Ads are gone. We're using Patreon to raise funds so we can grow. Please pledge support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All

Review Archives (Staff Reviews)

You are currently looking through staff reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
G.I. Joe: The Atlantis Factor (NES)

G.I. Joe: The Atlantis Factor review (NES)

Reviewed on April 18, 2013

Typically, video game sequels are able to build upon the experiences that their predecessors offered. I tend to enjoy any follow-ups far more than I do the initial installments for that reason, but it was clear to me as I played through G.I. Joe: The Atlantis Factor that something had gone very wrong in the design process. The result is a sequel that is inferior to the original title in nearly every way.
AlphaNerd's avatar
Cursed Loot (Xbox 360)

Cursed Loot review (X360)

Reviewed on April 16, 2013

Cheat to win! Or, at least, to shamelessly rehash for fame and profit.
EmP's avatar
Snow Bros. (NES)

Snow Bros. review (NES)

Reviewed on April 15, 2013

Snowmen are criminally underrepresented as video game protagonists.
Roto13's avatar
The Walking Dead: Survival Instinct (Xbox 360)

The Walking Dead: Survival Instinct review (X360)

Reviewed on April 15, 2013

The game spooked me on a couple of occasions and frequently almost has enough atmosphere to make its many shortcomings worth overlooking, but then you come across a walker staring at a wall, getting stuck to an object or running in circles due to pathfinding confusion and all immersion is shattered.
Suskie's avatar
Gremlins 2: The New Batch (NES)

Gremlins 2: The New Batch review (NES)

Reviewed on April 14, 2013

No one would blame you if you saw Gremlins 2: The New Batch sitting on a used game store shelf somewhere and quickly looked past it. There have been plenty of awful movie-based video games over the years, and the NES certainly wasn’t immune to this phenomenon. Look closer, though, and you’ll realize that this particular game was developed by Sunsoft, a company that produced some of the best software available for the original Nintendo console.
AlphaNerd's avatar
Ninja-Kun: Majou no Bouken (NES)

Ninja-Kun: Majou no Bouken review (NES)

Reviewed on April 13, 2013

If you like your ninja games slow and clunky and miserable, this is the game for you.
Roto13's avatar
Magi Nation (Game Boy Color)

Magi Nation review (GBC)

Reviewed on April 13, 2013

Magi-Nation is a fine example of western RPG developers floundering for success in the RPG genre in the early 21st century
space_dust's avatar
Dead Moon (TurboGrafx-16)

Dead Moon review (TG16)

Reviewed on April 13, 2013

In Dead Moon, only during boss fights, your ship turns around and faces left once you reach the screen’s right edge. You’ll feel like you're in an actual arena, struggling to survive a battle with a true rival. The game makes full use of this mechanic, too; bosses will fly all over the screen, forcing you to constantly remain on the move in order to stay alive.
overdrive's avatar
Secret of Evermore (SNES)

Secret of Evermore review (SNES)

Reviewed on April 09, 2013

A fresh team of developers from Squaresoft (the company’s North American wing) oversaw development with little direction from the head office. Apparently, their instructions were simply to craft a game about a boy and his dog traveling through a world comprised of cheesy movie environments. Given this simplistic premise and the relative inexperience of the developers, it’s not surprising that the product the team produced has so little in common with most other Square titles of the era.
Whelk's avatar
Abadox (NES)

Abadox review (NES)

Reviewed on April 09, 2013

When you resume play, you'll find yourself again controlling that same slow-moving, impotent piece of junk with which you started. The big difference is that now you'll possibly be starting from a mid-level checkpoint or even a more difficult late-game area. Odds are that you'll quickly lose the rest of your lives and realize that you're playing one of those shooters where, if you can't complete it on one life, you might as well reset and start again from scratch.
overdrive's avatar
Bokosuka Wars (NES)

Bokosuka Wars review (NES)

Reviewed on April 09, 2013

Everybody loses when they play Bokosuka Wars.
space_dust's avatar
Action 52 (NES)

Action 52 review (NES)

