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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Disgaea 2: Cursed Memories (PlayStation 2)

Disgaea 2: Cursed Memories review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 09, 2006

While Disgaea: Hour of Darkness was fascinating because of its frank discussion about silly subject matter, the sequel tries for a darker and more mature tone. Its attempts at humor seem almost half-hearted, and not just because of Adell. While it’s true that there are plenty of times you’ll smile at some of the jokes, they’re just not the focus they were previously.
Bomberman - Act: Zero (Xbox 360)

Bomberman - Act: Zero review (X360)

Reviewed on September 05, 2006

Despite all of its (well-intentioned?) efforts to give the series a fresh, hardcore coat of paint, it just doesn’t do enough things right for the aesthetic focus to mean anything more than that you’ve just dropped a wad of cash on a $10 game. The carefully-rendered backgrounds do a great job of slapping you across the face with the notion that this world is desolate, but they don’t add anything to the play mechanics.
Heart de Roommate (PC)

Heart de Roommate review (PC)

Reviewed on August 31, 2006

While it’s true that there is nudity, that’s not so much the focus as you might anticipate. You probably expect Yusuke to sneak around peeking in bathrooms when girls are bathing, spying on shower stalls at school, and maybe raping a few females for good measure. That’s just not the focus, though, and Heart de Roommate is better for it.
Miss Spider's Sunny Patch Friends: Harvest Time Hop and Fly (DS)

Miss Spider's Sunny Patch Friends: Harvest Time Hop and Fly review (DS)

Reviewed on August 28, 2006

A second stage type finds you controlling a dragonfly as he soars through the air on a fruit-gathering mission. He has to avoid floating flower seeds and other plants, as well as trickles of water that sometimes fall from above. Bumping into anything lowers his life meter, and splashing into liquid will slow him enough that he’ll miss valuable fruit or bump into something nasty. It’s like a horizontal shooter, only without the bullets or violence.
Garfield and His Nine Lives (Game Boy Advance)

Garfield and His Nine Lives review (GBA)

Reviewed on August 18, 2006

So, suppose you get almost to the end of the stage and you just can’t seem to get in a good position to kick that squirrel. He throws one acorn to many or a bird dive bombs you when you’re not expecting it and you take one hit more than your stamina can withstand. Garfield collapses to the ground and goes to sleep. That’s about as violent as the game ever gets, and what it really means in gamer terms is that you’ve just lost a life.
Civilization IV: Warlords (PC)

Civilization IV: Warlords review (PC)

Reviewed on August 17, 2006

When you get a warlord, you then get to decide which available unit you’d like to associate him with. So, let’s say you have a few groups of chariot-riding fiends. He can join them and their power will be boosted accordingly. But they’re hardly invincible, or else the game would be too imbalanced. No, they’re just the slightest bit stronger.
Blade Dancer: Lineage of Light (PSP)

Blade Dancer: Lineage of Light review (PSP)

Reviewed on August 16, 2006

Head outside of a town and it’s more of the same, with green plains stretching as far as you can see toward featureless hills broken up only by the occasional tree or stone walkway. There’s also plenty of mist, and you’ll see enemies patrolling. There aren’t random battles in Blade Dancer, just scripted events and other confrontations that you can often avoid simply by running from floating enemy icons (sometimes they’ll even run from you if they’re particularly week).
FlatOut 2 (PC)

FlatOut 2 review (PC)

Reviewed on August 15, 2006

Scattered throughout each of the available tracks are alternate routes you can take if the mood strikes you. Plenty of games have done that before, but usually it’s just something along the lines of "go left around the big tree instead of right." There’s some of that here, but it’s not emphasized so much as it is simply snuck into place.
Pac-Man (Xbox 360)

Pac-Man review (X360)

Reviewed on August 10, 2006

Blinky is riding you like a cowboy on a bronco and you’re doomed if you don’t reach the side warp in time. Every millisecond counts. You round a bend and you need to head left for safety, so you press the button. What happens on-screen? Pac-Man moves down.
Monster House (PlayStation 2)

Monster House review (PS2)

Reviewed on August 08, 2006

The level design takes advantage of each character’s unique attributes. If you’re in control of Chowder, you can expect fewer enemies, yet battles that are every bit as tough because your adversaries can take a lot of damage and keep right on attacking. Jenny, meanwhile, is constantly swarmed by animated chairs and other menaces that will bite savagely into her life meter if she doesn’t keep moving wide of their assault.
Galaga (Xbox 360)

Galaga review (X360)

Reviewed on August 05, 2006

So it is that we come to a new question: though Galaga has ‘worked’ for many years, how does it fare on the Xbox 360? The answer is that it does quite well for itself, if you’re not expecting anything more than what the game has always been.
Zelda II: The Adventure of Link (NES)

Zelda II: The Adventure of Link review (NES)

Reviewed on July 15, 2006

The reason Zelda II is special isn’t just the dungeons and their guardians, though, or the way it mixes two unique perspectives. What makes it so outstanding is how those elements contribute to the most tangible world the NES ever saw. It’s evident even in the way people talk about the game to this day.
Micro Machines V4 (PC)

Micro Machines V4 review (PC)

Reviewed on July 08, 2006

What could have been a tightly controlling game, then, is just an exercise in frustration. You never dare approach a corner at full speed because if you do, you’re pretty much screwed. This is true of any of the hundreds and hundreds of vehicles you can add to your collection, making their inclusion cosmetic rather than useful.
Marble Blast Ultra (Xbox 360)

Marble Blast Ultra review (X360)

Reviewed on July 05, 2006

As you race around the various stadiums trying to collect multi-colored gems ahead of your worthy opponents, you’ll find power-ups scattered all over the place. Some blow you up to giant size and let you send everyone who touches you flying. Others give you the ability to spring high into the air, or to rocket across most of the arena if you launch cleverly from the top of a ramp.
Feeding Frenzy (Xbox 360)

Feeding Frenzy review (X360)

Reviewed on June 25, 2006

Fish you couldn’t eat moments before suddenly become your victims, sort of like how the sticky ball you rolled around in Katamari Damacy couldn’t pick up a mouse one minute, but later rolled up an entire skyscraper on a single pass. Of course, there are a few key differences.
Gradius Collection (PSP)

Gradius Collection review (PSP)

Reviewed on June 14, 2006

When the ship begins, it fires small pellets in a straight path. These are soon supplemented with peripheral shots, lasers and shields that give you a better chance against whatever the alien empire you’re battling happens to throw your way. Soon, your painfully slow ship will move more efficiently—this finally gives you a chance against all your adversaries as they dart so lithely about the screen—and you’ll wonder why you ever found the game so overwhelming.
The Da Vinci Code (Xbox)

The Da Vinci Code review (XBX)

Reviewed on June 11, 2006

On the one hand, this is a satisfying way to fight that emphasis mental power over the ability to simply button mash. On the other, it just doesn’t feel quite natural. Fights seem to happen in fits and spurts. Worse, fighting multiple enemies turns into a ridiculous scenario where even if you press the buttons in just the right order, one of the other goons might step in and knock you in the face because you’re in the middle of performing a combo and can’t stop to deal with the obvious threat.
New Super Mario Bros. (DS)

New Super Mario Bros. review (DS)

Reviewed on May 20, 2006

I knew better than to hope for a DS game that could capture all of that for me again. Nostalgia sets unrealistic expectations. No, I’m not bitter because things weren’t exactly as I wished for them to be. In many ways, they came much closer than I ever expected. Instead, I’m upset because New Super Mario Bros. has too many issues that get in the way of a consistently good time.
Dreamfall: The Longest Journey (Xbox)

Dreamfall: The Longest Journey review (XBX)

Reviewed on May 19, 2006

As a result, there are plenty of times where you’ll be working through an area and the adventure is cut short because someone was alerted to your presence. The circumstances aren’t always the same—sometimes you’re ducking around robots and shards of glass, while others you might be trying to let the sound of a train mask your movements from a watchdog—but the frustration remains in tact.
Generation of Chaos (PSP)

Generation of Chaos review (PSP)

Reviewed on May 13, 2006

Every unit you command is controlled through this set-up. Each time you want to recruit someone to your cause, or give a gift to an especially useful warrior, or develop the land around a stronghold or whatever, you have to wade through menus. Those commands you might wish to use most frequently are generally two or three levels down, to boot.

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