Ads are gone. We're using Patreon to raise funds so we can grow. Please pledge support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All

Review Archives (Reader Reviews)

You are currently looking through reader reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Tekken 5 (PlayStation 2)

Tekken 5 review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 11, 2005

Namco finally gets its act together in Tekken 5. Taking a back-to-basics approach, Namco has returned to the combat fundamentals of Tekken 3 in response to the mixed reactions towards Tekken 4. Experimenting with position changes, a narrative dialogue, and walled environments, Tekken 4 felt out of character. To offer some leniency, its failures were a necessary sidestep toward the development of Tekken 5, which rightfully removes the position changes, incorporates narrative dialogue, and deempha...
draqq_zyxx's avatar
SSX 3 (PlayStation 2)

SSX 3 review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 11, 2005

SSX 3 continues EA Sport's success with numerous improvements, increased customization, and an extensive and unified environment. Instead of a World Circuit where events are held at separate venues, SSX 3 takes place on a single mountain with three peaks of varying difficulty. Combine this with the funky fresh style distinctive of the SSX series and you have this third installment's underlying concept. Nevertheless, many of its new features are questionable and the quality and quantity of the up...
draqq_zyxx's avatar
Suikoden IV (PlayStation 2)

Suikoden IV review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 10, 2005

Following an unfortunate trend, Konami's fourth installment concentrates on improving its graphics and incorporating vocal dialogue in order to compete with the current trends in the RPG genre while not giving enough attention to gameplay. Somehow, something went horribly awry during the transition between Suikoden III and Suikoden IV. No one can explain why most of the game's problems could have been easily fixed simply by glancing at Suikoden III. Though maintaining Suikoden's standard for cre...
draqq_zyxx's avatar
Nintendogs (DS)

Nintendogs review (DS)

Reviewed on September 09, 2005

At first glance, Nintendogs looks to be a joke, a seemingly ridiculous game worthy of scorn. Upon experiencing its contents, however, people will be shocked, faces will turn, and a perpetual flow of comments about it being cute will overwhelm. Not to be mistaken for a traditional game, Nintendogs is like no other, a shining example of how Nintendo’s longing for innovation has truly paid off. Being in the form of a dog sim, this innovative title allows caring, petting, walking and playing with...
mrmiyamoto's avatar
Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War (PlayStation 2)

Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 09, 2005

Fifteen years ago, there was a war. Left with no other alternative, the Belkans detonated seven nuclear weapons on their own soil to halt the advances of the enemy. A world horrified by this turn of events sheathed its weapons, and uneasy peace settled over the land. However, as of late the neighboring country of Yuktobania has been taking an unusually hostile interest in your country of Osea, and the fires of war are beginning to flame up once again.
dragoon_of_infinity's avatar
Medal of Honor: Rising Sun (PlayStation 2)

Medal of Honor: Rising Sun review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 07, 2005

My best friend once told me the appeal of the Medal of Honor games was founded in their near-flawless ability to make the player feel they were part of a greater generation of humanity — people whose heroism and valor shaped the world we live in today.
overdrive's avatar
Beat Down: Fists of Vengeance (PlayStation 2)

Beat Down: Fists of Vengeance review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 07, 2005

Start with a free-roaming world like Grand Theft Auto 3. Add in all the greatness of the Streets of Rage and the Golden Axes and the Maximum Carnages. Mix the blazing gameplay that Capcom’s known for, the kind of intensity that’s introduced countless gamers to carpal-tunnel syndrome.
lasthero's avatar
Metal Slug 4 & 5 (Xbox)

Metal Slug 4 & 5 review (XBX)

Reviewed on September 05, 2005

Metal Slug 4 is HARD, therefore it deserves an introduction. For the last couple of years, I've heard a lot of negative things about this game, like how totally different it is from previous Slugs, or that it's too easy. Now that I've finally had the chance to play the title in this double pack, I'm stumped. It's not the plague that almost everyone seems to claim it is, and for the most part, it's basically on par with its predecessors.
pickhut's avatar
SVC Chaos: SNK vs. Capcom (Xbox)

SVC Chaos: SNK vs. Capcom review (XBX)

Reviewed on September 04, 2005

What SVC Chaos does is offer a few hours of fun for the hardcore fan. If you’ve never played any of Capcom’s better efforts then stop reading this review, go out to your nearest game store and pick up a copy of Capcom vs. SNK 2. If you’ve already played that awesome game and want to delve further into the series, then picking SVC Chaos may satisfy your cravings. However, if you wanted more grooves, a cool character ensemble and awesome bosses, then you will be sorely disappointed by Pl...
goldenvortex's avatar
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)

Super Mario Bros. 3 review (NES)

Reviewed on September 04, 2005

They say nothing in this world's perfect, and I suppose that's true. But there are some things out there that seem to be so flawless, so impressive, so ingenious down to the tiniest detail, that we can't help but declare them, if not perfect, then perfect enough. Take Super Mario Bros 3 for example. Not only was it light years ahead of anything that came before it, but it was light years ahead of everything that came afterwards as well. It seems like Nintendo took every detail that I think i...
mariner's avatar
Strikers 1945 Plus (Arcade)

Strikers 1945 Plus review (ARC)

Reviewed on September 03, 2005

Over the past few years there has been a void in my gamer soul where the shooters used to be. I felt destined to be counted among the lost; that vast pool of estranged old-schoolers, disenchanted by style-over-substance shooters, and forever reminiscing about Konami codes and R-Type machines at the mall. It seems my salvation has come, and it appeared as a simple airplane. No advanced spacecraft, heat-seeking lasers, or physics defying maneuvers. Just propellers and a machine gun.
pup's avatar
Gradius III (SNES)

Gradius III review (SNES)

Reviewed on September 03, 2005

An aspect commonly overlooked in classic gaming is how solitary the experience is. Like lonely teenagers in a basement, the heroes of Super Mario Brothers and Sonic the Hedgehog work in complete isolation. While they may be working to save the world, there is little representation of this in their respective games. Outside of fun, the only reward for playing is rescuing pixelated princesses and fuzzy animals. These games rely solely on the strength of their gameplay to attract ...
sgreenwell's avatar
Dangerous Seed (Genesis)

Dangerous Seed review (GEN)

Reviewed on September 03, 2005

I’m not amused.
overdrive's avatar
The Sims (PC)

The Sims review (PC)

Reviewed on September 03, 2005

I don’t get it. I don’t think I’ll ever get it. What the hell is so fun about watching someone else live their life? Why are we obsessed with reality shows like “Hogan Knows Best”, “Nick And Jessica” and “The Osbournes”? Have we suddenly become so desperate to leave our own lives that we will blindly follow someone else’s? I can’t answer that question, I really can’t. So if you sit there and ask me “Why is The Sims so popular” or “Why are there so many expansion packs and sequels to this game” I...
True's avatar
Viewpoint (Genesis)

Viewpoint review (GEN)

Reviewed on September 03, 2005

Since the Genesis is home to a bijillion shoot-em-ups, it really takes something interesting to make one of these titles stand out from the crowd; Divine Sealing has a "women feel pain when their clothes get removed" gimmick, Metallic Uniframe Super Hybrid Armor has whatever the hell that game was known for, and in this case, Viewpoint has a unique perspective. Unfortunately, this game's selling point ends up screwing with the gameplay, making a rather average shoot-em-up pr...
pickhut's avatar
Whip Rush 2222 AD (Genesis)

Whip Rush 2222 AD review (GEN)

Reviewed on September 01, 2005

If you want to give Renovation credit for one thing when they released Whip Rush 2222 A.D. for the Genesis in 1990, praise them for knowing how to copy from good games.
overdrive's avatar
The Incredible Hulk: Ultimate Destruction (GameCube)

The Incredible Hulk: Ultimate Destruction review (GCN)

