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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Galaga (Xbox 360)

Galaga review (X360)

Reviewed on August 05, 2006

So it is that we come to a new question: though Galaga has ‘worked’ for many years, how does it fare on the Xbox 360? The answer is that it does quite well for itself, if you’re not expecting anything more than what the game has always been.
Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES)

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link review (NES)

Reviewed on July 15, 2006

The reason Zelda II is special isn’t just the dungeons and their guardians, though, or the way it mixes two unique perspectives. What makes it so outstanding is how those elements contribute to the most tangible world the NES ever saw. It’s evident even in the way people talk about the game to this day.
Micro Machines V4 (PC)

Micro Machines V4 review (PC)

Reviewed on July 08, 2006

What could have been a tightly controlling game, then, is just an exercise in frustration. You never dare approach a corner at full speed because if you do, you’re pretty much screwed. This is true of any of the hundreds and hundreds of vehicles you can add to your collection, making their inclusion cosmetic rather than useful.
Marble Blast Ultra (Xbox 360)

Marble Blast Ultra review (X360)

Reviewed on July 05, 2006

As you race around the various stadiums trying to collect multi-colored gems ahead of your worthy opponents, you’ll find power-ups scattered all over the place. Some blow you up to giant size and let you send everyone who touches you flying. Others give you the ability to spring high into the air, or to rocket across most of the arena if you launch cleverly from the top of a ramp.
Feeding Frenzy (Xbox 360)

Feeding Frenzy review (X360)

Reviewed on June 25, 2006

Fish you couldn’t eat moments before suddenly become your victims, sort of like how the sticky ball you rolled around in Katamari Damacy couldn’t pick up a mouse one minute, but later rolled up an entire skyscraper on a single pass. Of course, there are a few key differences.
Gradius Collection (PSP)

Gradius Collection review (PSP)

Reviewed on June 14, 2006

When the ship begins, it fires small pellets in a straight path. These are soon supplemented with peripheral shots, lasers and shields that give you a better chance against whatever the alien empire you’re battling happens to throw your way. Soon, your painfully slow ship will move more efficiently—this finally gives you a chance against all your adversaries as they dart so lithely about the screen—and you’ll wonder why you ever found the game so overwhelming.
The Da Vinci Code (Xbox)

The Da Vinci Code review (XBX)

Reviewed on June 11, 2006

On the one hand, this is a satisfying way to fight that emphasis mental power over the ability to simply button mash. On the other, it just doesn’t feel quite natural. Fights seem to happen in fits and spurts. Worse, fighting multiple enemies turns into a ridiculous scenario where even if you press the buttons in just the right order, one of the other goons might step in and knock you in the face because you’re in the middle of performing a combo and can’t stop to deal with the obvious threat.
New Super Mario Bros. (DS)

New Super Mario Bros. review (DS)

Reviewed on May 20, 2006

I knew better than to hope for a DS game that could capture all of that for me again. Nostalgia sets unrealistic expectations. No, I’m not bitter because things weren’t exactly as I wished for them to be. In many ways, they came much closer than I ever expected. Instead, I’m upset because New Super Mario Bros. has too many issues that get in the way of a consistently good time.
Dreamfall: The Longest Journey (Xbox)

Dreamfall: The Longest Journey review (XBX)

Reviewed on May 19, 2006

As a result, there are plenty of times where you’ll be working through an area and the adventure is cut short because someone was alerted to your presence. The circumstances aren’t always the same—sometimes you’re ducking around robots and shards of glass, while others you might be trying to let the sound of a train mask your movements from a watchdog—but the frustration remains in tact.
Generation of Chaos (PSP)

Generation of Chaos review (PSP)

Reviewed on May 13, 2006

Every unit you command is controlled through this set-up. Each time you want to recruit someone to your cause, or give a gift to an especially useful warrior, or develop the land around a stronghold or whatever, you have to wade through menus. Those commands you might wish to use most frequently are generally two or three levels down, to boot.
LEGO Star Wars: The Video Game (PlayStation 2)

LEGO Star Wars: The Video Game review (PS2)

