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Review Archives (Staff Reviews)

You are currently looking through staff reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Time Crisis II (PlayStation 2)

Time Crisis II review (PS2)

Reviewed on July 27, 2006

The clock is relentless, and the only way to beat it is to get through the walls of enemies as quickly as possible. Like cockroaches, terrorist thugs pour from doorways, pop out of windows, rappel from rooftops, and leap from trees, armed with everything from pistols, to machine guns, grenades, and tanks.
pup's avatar
Tony Hawk's Underground 2 (Xbox)

Tony Hawk's Underground 2 review (XBX)

Reviewed on July 27, 2006

Every now and then I forget this and foolishly revist the game, but in playing, I remember why I abandoned it. THUG2 is less about skating and more about a basic and ludicrous toilet humour that even rugby players wouldn't find amusing.
EmP's avatar
Jaws Unleashed (PlayStation 2)

Jaws Unleashed review (PS2)

Reviewed on July 21, 2006

But once you get past its beauty, once you stop admiring and start playing, the problems come. Jaws was a movie about a shark that ate people in the 70’s. Jaws: Unleashed is a game about a shark that eats people in the modern day, targets chemical plants, destroys oil platforms, and sinks ships by hurling torpedoes at them, making him the shark equivalent of Captain Planet.
lasthero's avatar
Arcus 1-2-3 (Sega CD)

Arcus 1-2-3 review (SCD)

Reviewed on July 21, 2006

Wolf Team often waxes philosophical in their games, and Arcus is no exception. This time around, they've crafted a story about the evils of war: Rig Veda doesn't like how humans indiscriminately slaughter their own kind, so he's going to kill EVERYONE. It's an unusually reflective journey that often seems more concerned with exploring the nature of humanity than with saving the world.
zigfried's avatar
Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse (NES)

Castlevania III: Dracula's Curse review (NES)

Reviewed on July 20, 2006

In Castlevania III, Death still is a brutal opponent (and making it a two-part battle doesn’t help), but a number of blocks are strategically placed in his room, so a skilled player can chase the reaper from one corner to the next. Trevor might have no safe places to hide, but neither does his undead foe! It might not seem like a big deal, but trust me — the odds are a lot more even here than in Castlevania.
overdrive's avatar
Arcus II: Silent Symphony (X68000)

Arcus II: Silent Symphony review (X68K)

Reviewed on July 20, 2006

Arcus II is clearly not like other RPGs. I've played some streamlined games that worked, such as Riviera, but this one is so minimal that it's pointless. By skipping cutscenes and using the "run and only kill bosses" method, it can be completed in about an hour. Yes, this is a roleplaying game that you can beat in ONE HOUR!
zigfried's avatar
Wild Arms 4 (PlayStation 2)

Wild Arms 4 review (PS2)

Reviewed on July 16, 2006

That might be the greatest thing about Wild Arms 4: Accessibility. The puzzles are tough enough, the battles take enough strategy and the plot has enough depth any deep-thinking gamer. But the frenzied gamer gets platforming action, a superior battle system and a story that never stops moving forward.
lasthero's avatar
Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES)

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link review (NES)

Reviewed on July 15, 2006

The reason Zelda II is special isn’t just the dungeons and their guardians, though, or the way it mixes two unique perspectives. What makes it so outstanding is how those elements contribute to the most tangible world the NES ever saw. It’s evident even in the way people talk about the game to this day.
honestgamer's avatar
Super C (NES)

Super C review (NES)

Reviewed on July 12, 2006

Winged soldiers come out of holes in the wall and glide to their level while mounted cannons provide a lethal distraction. And being distracted WILL lead to being dead on this level, as missing a jump and falling off the screen is as fatal as taking a round in the throat. As Scorpion and Mad Dog get closer to the top, an elevator catches up to them, forcing them to advance past these (and more) foes at a steady pace.
overdrive's avatar
Space Station: Silicon Valley (Nintendo 64)

Space Station: Silicon Valley review (N64)

Reviewed on July 12, 2006

Silicon Valley doesn’t offer action, intrigue, heavy violence, or anything remotely ‘hardcore’. But it does have sheep, floating sheep, sheep with springs for feet, dogs on wheels, rats on wheels, hippos with fecal mines, rabbits with helicopter ears that crap bombs from above, huskies on skis, penguins with infinite snowballs, turtle tanks, irritable sea bass, hyenas with motorcycle bodies, and about twenty others that escape me at the moment.
lasthero's avatar
Sexy Droids (Amiga)

Sexy Droids review (AMIGA)

Reviewed on July 11, 2006

This is a simple but engaging puzzle game for the whole family. Unless your family happens to be offended by nudity, because they’re the sort of puzzles where you gradually reveal pictures of women revealing themselves. Only instead of Penthouse Pets in the buff, you’ll be “treated” to chrome-plated gynoids posing provocatively in skimpy swimwear – and Robocop helmets.
sho's avatar
Point Blank DS (DS)

Point Blank DS review (DS)

Reviewed on July 10, 2006

A charming and frantic game, it’s all the fun of a carnival, without the hawkers, rigged games, and petting zoo aroma. Then again, there are reasons I don’t go to carnivals anymore.
pup's avatar
Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day (DS)

Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day review (DS)

Reviewed on July 09, 2006

Thankfully though, the smart folks at Nintendo have decided to put a patch on the problem, in the form of an intriguing little puzzle game. That game is Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day!
destinati0n's avatar
Micro Machines V4 (PC)

Micro Machines V4 review (PC)

Reviewed on July 08, 2006

What could have been a tightly controlling game, then, is just an exercise in frustration. You never dare approach a corner at full speed because if you do, you’re pretty much screwed. This is true of any of the hundreds and hundreds of vehicles you can add to your collection, making their inclusion cosmetic rather than useful.
honestgamer's avatar
Naruto: Ultimate Ninja (PlayStation 2)

Naruto: Ultimate Ninja review (PS2)

Reviewed on July 07, 2006

Taken as a pure brawler, Ultimate Ninja no doubt comes up wanting. There’s only one attack button. None of the fighters have that many attacks and combos, fifteen at the most. Every characters has specific moves, and some of the hidden characters have range and power advantages, but everyone does similar damage and moves alike; master one ninja and you’ve mastered them all. Topping that all off, everyone’s either extremely weak or extremely durable; it takes a ridiculous amount of time to win relying on straight-up fighting. All the more reason to not take this as a pure brawler.
lasthero's avatar
Task Force Harrier EX (Genesis)

Task Force Harrier EX review (GEN)

Reviewed on July 07, 2006

After completing the bland, but inoffensive, first stage, I noticed the second looked exactly the same. As did the third. And the fourth. Yep, this game possesses 13 stages and the first four were near-identical, with my plane flying over the Siberian tundra or some similarly frozen wasteland.
overdrive's avatar
The 7th Saga (SNES)

The 7th Saga review (SNES)

Reviewed on July 06, 2006

Enix went all-out to craft monsters that would test the mettle of even the most battle-tested adventurer. I faced instant-death attacks, brutal fireball and tornado spells and devastating melee attacks in fights with both bosses and run-of-the-mill overworld denizens. Just when I’d think a particularly tough battle was finally going in my favor, one foe would resurrect a fallen comrade or completely heal itself, forcing me to essentially start over.
overdrive's avatar
Marble Blast Ultra (Xbox 360)

Marble Blast Ultra review (X360)

Reviewed on July 05, 2006

As you race around the various stadiums trying to collect multi-colored gems ahead of your worthy opponents, you’ll find power-ups scattered all over the place. Some blow you up to giant size and let you send everyone who touches you flying. Others give you the ability to spring high into the air, or to rocket across most of the arena if you launch cleverly from the top of a ramp.
honestgamer's avatar
Castlevania Double Pack (Game Boy Advance)

Castlevania Double Pack review (GBA)

Reviewed on July 04, 2006

After playing the disappointing Castlevania Double Pack, the "Castlevania" name now brings back memories of emasculated bishounen dunderheads, forgettable filler music, long empty hallways, and tiresome backtracking. Quite frankly, this cartridge makes me sad.
zigfried's avatar
The King of Fighters EX: Neoblood (Game Boy Advance)

The King of Fighters EX: Neoblood review (GBA)

Reviewed on July 04, 2006

It confuses me as to how some of SNK’s most memorable characters, like Billy Kane and Duck King, get excluded, while the bland ones keep coming back.
pup's avatar

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