Reviewed on September 01, 2005

He is the most physically powerful being ever imagined, the living embodiment of mortal strength. Not faster than a speeding bullet, but far more powerful than a locomotive, and capable of leaping miles in a single bound. His enemies are legion; as strong as they are numerous, infinitely persistent. But never enough. Before him, people flee. Behind him, cities crumble. Not a villain, not a hero, not anything in between. He is a force of nature given flesh. Random. Fierce. Unstoppable. Irresistib...
lasthero's avatar
Axelay (SNES)

Axelay review (SNES)

Reviewed on August 31, 2005

When it comes to this genre, I can safely say that I am no expert. Taking advice from veterans and shooter connoisseurs and after being chronically depressed by the marathon levels in Space Megaforce, I came across Laxe.
goldenvortex's avatar
Secret Scout in the Temple of Demise (NES)

Secret Scout in the Temple of Demise review (NES)

Reviewed on August 26, 2005

You find yourself in a dense jungle, just one pudgy little boy scout all alone. Walking along, you see a lone savage, crouching atop a temple. He lunges at you, knife in hand. Your only hope is to stave him off with your kung fu knowledge, kicking him mercilessly until he falls. But beware, as some, um, things are flying at you as well. I think they're traffic cones. Skillfully weave your way through these hazardous safety cones and destroy the vile savage. Free to move onward, you find a...
mariner's avatar
Dash Galaxy in the Alien Asylum (NES)

Dash Galaxy in the Alien Asylum review (NES)

Reviewed on August 26, 2005

I laughed when I first saw the box art to this game. Hopefully most of you know of Flash Gordon, the old pulp sc-fi hero who fought Ming the Merciless and the subject of a 1980 movie. This movie is, objectively, rather poor, but is still incredibly fun to watch. You can't help but smile at the horrid lines ("What do you mean, 'Flash Gordon approaching?'"), the hammed up acting, the blatant 1950s look, the brilliant cheesy yet heart pounding theme song, and the goofy plot. Well, it's obvious ...
mariner's avatar

Additional Results (20 per page)

[001] [002] [003] [004] [005] [006] [007] [008] [009] [010] [011] [012] [013] [014] [015] [016] [017] [018] [019] [020] [021] [022] [023] [024] [025] [026] [027] [028] [029] [030] [031] [032] [033] [034] [035] [036] [037] [038] [039] [040] [041] [042] [043] [044] [045] [046] [047] [048] [049] [050] [051] [052] [053] [054] [055] [056] [057] [058] [059] [060] [061] [062] [063] [064] [065] [066] [067] [068] [069] [070] [071] [072] [073] [074] [075] [076] [077] [078] [079] [080] [081] [082] [083] [084] [085] [086] [087] [088] [089] [090] [091] [092] [093] [094] [095] [096] [097] [098] [099] [100] [101] [102] [103] [104] [105] [106] [107] [108] [109] [110] [111] [112] [113] [114] [115] [116] [117] [118] [119] [120] [121] [122] [123] [124] [125] [126] [127] [128] [129] [130] [131] [132] [133] [134] [135] [136] [137] [138] [139] [140] [141] [142] [143] [144] [145] [146] [147] [148] [149] [150] [151] [152] [153] [154] [155] [156] [157] [158] [159] [160] [161] [162] [163] [164] [165] [166] [167] [168] [169] [170] [171] [172] [173] [174] [175] [176] [177] [178] [179] [180] [181] [182] [183] [184] [185] [186] [187] [188] [189] [190] [191] [192] [193] [194] [195] [196] [197] [198] [199] [200] [201] [202] [203] [204] [205] [206] [207] [208] [209] [210] [211] [212] [213] [214] [215] [216] [217] [218] [219] [220] [221] [222] [223] [224] [225] [226] [227] [228] [229] [230] [231] [232] [233] [234] [235] [236] [237] [238] [239] [240] [241] [242] [243] [244] [245] [246] [247] [248] [249] [250] [251] [252] [253] [254] [255] [256] [257] [258] [259] [260] [261] [262]

Info | Help | Privacy Policy | Contact | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party.Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.