Reviewed on May 09, 2006

Most zones require rapid character swapping if you want to discover everything. For example, you might see a ledge you can’t reach. Your Jedi only has a limited jump, but perhaps you have Padme along. She can use her grappling hook to reach higher areas, then trip some switches so that her friends can follow. Or maybe there’s a hidden item. You can see it, but you can’t reach it.
The Silent Hill Experience (PSP)

The Silent Hill Experience review (PSP)

Reviewed on April 23, 2006

The Silent Hill Experience, while at heart no more than an expanded set of bonus features like you might find on an especially cool DVD release, is unnerving to an extreme. Instead of vibrant arrows and slick menus, you’ll sample the various goods the disc offers by stumbling through a building stained by rust and made of bricks covered in dry, coppery blood.
Hummer Badlands (Xbox)

Hummer Badlands review (XBX)

Reviewed on April 22, 2006

It’s not difficult to rush to the front of the pack, but the first curve you round will drop you back into the rear as your opponents navigate each turn with a professional combination of steering and acceleration that will leave even the best players green with envy. Even if you manage to build up a significant lead—say, half a lap—fumbling your way through one corner is enough to put you in fourth place.
Harvest Moon: Magical Melody (GameCube)

Harvest Moon: Magical Melody review (GCN)

Reviewed on April 20, 2006

Harvest Moon: Magical Melody clearly is not for everyone. I already mentioned it, but I’ll say it again: the visuals here look like something out of Animal Crossing. I know some people who refuse to play that game primarily because it doesn’t look mature enough. They’re afraid their image will suffer or something. Well, the same applies here.
From Russia with Love (PSP)

From Russia with Love review (PSP)

Reviewed on April 16, 2006

You hold the “L” button and watch as the auto-aim hairs pinpoint him. Once they do, you can hold the ‘square’ button, which lets you use the analogue stick to aim with more precision. You can use this cool trick to score head shots or to fire around crates, pillars and shields your adversaries might use to aid in their defense. It conserves ammunition, but there’s a more important reason to aim manually: it’s fun!
Rumble Roses XX (Xbox 360)

Rumble Roses XX review (X360)

Reviewed on April 08, 2006

Rumble Roses XX is not one of those games that uses visual flair to mask a complex game engine underneath. The graphics are an integral part of why the product works. Some people will hate that, but I honestly didn’t. It’s just one more thing that adds to this game’s appeal. Anyone can start grappling, dropkicking and bouncing off the ropes within a matter of minutes. It’s easy to pick up and play.
The Outfit (Xbox 360)

The Outfit review (X360)

Reviewed on April 03, 2006

The reason it’s not cool is that it doesn’t much feel like you’re destroying anything! When you blow up an enemy tank, there’s a bit of a boom and the vehicle becomes scrap metal. When you drive over a tent, it’s less satisfying than bursting a bubble on sheet of packing material. It sort of just folds underneath you.
The Godfather: The Game (Xbox)

The Godfather: The Game review (XBX)

Reviewed on April 01, 2006

Such moments keep things engaging long after you’ve finished the game’s plotted moments. There’s just something fun about walking into a bakery and telling a merchant that you have his best interests at heart. They aren’t generally inclined to believe you, which is when you have to talk some sense into them. Often, you do this with your fists. Maybe there’re some fragile items sitting on a nearby shelf. You can target them and smash them.
Mega Man: Maverick Hunter X (PSP)

Mega Man: Maverick Hunter X review (PSP)

Reviewed on March 26, 2006

When I began playing, I started out by heading to Chill Penguin’s stage. Partway through, I reached a chamber where I anticipated an upgrade that would allow X to dash. The familiar capsule never appeared. I beat the level without any boost to my armor. The same proved true of other locations, and it became obvious that not all was the same. Armor tweaks are still available, but now you have to work harder to find them.
Lumines (PSP)

Lumines review (PSP)

Reviewed on March 21, 2006

You’ll know when you’re there because your fingers will be moving as if they aren’t yours, and your score will be skyrocketing. You’ll be flicking tiles this way and that, dropping one in one place and hardly even noticing as it begins to flash because you’re already working with the next play.

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