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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by overdrive and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
The Great Waldo Search (NES)

The Great Waldo Search review (NES)

Reviewed on April 10, 2009

I understand the NES wasn't the most powerful system out there, but only five puzzles? Give me a break! A game of The Great Waldo Search is destined to end in mere minutes because there's so little to do. And after that? Well, you could play again on the exact same screens looking for the exact same things in different locations. Perhaps you could try the "expert" difficulty where the only noticeable different is that you can't collect clocks to give yourself more time on ANY of the puzzles. Or you can follow my lead and vow NEVER to play this horrible excuse for entertainment again.
Blue Dragon (Xbox 360)

Blue Dragon review (X360)

Reviewed on March 27, 2009

Just by going through the game and experimenting with the class system enough to give all five of my characters (Shu and pals find two more allies before the end of the first disc) a decent amount of versatility, I was trouncing every storyline encounter in my path to the point where the game's final bosses wound up being exercises in me tapping buttons while being more interested in the college basketball game I was watching on my other television.
Legend of the Ghost Lion (NES)

Legend of the Ghost Lion review (NES)

Reviewed on March 18, 2009

Bread is the ONLY way to heal Maria, so you'll always want a good supply of it on hand. In fact, the entire game revolves around how much bread you possess, as your goal at any given time will be to run to a dungeon, find all the treasure and get out as quickly as possible. If you have enough bread, that will be easy. If not, you'll be at the mercy of the game's lackluster combat engine.
Leather Goddesses of Phobos (Apple II)

Leather Goddesses of Phobos review (APP2)

Reviewed on February 25, 2009

While "Tame" doesn't allow even remotely suggestive language, in "Lewd", anything goes. Sexual encounters are spelled out and dirty language is recognized by the computer. Obviously, that was the only mode I ever played, although, upon further review, the sex scenes aren't any more titillating than those in the average romance novel read by bored housewives looking for any sort of release from day-to-day life with their unemployed husband who just drank himself to sleep in front of the television yet again.
Castlequest (NES)

Castlequest review (NES)

Reviewed on February 13, 2009

My hero began the game with a whopping 50 lives and there are TONS of vials scattered through the castle worth one bonus life each. However, each life is naught but a fleeting moment in Castlequest's.....uhhh...castle. I found that out in the very first room. I grabbed the blue key right next to me, used it to open the nearby blue door (keys only open doors of their color) and jumped to a ledge right above me. There was an enemy here, so I prepared to stab him with my really tiny sword. Before I could get close enough to complete this task, he fired an arrow at me and I died.
Low G Man (NES)

Low G Man review (NES)

Reviewed on February 06, 2009

One minute, you'll be fighting robotic enemies; the next, it'll be little flying gargoyles coming at you. You'll find yourself diving to the depths of an ocean to set up a jaunt through an alien-infested submarine in the second level; meanwhile the fourth level begins with a jaunt up a tower leading to a fight with a teleporting boss in an oddly psychedelic room and ends with a short trip through an alien mothership.
Emerald Dragon (SNES)

Emerald Dragon review (SNES)

Reviewed on January 30, 2009

Unfortunately for Atrushan, there is a bit of a curse on the land, making it very deadly for dragons to venture there (the reason they're confined to their own isolated realm). However, it doesn't take him long (a tiny tutorial dungeon) to gain a relic that transforms him into a human, allowing him to seek out Tamryn and teach the game's assorted bad guys that when a dragon's pledged to protect a girl, it doesn't pay to be attempting a hostile takeover of the land she's calling home.
Panic Restaurant (NES)

Panic Restaurant review (NES)

Reviewed on January 21, 2009

You control an elderly chef who finds that a villainous counterpart named OHDOVE has just taken over his restaurant AND somehow made all the food homicidal. Personally, I'm a bit skeptical as to how food that attacks people is going to help this place keep customers happy, but unlike OHDOVE, I've never presumed to be a qualified restaurant owner.
Kung Fu Panda (Xbox 360)

Kung Fu Panda review (X360)

Reviewed on January 14, 2009

As one of those older gamers, the main thing I enjoyed about this game was its level design. While the stages were all fairly short and very linear, there was a lot of variety. In one level, I was scaling a mountain while not only fighting off constant attacks by a gang of gorillas, but also dodging a non-stop barrage of rocks being flung towards me by their commander. A little bit later, I found myself having to prevent hordes of wolves from destroying all the relics in the abode of the Furious Five.
Meteos Wars (Xbox 360)

Meteos Wars review (X360)

Reviewed on January 08, 2009

When I first started playing this game, I felt like I was being dropped into the fastest level of Tetris with no warning. While I now feel I've gotten the hang of things, it still moves fast enough to demand all my concentration in order to top my computer opponent. While each contest only lasts three minutes, that time seems an eternity as I frantically try to keep from being overwhelmed by the blocks quickly filling my side of the screen, while attempting to craft large enough combos to put the computer in a world of hurt.
Final Fight Guy (SNES)

Final Fight Guy review (SNES)

Reviewed on January 07, 2009

What the player actually gets is the exact same game as the original SNES version with one difference — Cody is gone and replaced with Guy. Yep, that’s it. The fourth level doesn't find its way back into the game and there still is no two-player mode. But, uh, you do get to play with Guy and that has to amount to something, right?
Rogue Galaxy (PlayStation 2)

Rogue Galaxy review (PS2)

Reviewed on December 30, 2008

It also doesn't help that the two companions you can have at your side at any time are idiots. I didn't notice those guys going for charge attacks when necessary, leaving me to do that myself while they ineffectively flailed at the monsters. They also didn't seem all that keen on blocking attacks or any sort of evasive action. Instead, they'd occasionally request to use a healing item or ability when they felt that'd be a good change of pace from blindly running at monsters and attacking with all the grace and style of a drunken berserker.
Daikatana (Game Boy Color)

Daikatana review (GBC)

Reviewed on December 24, 2008

Due to fancy time/space manipulation, Hiro has his own Daikatana, but his version of the sword has no magic power. Fortunately, for a villain, Kage is remarkably helpful and repeatedly decides to assert his power over your group by teleporting them to various time periods — where Hiro can get his sword powered up by helping the right folk. Why doesn't Kage just use his power to kill Hiro and end his pitiful rebellion? Well, due to the laws of physics or some other hogwash, if two versions of the Daikatana collide, everything goes boom due to creating a paradox or whatever.
The Castlevania Adventure (Game Boy)

The Castlevania Adventure review (GB)

Reviewed on December 11, 2008

Virtually all of this level is you in a race against time while spikes descend upon you, chase you as you ascend a tower and follow after you while you sprint to the left. You'll be jumping across plummeting platforms and narrow blocks like crazy, whipping worms who stand in your path and doing whatever you can to stay ahead of the pursuing spikes. With a character that neither jumps nor moves well. After getting through all that, I was so mentally drained I wasn't even bothered by how pitifully weak the humanoid bat creature boss wound up being.
Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance (Game Boy Advance)

Castlevania: Harmony of Dissonance review (GBA)

Reviewed on December 04, 2008

Adding to the intrigue, a couple of meetings with Dracula's top subordinate, Death, seem to show that the grim reaper seems more than a bit confused as to what's going on and why his master's castle even returned. Fortunately for Juste, the instant Death figures everything out, he tells the Belmont everything in a fit of excessive gloating, which eventually leads to the endgame and (if you meet certain stipulations) happy ending. And Dracula keeps this guy on staff for what reason?
NCAA Football 06 (PlayStation 2)

NCAA Football 06 review (PS2)

Reviewed on December 01, 2008

And then the hedonistic binge called recruiting begins. You'll be confronted by a map of the United States. Clicking on any state will give you the list of all the potential recruits residing there. Or, to simply things, you can go to a menu to give you more focused lists such as those kids ranked in the nation's elite players, those from your school's state or those who initially have some degree of interest in you.
Mouse Trap (Atari 2600)

Mouse Trap review (A2600)

Reviewed on November 26, 2008

I'm not sure why the mouse looks so happy, all things considered, as a number of (possibly starving) felines patrol the corridors of the maze. Working in the mouse's favor were a few dog biscuits, which would turn it into a dog that could rip through the cats like me through a Thanksgiving turkey drumstick, sending them back to their cages ďż˝ much like Pac-Man could do to ghosts.
Ultima: Quest of the Avatar (NES)

Ultima: Quest of the Avatar review (NES)

Reviewed on November 13, 2008

And so your quest isn't to overpower some great evil, but instead to master eight virtues and become an Avatar — the human representation of goodness whose purity of soul will be the necessary inspiration for the populace to enter a new era of prosperity.
Xenogears (PlayStation)

Xenogears review (PSX)

Reviewed on November 11, 2008

And there were plenty of moments like that throughout the game that kept me wanting to keep playing so the countless number of questions I had could be answered. Why did imperial commander Ramsus have a serious grudge against Fei, considering that Fei seemingly has no clue as to who the man is? Why does Citan (the doctor you visit in the game's beginning) seem to know so much about virtually everything? What is the connection between Fei and the ominously threatening Grahf, who constantly preaches the joys of utter destruction?
Airlock (Atari 2600)

Airlock review (A2600)

Reviewed on October 21, 2008

Well, actually, the play control's probably the real obstacle. Let's face it, with good control, this game would be nearly as easy as playing Sneak 'n Peek against yourself. Here, you're controlling a character that has barely enough jumping ability to clear one of those coffins and mistiming your jump even by the slightest of margins will cause you to recoil back behind it.

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