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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
LUXOR: Pharaoh's Challenge (PlayStation 2)

LUXOR: Pharaoh's Challenge review (PS2)

Reviewed on November 29, 2007

If you've played a lot of puzzle games besides Tetris, you've probably encountered one where your goal is to stop colored marbles from rolling too far along a winding track. This is typically accomplished by tossing a few marbles of your own so that three of a single color end up next to each other, flash and then disappear. Sometimes, a chain reaction is possible, with multiple groups vanishing at once. Sound familiar?
Time Crisis 4 (PlayStation 3)

Time Crisis 4 review (PS3)

Reviewed on November 29, 2007

Time Crisis 4 doesn't stray far from the formula its predecessors embraced. There's really no reason it should. As your characters walk into an airport, someone tosses a smoke bomb their way and just like that, the action has begun. From that lobby, you'll make your way through all sorts of chaotic events that range from a gunfight in the streets to a stroll through a dark cave to a helicopter ride where you're causing everything but the towering skyscrapers to explode in a fiery inferno.
Uncharted: Drake's Fortune (PlayStation 3)

Uncharted: Drake's Fortune review (PS3)

Reviewed on November 26, 2007

Of course, Uncharted is a game. It's not a perfect one, either. That means that for all of its visual splendor and for every moment you're so immersed that you'd jump out of your skin if the phone rang—and really, that side of things can't possibly be emphasized enough—the title sometimes pulls you out of its version of reality and unceremoniously dumps you in mediocrity's lap.
Strawberry Shortcake: The Four Seasons Cake (DS)

Strawberry Shortcake: The Four Seasons Cake review (DS)

Reviewed on November 26, 2007

Of course, whether or not little girls are ready to solve some of the challenges here is a matter that's up for some debate. There's nothing particularly taxing until right near the end, but at the same time, sometimes the answer might not be clear. Believe it or not, the game eventually gets rather rough and actually requires a bit of platforming skill.
Assassin's Creed (Xbox 360)

Assassin's Creed review (X360)

Reviewed on November 23, 2007

When you first enter a city, you'll generally follow the same process: climb a tower to reveal more of the map, visit your guild, investigate until you have enough clues to find your target, then take his life. Along the way, you can stop soldiers from picking on unlucky citizens and you can scale the tallest structures to aid in your search, but a lot of that is unnecessary and time-consuming. Even the investigations themselves grow old, since they almost always involve punching someone a few times, picking a pocket or sitting down on a bench to eavesdrop on suspicious characters.
Rayman: Raving Rabbids 2 (Wii)

Rayman: Raving Rabbids 2 review (WII)

Reviewed on November 20, 2007

Regardless of the game type you choose to play, you can't lose. That's literal, since your goal isn't to survive, but to rack up the highest possible score. If your Wii has an Internet connection, you can then check online leaderboards to see how you rate compared to other gamers throughout the world. Even if your only competition is the game itself, though, you'll find that achieving a gold medal is a nice challenge (particularly in some cases).
Build-A-Bear Workshop (DS)

Build-A-Bear Workshop review (DS)

Reviewed on November 19, 2007

If you're a parent and you don't mind walking your kid through the process the first few times, or if you have a boy or girl that's approaching the double digits and you want to provide him or her with an innocent alternative to some of the more violent fare on the market, you could do a lot worse than Build-A-Bear Workshop.
Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare (Xbox 360)

Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare review (X360)

Reviewed on November 16, 2007

It's not the plot twists that will keep you playing so much as it is the sense that you're a part of them. As you head through the cities and the farmlands of present-day Russia, you're not some tourist dropped off somewhere to look at the pretty scenery; you're a soldier (multiple soldiers, actually, since the game shifts perspectives over the course of its 20 or so missions) exploring an unforgiving, hostile landscape where one careless step could spell disaster. This is a war. People on all sides will die and your goal is to make sure that you come through it all in one piece.
Aqua Teen Hunger Force: Zombie Ninja Pro-Am (PlayStation 2)

Aqua Teen Hunger Force: Zombie Ninja Pro-Am review (PS2)

Reviewed on November 15, 2007

To win the game, you must progress through twelve levels. Each is sandwiched between brief but amusing cutscenes featuring voices provided by the people responsible for the TV series. The cinema sequences set things up nicely as the trio of heroes advances from one stage to the next, but don't really hide the fact that the fun diminishes significantly once you actually start playing. That's because with the exception of a tutorial and three racing events, every stage unfolds the same way.
Conan (PlayStation 3)

Conan review (PS3)

Reviewed on November 07, 2007

You'll realize that early on, as you're ascending a crumbling tower in your quest to destroy a rampaging dragon. Along the way, you'll face his fire-breathing muzzle at several turns. Each time, the strategy is the same: dodge his attacks, then retaliate with some sword strokes. After several such instances, the developers threw in a little variety, and in the end it's not your sword that spells the dragon's doom but rather the available architecture. It's one of the game's highlights (along with a similar battle with a mammoth and later one with a giant squid), but somehow it doesn't feel like quite enough.
Disgaea: Afternoon of Darkness (PSP)

