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Review Archives (Staff Reviews)

You are currently looking through staff reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Mobile Train Simulator + Densha de GO! Tokyo Kyuukou Hen (PSP)

Mobile Train Simulator + Densha de GO! Tokyo Kyuukou Hen review (PSP)

Reviewed on February 22, 2005

But firstly, how does one go about breaking the stigma associated with such games? I could drone on about the anal retentive attention to detail required of players in order to meet the strict schedules of the Tokyo to Yokohama express lines, that however certainly isn't going to help my situation any. Perhaps then we should start with Mobile Train Simulator + Densha de GO!'s realistic good looks...
midwinter's avatar
Metroid: Zero Mission (Game Boy Advance)

Metroid: Zero Mission review (GBA)

Reviewed on February 21, 2005

Aliens attack lone woman. Sexy results.
bluberry's avatar
Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater (PlayStation 2)

Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater review (PS2)

Reviewed on February 20, 2005

No massive conspiracies revolving around a staged oil spill and its subsequent cleanup structure, no horribly wrong talk of genetics and cloning, just a cool backstory that gives you a reason for being there and a reason for kicking ass.
bluberry's avatar
Hitman: Contracts (PlayStation 2)

Hitman: Contracts review (PS2)

Reviewed on February 19, 2005

Only once you finally access your unwitting target is brutality essential. Be it a 7.62mm NATO round to the heart, a poison-loaded sip of vintage Springbank, or just a silk pillow held over the breathing passages, it's that moment of perfect catharsis - when the ragdoll body slumps and the objective status politely flicks to completed - that the Hitman series has always been defined by.
autorock's avatar
OutRun2 (Xbox)

OutRun2 review (XBX)

Reviewed on February 19, 2005

Though your car flips end-over-end after a collision and lands on the roadway pointed exactly where you need to drive, such diversions cost you precious seconds you canít possibly afford to lose. While your female passenger looks at you and asks you what youíre doing, or if youíre going to give up, youíll find yourself mashing the accelerator in frustration, to no effect. But this isnít a flaw in the gameís design. It simply means you need to drive better.
honestgamer's avatar
WarioWare: Touched! (DS)

WarioWare: Touched! review (DS)

Reviewed on February 18, 2005

With only a few exceptions, this is all done with your stylus. Thatís what differentiates this game from the original in the franchise. Adapting to the new style wonít take you long at all, and suddenly youíll wonder how you ever played this sort of thing before (assuming you have, of course).
honestgamer's avatar
Magic Knight Rayearth (Saturn)

Magic Knight Rayearth review (SAT)

Reviewed on February 17, 2005

Rayearth's story is certainly one of growth and discovery, but it's hardly carefree. Despite the cutesy girls' fantasy trappings, this is an unmistakably mature adventure...
zigfried's avatar
Metal Wolf Chaos (Xbox)

Metal Wolf Chaos review (XBX)

Reviewed on February 15, 2005

Thankfully though the action is a standard mix of slam, bam, thank you ma'am with just the right blend of high yield ka-pow. Viewed from a suitably panoramic third person perspective, players are taken on a veritable cross country tour of the United States, hitting all the major landmarks with an impressive amount of gusto and force.
midwinter's avatar
Gradius V (PlayStation 2)

Gradius V review (PS2)

Reviewed on February 13, 2005

Do we really need a Gradius that dares to be different? Sometimes the best in life can get no better, and if you decide to play God for a day then bad things have been known to happen. It's as such that Gradius V is best served as being a 12-gun salute to the past rather than the true sequel its name would seem to suggest.
midwinter's avatar
Gradius V (PlayStation 2)

Gradius V review (PS2)

Reviewed on February 12, 2005

Despite its positive elements, though, it's tough to recommend Gradius V when the mechanics and boss encounters of even decade-old Genesis shooters are substantially better.
bluberry's avatar
Prince of Persia: Warrior Within (Xbox)

Prince of Persia: Warrior Within review (XBX)

Reviewed on February 08, 2005

It's this apparently apathetic lack of true care that Prince of Persia: Warrior Within will be remembered for the most. Whereby the original stood out from the crowd with its polished gameplay and abundant good charm, its sequel comes off as a mere rehash, made to order in a paint by numbers fashion for the early Christmas rush.
midwinter's avatar
Swords & Serpents (NES)

Swords & Serpents review (NES)

Reviewed on February 07, 2005

Like I said, thereís not an in-depth plot. The game is more about exploration and the occasional adrenaline rushes that come from knowing youíre only surviving by the skin of your teeth. It is the very definition of Ďdungeon crawler,í and embodies most everything you may dread about that phrase. If youíre one of the few who lives for this sort of thing, though, Swords & Serpents is one of the best the NES ever saw.
honestgamer's avatar
Kiwi Kraze (NES)

Kiwi Kraze review (NES)

Reviewed on February 07, 2005

No matter what your surroundings, though, the game doesnít provide a lot of variety in terms of mechanics. Youíre still just running through one level after another (mostly swimming between underwater pockets of air in the case of the aquatic world I mentioned), firing your bow to take out the other animals. Some of these leave behind other weapons, such as ray guns that let your shots pass through walls, or bombs you can fire in arches to hit enemies below you.
honestgamer's avatar
City Connection (NES)

City Connection review (NES)

Reviewed on February 03, 2005

The problem is that all the timing in the world may not always be enough to save you. This is because some of the enemy sprites move so quickly and come so unexpectedly from off screen that only lightning-fast reflexes will save you. Worse, you have to be at the right level in order for an oil can shot to do any good.
honestgamer's avatar
The Simpsons: Bartman Meets Radioactive Man (NES)

The Simpsons: Bartman Meets Radioactive Man review (NES)

Reviewed on February 03, 2005

Youíll have to ride portable gun turrets throughout most of the stage, often down shafts where a slightly short jump (a move all too easy to execute, unfortunately) spell certain doom. But suppose you survive these just fine. There are still the occasional weak enemies that can easily decimate your entire life meter.
honestgamer's avatar
Deja Vu: A Nightmare Comes True (NES)

Deja Vu: A Nightmare Comes True review (NES)

Reviewed on February 01, 2005

Wine cellars, back room casinos and more serve to set the plot somewhere just after Prohibition ended. Throw in a few alleys that connect everythingóyou canít just walk boldly down the street when youíre wanted, after allóand you still donít have more than what amounts to perhaps a city street or two. Itís only the secret passages and such that make this quest feel any larger than it is.
honestgamer's avatar
Ape Escape Academy (PSP)

Ape Escape Academy review (PSP)

Reviewed on February 01, 2005

The problem is though, try as they might, monkeys are not very good at imitating other people. Sure, dressing one up in a suit and giving it a cigarette may make us all smile, but its constant ass slapping and habitual masturbation is hardly the definition of quality entertainment. And that becomes an all too fitting caveat made doubly relevant once Piposaru Academia gets underway.
midwinter's avatar
The Legend of Zelda (NES)

The Legend of Zelda review (NES)

Reviewed on January 31, 2005

Link moves with the elfish grace you might expect from his size. A quick thrust of the sword is enough to vanquish most foes, and when itís not a secondary slash will do (at least, throughout most of the game). All he has to fear is the stream of fireballs Hyruleís mermaid-like monsters launch from various rivers and lakes, as only a magical shield can deflect such attacks. Later, there are some projectiles even that armament wonít defend against.
honestgamer's avatar
Snake Rattle 'N Roll (NES)

Snake Rattle 'N Roll review (NES)

Reviewed on January 31, 2005

To reach the archway you see at the very top, you must zig-zag your way along a series of jumps. You leap forward, grinning because you know you canít possibly miss the landing. And then you do. And again, and again. Many of these jumps arenít straight, either. Some require you to wrap your way around a cliff mid-air. The problem is, itís often hard to tell which move is required.
honestgamer's avatar
Kimi ga Nozomu Eien (PC)

Kimi ga Nozomu Eien review (PC)

Reviewed on January 29, 2005

Kimi ga Nozomu Eien really comes alive in the second half. While the prologue always stuck Takayuki with Haruka, you can match him up with any of seven girls here, although some ó like Haruka's really cute little sister Akane ó are a lot tougher to catch than others.
zigfried's avatar

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