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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by overdrive and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Strike Gunner: S.T.G. (SNES)

Strike Gunner: S.T.G. review (SNES)

Reviewed on June 26, 2008

The only question is: would a player want to go back through this one to tinker with the difficulty and experiment with each weapon in different levels to find the perfect combination? I didn't. While I really liked some of the concepts present in Strike Gunner, I found myself wishing they'd been placed in a better game.
Medal of Honor: Vanguard (PlayStation 2)

Medal of Honor: Vanguard review (PS2)

Reviewed on June 11, 2008

Now, instead of using canteens and first aid kits to restore health, all you have to do is duck out of the fray for a bit. Keegan can completely regenerate his health in a matter of seconds if he is able to avoid getting shot. To make this easier than you might expect, a good number of Nazis seem content to stay in one place and wait for you to enter their shooting range, as opposed to pursuing you in order to deal that killing blow.
The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons (Game Boy Color)

The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons review (GBC)

Reviewed on June 09, 2008

Take Dodongo, for example. To defeat this chap, you first have to use the tried and true strategy of feeding him bombs. Then, after he's stunned by the explosion, using the power bracelet, you must pick him up and toss him onto a bed of spikes before he regains his equilibrium.
Resident Evil 4 (PlayStation 2)

Resident Evil 4 review (PS2)

Reviewed on May 29, 2008

Those early-game villagers utilize all sorts of farming implements, such as pitchforks, sickles and hatchets, in their attempts to end Leon's mission prematurely. And they're the patsies. Just wait until one of their heads explodes to release a tentacle-flailing parasite seemingly crafted in the darkest recesses of H.P. Lovecraft's imagination. Or a gigantic ogre lumbers into the fray, rips a gnarled tree out of the ground and starts swinging it around like it was light as a feather. Or a monstrous semi-invisible bug pounces, spraying Leon with acidic secretions.
Stinger (NES)

Stinger review (NES)

Reviewed on April 25, 2008

Part of the problem is that all three horizontal stages feel the exact same, as do the four vertical ones — with the only noticeable differences being the background graphics and the ferocity of the enemy waves. Each level, regardless of viewpoint, has the TwinBee ship moving on a slowly-scrolling screen while one wave after another of flying foes come after it.
Obscure: The Aftermath (PlayStation 2)

Obscure: The Aftermath review (PS2)

Reviewed on April 23, 2008

All the kids are planning to hit up some exclusive frat party, but first — it's time to partake of the new awesome college party drug. Some mysterious new flower's pollen, if inhaled, bestows a really good buzz and some wacky hallucinations. In fact, they're so wacky that Corey and Mei find themselves in a creeped-out locale ripped right out of any number of hellish Silent Hill locations. After enduring a few experiences nightmarish enough to convince just about anyone besides me that drugs are bad, Corey wakes up a bathroom with the hangover to end all hangovers.
Tag Team Wrestling (NES)

Tag Team Wrestling review (NES)

Reviewed on April 04, 2008

You don’t have complex button combos to press in order to do moves in Tag Team Wrestling — instead, you have a menu. Yes, a menu. All you do is get close to an opponent and push a button to “lock up” with him. Then, you have a couple seconds to tap the other button to scroll through a list of moves and select one. Then, you get to sit back and watch your dude execute that move before preparing to do the whole thing again and again and again.
Burai Fighter (NES)

Burai Fighter review (NES)

Reviewed on February 22, 2008

From there, despite graphical differences, the second, fourth, fifth and seventh stages are essentially the same. You go one way while blasting stuff, change direction while killing more things, change direction again and so on until you get to the boss. While it’s a nice formula that does have its moments, such as in the fifth level where you seemingly spend an eternity in the first corridor scrolling every which way before moving on, things tend to feel like you're?doing the same thing over and over again.
Kirby's Dream Land (Game Boy)

Kirby's Dream Land review (GB)

Reviewed on February 21, 2008

Without his ability-stealing powers, Kirby’s a pretty dull hero. He can gulp down some air and fly, he can spit that air at enemies and he can swallow them and their projectiles to either shoot at other foes or eat. And that’s all. He won’t pick up a sword or hammer. He can’t emit an freezing barrier to turn foes into blocks of ice. He’ll never transform into a fast-moving, laser-shooting UFO. Kirby might not simultaneously suck and blow, but those are about the only things he is capable of doing.
Tales of Legendia (PlayStation 2)

Tales of Legendia review (PS2)

Reviewed on January 31, 2008

Now, if I wanted to use a bit of tactics, I’d hit the O along with the directional pad to use one of Senel’s special attacks. And if I REALLY wanted to go overboard, I’d program a magic-user’s healing spell to either the L2 or R2 button and personally dictate when they regenerated everyone’s life. And if forcing one character to CONSTANTLY cure everyone didn’t make even the toughest boss fights pathetically easy, well, there’s Climax Mode.
Flying Hero: Bugyuru no Daibouken (SNES)

Flying Hero: Bugyuru no Daibouken review (SNES)

Reviewed on January 23, 2008

The graphics were bright and colorful and it was pretty entertaining to see Sofel’s take on certain staple elements of shooters — such as the 1943-ish gunship in the game’s third level which leads to a boss fight when the final two crew members leap off the crippled boat and merge into a gigantic pirate bird.
Wally Bear and the No Gang (NES)

Wally Bear and the No Gang review (NES)

Reviewed on December 30, 2007

The first few levels are pitifully easy and repetitive as hell. Then, towards the end, the difficulty level reaches the WTF?!? phase that horrid NES games seemingly took pride in achieving as Wally, who isn't the easiest guy to control in mid-air, is stuck doing a number of precise jumps with death being the price of failure. And all he's trying to do is get to his uncle's house for a party. Maybe Wally should scrap his morality lessons and hang out with Ricky Rat — all he has to do is jump some dogs and dodge some birds to visit him!
Lufia: The Ruins of Lore (Game Boy Advance)

Lufia: The Ruins of Lore review (GBA)

Reviewed on December 21, 2007

So, what you’ll be doing in virtually every dungeon is constantly switching between characters to have them break what needs to be broken and then flipping a switch or pressing a button to get to the next room. Great “puzzles”, guys! With the lack of brain power needed to accomplish this, it really makes you notice certain things about the dungeons — like how they’re really long and dull.
Tenchi o Kurau II: Shokatsu Koumei Den (NES)

Tenchi o Kurau II: Shokatsu Koumei Den review (NES)

Reviewed on December 20, 2007

It’s not that it’s a bad game by any means — it just doesn’t offer anything important that already wasn’t in the original Destiny of an Emperor. In fact, this game essentially takes the majority of the first one and adds a lot of story-telling to what is essentially a Dragon Warrior clone set in feudal China.
Wizardry: Proving Grounds of the Mad Overlord (NES)

Wizardry: Proving Grounds of the Mad Overlord review (NES)

Reviewed on November 30, 2007

You’ll open the battle against a shadowy figure with an vague name like “unseen entity” and have to wait a turn or two before the foe’s real name is revealed. And that can be dangerous, as this “unseen entity” could be a Murphy’s Ghost, which primarily exists to give young parties a high-experience foe weak enough for them to beat without much risk OR it could be any of many undesirable level-draining undead.
Duke Nukem 3D (PC)

Duke Nukem 3D review (PC)

Reviewed on November 02, 2007

In the first two levels of this game’s first scenario, Duke takes refuge from the alien-infested streets in such wholesome places as an adult movie theater and strip club — where he can get tit shows from the pole dancers while making leering comments that make me think “drunken, seedy uncle” more than “savior of Earth”. God, Duke’s great!
Deadly Towers (NES)

Deadly Towers review (NES)

Reviewed on October 18, 2007

It just isn’t fun to take novice hero Prince Meyer through corridors littered with non-threatening bouncing slime-like things — only to unexpectedly get whisked away to a maze loaded with animal-headed humanoids capable of disemboweling him with one hit. It’s really not fun to have to run aimlessly through these places in hopes that you’ll get lucky and find the exit before something kills Meyer. And it’s REALLY REALLY not fun to actually escape one of these places, only to blunder into another 15 seconds later.
Might & Magic III: Isles of Terra (PC)

Might & Magic III: Isles of Terra review (PC)

Reviewed on October 11, 2007

And those limitations make themselves known as soon as the game begins. Among the initial tasks set before players is one involving destroying the swarm of rats that’ve taken over Fountain Head, the town where the game starts. Attempting to do this immediately will likely lead to a quick demise, though, as those rats are a bit too fierce for a beginning party. Heck, even exploring the back alley’s of Fountain Head’s not advisable as there are a few slime-like critters capable of giving a group of novices a tougher fight that they might anticipate.
Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas (PlayStation 2)

Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 14, 2007

Simply put, this game is HUGE — so large that a representation of one of America’s largest cities only takes up one corner of its world. Also in the game are San Fierro (San Francisco), Las Venturas (Las Vegas) and miles upon miles of the surrounding countryside, which is loaded with farms, villages, mountains and even a top-secret military base. And very little space is wasted. During the course of play, Carl will find himself doing either mandatory or optional missions that force him to cover virtually every square inch of this vast realm.
Final Fantasy Legend (Game Boy)

Final Fantasy Legend review (GB)

Reviewed on September 07, 2007

For example, in the very first world, all a player has to do is go to three castles and get a specific item from each king to open the next few floors of the tower for exploration. One king gladly does so if the party kills a local bandit living in a tiny cave. Another fights the party for his treasure in what could be considered a mini-boss fight. The third is assassinated, leaving the party to slaughter the weak usurper and claim the third item. All of this could be done in 15 minutes — if I hadn’t had to spend a good hour or so fighting monsters to earn money for equipment and to build up my humans.

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