)

Reviewed on January 31, 2004

Activision was kind enough to include scans of original instruction manuals, and it's fun to see the lame covers that decorated these early classics, if you're not lucky enough to own them yourself. Not only that, but I guess back in the day there were patches you could earn for good gameplay. Those are included here, too, and you can unlock them the same as always: by kicking butt and taking names.
honestgamer's avatar
WarioWare, Inc: Mega Microgame$! (Game Boy Advance)

WarioWare, Inc: Mega Microgame$! review (GBA)

Reviewed on January 30, 2004

If there's one flaw in the whole presentation, it's that sometimes the games begin so quickly, you don't really have time to react to your surroundings. You'll start to mess up more than you would if you had time to get your bearings. Of course, the frantic pace throughout is the reward for putting up with this apparent lack of polish, and it overwhelms any general objections one might have to the game as a whole.
honestgamer's avatar

Additional Results (20 per page)

[001] [002] [003] [004] [005] [006] [007] [008] [009] [010] [011] [012] [013] [014] [015] [016] [017] [018] [019] [020] [021] [022] [023] [024] [025] [026] [027] [028] [029] [030] [031] [032] [033] [034] [035] [036] [037] [038] [039] [040] [041] [042] [043] [044] [045] [046] [047] [048] [049] [050] [051] [052] [053] [054] [055] [056] [057] [058] [059] [060] [061] [062] [063] [064] [065] [066] [067] [068] [069] [070] [071] [072] [073] [074] [075] [076] [077] [078] [079] [080] [081] [082] [083] [084] [085] [086] [087] [088] [089] [090] [091] [092] [093] [094] [095] [096] [097] [098] [099] [100] [101] [102] [103] [104] [105] [106] [107] [108] [109] [110] [111] [112] [113] [114] [115] [116] [117] [118] [119] [120] [121] [122] [123] [124] [125] [126] [127] [128] [129] [130] [131] [132] [133] [134] [135] [136] [137] [138] [139] [140] [141] [142] [143] [144] [145] [146] [147] [148] [149] [150] [151] [152] [153] [154] [155] [156] [157] [158] [159] [160] [161]

Info | Help | Privacy Policy | Contact | Advertise | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party.Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors.