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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
The Legend of Zelda (NES)

The Legend of Zelda review (NES)

Reviewed on January 31, 2005

Link moves with the elfish grace you might expect from his size. A quick thrust of the sword is enough to vanquish most foes, and when it’s not a secondary slash will do (at least, throughout most of the game). All he has to fear is the stream of fireballs Hyrule’s mermaid-like monsters launch from various rivers and lakes, as only a magical shield can deflect such attacks. Later, there are some projectiles even that armament won’t defend against.
Snake Rattle 'N Roll (NES)

Snake Rattle 'N Roll review (NES)

Reviewed on January 31, 2005

To reach the archway you see at the very top, you must zig-zag your way along a series of jumps. You leap forward, grinning because you know you can’t possibly miss the landing. And then you do. And again, and again. Many of these jumps aren’t straight, either. Some require you to wrap your way around a cliff mid-air. The problem is, it’s often hard to tell which move is required.
T&C 2: Thrilla's Surfari (NES)

T&C 2: Thrilla's Surfari review (NES)

Reviewed on January 26, 2005

If the first few stages are frantic, the ones that follow are downright overwhelming. Soon you’ll find yourself weaving down a raging river as hippo heads and rocks threaten to knock you into the soup. Soon you’ll find yourself careening wildly through a desert, dodging scorpion venom and snakes and rocks that all conspire to knock you into pits. And those are just the easy parts.
Tiny Toon Adventures 2: Trouble in Wackyland (NES)

Tiny Toon Adventures 2: Trouble in Wackyland review (NES)

Reviewed on January 26, 2005

In the sequel, it seems a secret admirer has invited you to visit him at the fun house in an amusement park. Before you can get in, though, you must collect tickets from rides. You gain these only by successfully completing the rides. Things still don’t seem so bad. Then you try the different attractions and you realize something awful: they all suck.
The Flintstones: The Rescue of Dino & Hoppy (NES)

The Flintstones: The Rescue of Dino & Hoppy review (NES)

Reviewed on January 26, 2005

Fortunately, there are plenty of reasons to keep trying, even when you find yourself dying more than you might like. For one, the levels themselves are quite pretty. Sure, they don’t boast a lot of polygons or even colors, but the artists rendered them in a quaint style that can cheer you as you travel through them. Dense jungles somehow seem cheerful thanks to vibrant colors. An undersea level oozes charm, as does a distant island resort you’ll visit late in the game.
Paperboy (NES)

Paperboy review (NES)

Reviewed on January 24, 2005

Of course, there are threats to your little newspaper empire. That cute little dog you see cowering in his home on the front lawn may very well bite you in the butt if you don’t toss a paper at just the right moment. And there are rumors that the Grim Reaper himself frequents the neighborhood from time to time. Add runaway lawnmowers, tires, go carts and disillusioned customers of times past and you have the formula for a rather dangerous job.
Captain Skyhawk (NES)

Captain Skyhawk review (NES)

Reviewed on January 24, 2005

To play the game well, you’ll have to adapt to the rapidly-changing environment. Glide left past one hill, then quickly rebound to the right as an imposing rock wall threatens to turn your aircraft into a charred stain. The whole time, you’ll have to keep an eye on the surface. Alien vehicles fire shots from the ground, star-shaped projectiles that will cause you to burst into flames if you should happen to collide with them.
Mega Man X8 (PlayStation 2)

Mega Man X8 review (PS2)

Reviewed on January 22, 2005

You see, not every stage takes place with you watching from the sidelines. Sometimes, you’ll get an over-the-shoulder perspective. However, this is perfectly acceptable for two reasons. Firstly, only two areas make this deviation. And secondly, those stages are actually quite enjoyable!
Time Lord (NES)

Time Lord review (NES)

Reviewed on January 17, 2005

Suppose that you play through the Castle Marman level one time. You find one orb after picking mushrooms, one hanging on a tower high above a wide space, and a flying monkey (dragon?) drops another. Then there’s the one you randomly find when you jump down a set of stone columns. The last thing you really want to do the next time you play through is guess the location of that fourth orb. It’s just… not fun.
Dragon Warrior (NES)

Dragon Warrior review (NES)

Reviewed on January 08, 2005

Step outside the castle and you might make it fifteen or twenty steps. Or you might make it one step. Or two, or three. Suddenly, that village a half-screen away can seem almost out of reach. This is compounded by another problem: the hero is a wimp for the majority of the game.
Tetrisphere (Nintendo 64)

Tetrisphere review (N64)

Reviewed on January 01, 2005

Picture a spinning orb floating in space. It’s comprised of a bunch of tetrad blocks, meshed together flawlessly to form a prison of sorts. Inside this fragile abode, a robot anxiously darts about like a firefly caught in a bottle, trying to escape. Your job in Tetrisphere is to make it possible for your imprisoned friend to do so.
Wild Arms 3 (PlayStation 2)

Wild Arms 3 review (PS2)

Reviewed on December 16, 2004

You see, the world of Filgaia is the sort where skeletons lay bleached under relentless sunlight and like it because at least the demons are distracted by human flesh. Your human flesh to be specific, unless you pay attention.
Mario Party 6 (GameCube)

Mario Party 6 review (GCN)

Reviewed on December 15, 2004

What’s important to note here is that the microphone accomplishes nothing a standard controller doesn’t. It would be just as simple to press a button corresponding to the fruit type, after all. And in some cases, it would work more smoothly. To continue with the example I gave above, suppose the player with the microphone wants to cheat.
Wizards & Warriors 3 (NES)

Wizards & Warriors 3 review (NES)

Reviewed on November 30, 2004

The problem comes from the nature of your terrible hops. Kuros can change direction in air, but I found myself gritting my teeth every time I left the ground, hoping he would do as I told him. He’s quite slow to respond. And since you have to make some rather long, precise jumps throughout your adventure, this is a pretty big problem. If you make an especially long jump and don’t release the ‘A’ button just before you land, you’ll even launch immediately into another (perhaps fatal) hop.
Castle Shikigami 2 (PlayStation 2)

Castle Shikigami 2 review (PS2)

Reviewed on November 24, 2004

It takes only a few seconds to power up, and then you can release much greater devastation. Some enemies won’t even fall unless you know how to take advantage of the technique. Best of all, you get point multipliers through constructive use of your magical arsenal. There’s little more satisfying than nearly ramming a machine just as it bursts into flames, then noticing the ‘x8’ multiplier flashing on the screen.
Feel the Magic: XY/XX (DS)

Feel the Magic: XY/XX review (DS)

Reviewed on November 21, 2004

The thing is, you're just rubbing the screen with your stylus to push up said fish. Do well enough and you're onto the next area. A few mini-games later, you're back to rubbing the screen with your stylus. Presentation has changed, but your encouraged activity has not. Whether you're moving tacks to the side or pushing goldfish out of a man's throat or even digging through sand to find a purse's lost content, it does get old.
Shin Megami Tensei: Nocturne (PlayStation 2)

Shin Megami Tensei: Nocturne review (PS2)

Reviewed on November 17, 2004

A once-verdant landscape is no more than a barren desert. And thus the scene is set. The plot twists its way through more than 80 hours of gameplay from that point, never overbearing but always gnawing at your consciousness from behind the scenes. As interesting as the sequence of events that gradually unfolds is, though, this game isn’t about plot. It’s about old-school, ‘punch you in the face and laugh when you cry’ role-playing.
Metal Slug 3 (Xbox)

Metal Slug 3 review (XBX)

Reviewed on October 28, 2004

Press toward the right, mashing the button furiously as livid crustaceans emerge from ramshackle shanties. If they get too close, swipe your knife across them and return to your main quest: survival. Buildings explode into flame and melt away as if they never existed. Prisoners of war thank you heartily as you cut loose their ropes on the way to shoot a bubble-blowing goon ahead. But wait, there’s a weapon pick-up!
Tony Hawk's Underground 2 (GameCube)

Tony Hawk's Underground 2 review (GCN)

Reviewed on October 13, 2004

From there, the game forces you to watch inane cinemas between events. The scenes here are downright childish. At the best of moments, they might make you smile. But they’re poking fun at just about everyone not in the game, and their juvenile nature is more often irritating than it is amusing. That, or they’re ripped from every comedy movie you’ve ever seen and are no longer amusing as a result. No matter how you’ve performed, the plot is scripted and tries to paint you as the underdog.
Attack of the Killer Tomatoes (NES)

Attack of the Killer Tomatoes review (NES)

Reviewed on October 08, 2004

Considering its length, Attack of the Killer Tomatoes packs a surprising number of mind benders into the mix. There are the organ-playing Ketchuk, the maze-like corridors that immediately precede him, the reversed gravity in the third stage, and other threats too horrifying to describe. It feels like half the areas you experience have some little quirk to them.

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