Disgaea: Afternoon of Darkness review (PSP)

Reviewed on November 05, 2007

Accessed once you complete the original adventure (or with a code from the title screen), Etna Mode is a retelling of the classic story that begins with Etna trying to wake Laharl from his slumber... then accidentally shooting him in the head. As the late Overlord's son crumples into his casket, the red-headed heroine realizes she has a problem. The nearly 40 hours of gameplay that follow answer the question of what the Netherworld would do without its self-absorbed prince.
Tony Hawk's Proving Ground (Xbox 360)

Tony Hawk's Proving Ground review (X360)

Reviewed on November 03, 2007

Tony Hawk's Proving Ground definitely could have used more enhancements like 'nail the grab' and less of the other crap. Nowhere is that clearer than when it comes to the various missions you are expected to complete. Now you have not just one plot, but several. You progress through each of them in roughly the order you like. If you get tired of bowling for hoodlums, perhaps you can head to the park for a skate competition instead.
Puzzle Quest: Challenge of the Warlords (Xbox 360)

Puzzle Quest: Challenge of the Warlords review (X360)

Reviewed on November 01, 2007

Though at some level the creatures you fight in Puzzle Quest are just there as window dressing, they actually do bring a lot to the table. When you are traveling from one city to another and a sand worm attacks, you'll react differently than you might if battling a wyvern in the mountains. The result is that even though you're for the most part playing the same puzzle game for hours on end, it doesn't get as redundant as you might imagine.
Dewy's Adventure (Wii)

Dewy's Adventure review (WII)

Reviewed on October 20, 2007

The Wii Remote controller is held sideways, like a classic NES controller, and your motions theoretically determine where the hero—a drop of water—rolls. I say 'theoretically' because a slight flick of the wrist could be enough to make him edge along a precipice, or it could have no apparent impact at all, or it could send him careening forward and to his doom. The sense that you're in full control never really hits home because the minute you start to feel confident, an unexpected fumble comes along that craps all over the notion.
Looney Tunes: Duck Amuck (DS)

Looney Tunes: Duck Amuck review (DS)

Reviewed on October 18, 2007

In Duck Amuck, your goal is not to save the princess, or to make Daffy as wealthy as possible, or to show Bugs Bunny once and for all which mascot is superior. You aren't even sparing the cartoon world an invasion from Marvin the Martian. In fact, though Daffy is clearly the star of the show, you're not helping him do anything great at all. Instead, you're trying to ruffle his feathers. You win the game when he gets so angry that he blows his top. That's it. End of story.
Lair (PlayStation 3)

Lair review (PS3)

Reviewed on September 28, 2007

The gamer in you will probably wish that your mount didn't take so long to turn, but consider how unrealistic it would be if you could maneuver through the air like a sports coup with wings. You might argue that realism went out the door the minute mythological monsters entered the equation, but one fact remains: riding on a beast's back should feel... beastly.
PaRappa the Rapper (PSP)

PaRappa the Rapper review (PSP)

Reviewed on September 27, 2007

Each opponent is quite bizarre. For example, you'll first face a karate master shaped like an onion. He busts rhymes about kicking and punching, and you have to respond in kind. The other key characters are a driving instructor that looks like a moose, a reggae-loving frog at a flea market and an obnoxious chicken that hosts a television cooking show.
Worms: Open Warfare 2 (DS)

Worms: Open Warfare 2 review (DS)

Reviewed on September 22, 2007

Even though there's an effective tutorial at the onset of the game (which you can skip if you're so inclined), getting a handle on the destructive implements available can prove difficult. Options like the flaming fist that lets you knock your opponents backward with a cry of “Shoryuken!” are cool and have predictable results, but more standard fare like the bazooka definitely doesn't.
R.C. Pro-Am II (NES)

R.C. Pro-Am II review (NES)

Reviewed on September 17, 2007

Now instead of finding a few simple upgrade icons littering the track, you can snag money bags. These allow you to outfit your vehicle as you see fit, whether that be in the form of improved tires that let you take tighter corners or more powerful engines that render your opponents irrelevant. There's more strategy involved, both as you struggle to secure the most cash on each lap (since your opponents can pick them up before you if you get careless) and as you invest in the perfect vehicular modifications.
Duck Tales (NES)

Duck Tales review (NES)

Reviewed on September 15, 2007

Duck Tales works so well because it remains faithful to the adventurous spirit that made its source material such a resounding success. After selecting a stage, you're dropped into what at first feels like just another level from any cutesy platformer. As you head to the right, though, you'll quickly realize that something is different: you have options!

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