Reviewed on April 08, 2013

52 Ways to Die
JoeTheDestroyer's avatar
Pinball (NES)

Pinball review (NES)

Reviewed on April 08, 2013

Some games are timeless. Others are NES Pinball.
Roto13's avatar
Hyperdimension Neptunia Victory (PlayStation 3)

Hyperdimension Neptunia Victory review (PS3)

Reviewed on April 03, 2013

In this form, stats are increased substantially and so is the character’s bust line. Seriously. The young girls are transformed into scantily clad women who wear battle gear that is intended more for fashion than function. I'm not sure why Compile Heart decided to go in this direction, but it’s a franchise staple and it contributes to far too many excessively sexual scenes (including a group bath).
TylerTreese's avatar
White Noise Online (Xbox 360)

White Noise Online review (X360)

Reviewed on March 30, 2013

White Noise Online has made the original title, which I really enjoyed for the three months of its applicable life span, completely obsolete.
EmP's avatar
Battle Arena Toshinden (PlayStation)

Battle Arena Toshinden review (PSX)

Reviewed on March 29, 2013

Battle Arena Toshinden is a forgettable fighting game overshadowed by its brothers.
JoeTheDestroyer's avatar
BioShock Infinite (PC)

BioShock Infinite review (PC)

Reviewed on March 29, 2013

I'm used to BioShock games tucking their most important characters away in other rooms, so seeing Irrational put so much effort into someone who's at the very forefront from the get-go works wonders to make me feel more connected to the story's happenings. Booker may be the hero, and he's no slacker in the character development field himself, but Infinite is Elizabeth's show.
Suskie's avatar
Bubble Bobble Part 2 (NES)

Bubble Bobble Part 2 review (NES)

Reviewed on March 26, 2013

2 is the loneliest number.
Roto13's avatar
Quackshot Starring Donald Duck (Genesis)

Quackshot Starring Donald Duck review (GEN)

Reviewed on March 23, 2013

Although the various equipment available had the potential to facilitate a rousing adventure that could have offered a true sense of exploration, most stages are instead hampered by extremely linear design with little or nothing worthwhile to see that’s off the beaten path. Item swapping mostly just amounts to busy work, necessary though it is, and that process becomes less tolerable each time you’re forced to take another run through an area because you lost your last life and were returned to the world map.
honestgamer's avatar
Gears of War: Judgment (Xbox 360)

Gears of War: Judgment review (X360)

Reviewed on March 22, 2013

Judgment is uneventful. It is a succession of disconnected rooms in which unremarkable firefights take place. We rarely even see our team moving from one area to the next; when a mission ends, we push a button, look over our scorecard, push another button, sit through a load screen, and find ourselves in the next area.
Suskie's avatar

Additional Results (20 per page)

[001] [002] [003] [004] [005] [006] [007] [008] [009] [010] [011] [012] [013] [014] [015] [016] [017] [018] [019] [020] [021] [022] [023] [024] [025] [026] [027] [028] [029] [030] [031] [032] [033] [034] [035] [036] [037] [038] [039] [040] [041] [042] [043] [044] [045] [046] [047] [048] [049] [050] [051] [052] [053] [054] [055] [056] [057] [058] [059] [060] [061] [062] [063] [064] [065] [066] [067] [068] [069] [070] [071] [072] [073] [074] [075] [076] [077] [078] [079] [080] [081] [082] [083] [084] [085] [086] [087] [088] [089] [090] [091] [092] [093] [094] [095] [096] [097] [098] [099] [100] [101] [102] [103] [104] [105] [106] [107] [108] [109] [110] [111] [112] [113] [114] [115] [116] [117] [118] [119] [120] [121] [122] [123] [124] [125] [126] [127] [128] [129] [130] [131] [132] [133] [134] [135] [136] [137] [138] [139] [140] [141] [142] [143] [144] [145] [146] [147] [148] [149] [150] [151] [152] [153] [154] [155] [156] [157] [158] [159] [160] [161]

Info | Help | Privacy Policy | Contact | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party.Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors.