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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by honestgamer and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation - Hard Evidence (Wii)

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation - Hard Evidence review (WII)

Reviewed on January 31, 2008

Often, the interface is the issue. The Wii Remote directs a cursor on the screen. Hover near the edge and, if there's more to see in that direction, the view will glide until you've reached a boundary. The same is true of vertical planes. When you pass over something interactive, your cursor turns into a bright green arrow or a hand. Then you can use your tool kit to collect items or bring latent fingerprints into view. There's no question that it feels authentic to the show, but there are times when it's also slightly unfair.
Furu Furu Park (Wii)

Furu Furu Park review (WII)

Reviewed on January 29, 2008

Consider Bubble Bobble. You can still capture enemies in bubbles and collect the fruit they leave behind, only now there's no advancing to another screen. You just keep playing for most of two minutes—if you can survive that long, which isn't terribly difficult—and then your score is tallied. That's the beginning and end of Bubble Bobble, at least in Furu Furu Park.
Super Swing Golf: Season 2 (Wii)

Super Swing Golf: Season 2 review (WII)

Reviewed on January 26, 2008

After earning your Pang, you can then then head to the clubhouse to spend them on things like cute bathing suits and alternate club sets, if they're available in the inventory. Most of these accessories affect not only how your chosen character looks, but also how he or she performs.
MX vs ATV Untamed (PlayStation 3)

MX vs ATV Untamed review (PS3)

Reviewed on January 10, 2008

That means that if you hate the MX moments, you'll likely despise the frequent stretches where you're forced to drive a motorcycle. The worst news of all, though, is that you have to clear each track twice consecutively within a series of events. Once you finish a race the first time, regardless of your position, you have to turn around and immediately play through it again (or exit out and lose your progress).
Super Mario Galaxy (Wii)

Super Mario Galaxy review (WII)

Reviewed on December 18, 2007

Once he satisfies the current requirements, a new launch pad appears and he can rocket off to his next adventure. Usually, it's another planet with a new assignment. Each area mixes objectives so often that it's almost impossible to get bored because there's always something new on hand. Sometimes you'll clear a stage and go back to it not because you have to, but because you're not yet finished having fun!
Left Brain Right Brain (DS)

Left Brain Right Brain review (DS)

Reviewed on December 11, 2007

After you've completed a set of exercises, the game will present a handy little chart that shows where you've proven your skills lie. Both left and right hand are rated, so you can see what difference there really is. For the most part, that's the hook behind the whole game. You're essentially playing just another Brain Age clone, only this one actually has a unique purpose that helps it stand apart from the crowded field of peers.
WordJong (DS)

WordJong review (DS)

Reviewed on December 07, 2007

The change actually makes for a much more interesting experience, since your mind is now put to the test a bit more. There often will be a few options available, so your job is to figure out which will do the most to help your score. For example, why settle for 'cede' if the letters for 'succeed' happen to be available?
Draglade (DS)

Draglade review (DS)

Reviewed on December 04, 2007

You can choose from four characters. Each has a separate plot, but they all go through the same checkpoints. Once you've finished one tale, the only reason to brave the massive amount of recycled material is the character you'll unlock for versus mode. From locations to bosses to key events, almost nothing is utilized only once. This probably isn't a huge surprise and it wouldn't even be so bad except that there are only a few places to visit in the whole game!
Monopoly (Nintendo 64)

Monopoly review (N64)

Reviewed on December 04, 2007

I'd meant what I said about the iron. He's easily the most expressive of the available choices. When you land on his property and have to pay rent, he'll chuckle silently but deviously. When he arrives on a space that is to his financial gain, he'll pump his arms enthusiastically. Even when he's standing still, he looks just maniacal enough that you can't help but root for his success.
Trauma Center: New Blood (Wii)

Trauma Center: New Blood review (WII)

Reviewed on November 30, 2007

With two doctors available for each stage, you can partner up with a skilled buddy to zap viruses and set bones. As the timer ticks down and you combine your skills, you'll be sharing an experience unique to Trauma Center. It's fantastic if you can manage it, but let's face it: not all of us have friends, let alone talented ones. For such individuals, there may be times when the game feels nearly impossible.
LUXOR: Pharaoh's Challenge (PlayStation 2)

LUXOR: Pharaoh's Challenge review (PS2)

Reviewed on November 29, 2007

If you've played a lot of puzzle games besides Tetris, you've probably encountered one where your goal is to stop colored marbles from rolling too far along a winding track. This is typically accomplished by tossing a few marbles of your own so that three of a single color end up next to each other, flash and then disappear. Sometimes, a chain reaction is possible, with multiple groups vanishing at once. Sound familiar?
Time Crisis 4 (PlayStation 3)

Time Crisis 4 review (PS3)

Reviewed on November 29, 2007

Time Crisis 4 doesn't stray far from the formula its predecessors embraced. There's really no reason it should. As your characters walk into an airport, someone tosses a smoke bomb their way and just like that, the action has begun. From that lobby, you'll make your way through all sorts of chaotic events that range from a gunfight in the streets to a stroll through a dark cave to a helicopter ride where you're causing everything but the towering skyscrapers to explode in a fiery inferno.
Uncharted: Drake's Fortune (PlayStation 3)

Uncharted: Drake's Fortune review (PS3)

Reviewed on November 26, 2007

Of course, Uncharted is a game. It's not a perfect one, either. That means that for all of its visual splendor and for every moment you're so immersed that you'd jump out of your skin if the phone rang—and really, that side of things can't possibly be emphasized enough—the title sometimes pulls you out of its version of reality and unceremoniously dumps you in mediocrity's lap.
Strawberry Shortcake: The Four Seasons Cake (DS)

Strawberry Shortcake: The Four Seasons Cake review (DS)

Reviewed on November 26, 2007

Of course, whether or not little girls are ready to solve some of the challenges here is a matter that's up for some debate. There's nothing particularly taxing until right near the end, but at the same time, sometimes the answer might not be clear. Believe it or not, the game eventually gets rather rough and actually requires a bit of platforming skill.
Assassin's Creed (Xbox 360)

Assassin's Creed review (X360)

Reviewed on November 23, 2007

When you first enter a city, you'll generally follow the same process: climb a tower to reveal more of the map, visit your guild, investigate until you have enough clues to find your target, then take his life. Along the way, you can stop soldiers from picking on unlucky citizens and you can scale the tallest structures to aid in your search, but a lot of that is unnecessary and time-consuming. Even the investigations themselves grow old, since they almost always involve punching someone a few times, picking a pocket or sitting down on a bench to eavesdrop on suspicious characters.
Rayman: Raving Rabbids 2 (Wii)

Rayman: Raving Rabbids 2 review (WII)

Reviewed on November 20, 2007

Regardless of the game type you choose to play, you can't lose. That's literal, since your goal isn't to survive, but to rack up the highest possible score. If your Wii has an Internet connection, you can then check online leaderboards to see how you rate compared to other gamers throughout the world. Even if your only competition is the game itself, though, you'll find that achieving a gold medal is a nice challenge (particularly in some cases).
Build-A-Bear Workshop (DS)

Build-A-Bear Workshop review (DS)

Reviewed on November 19, 2007

If you're a parent and you don't mind walking your kid through the process the first few times, or if you have a boy or girl that's approaching the double digits and you want to provide him or her with an innocent alternative to some of the more violent fare on the market, you could do a lot worse than Build-A-Bear Workshop.
Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare (Xbox 360)

Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare review (X360)

Reviewed on November 16, 2007

It's not the plot twists that will keep you playing so much as it is the sense that you're a part of them. As you head through the cities and the farmlands of present-day Russia, you're not some tourist dropped off somewhere to look at the pretty scenery; you're a soldier (multiple soldiers, actually, since the game shifts perspectives over the course of its 20 or so missions) exploring an unforgiving, hostile landscape where one careless step could spell disaster. This is a war. People on all sides will die and your goal is to make sure that you come through it all in one piece.
Aqua Teen Hunger Force: Zombie Ninja Pro-Am (PlayStation 2)

Aqua Teen Hunger Force: Zombie Ninja Pro-Am review (PS2)

Reviewed on November 15, 2007

To win the game, you must progress through twelve levels. Each is sandwiched between brief but amusing cutscenes featuring voices provided by the people responsible for the TV series. The cinema sequences set things up nicely as the trio of heroes advances from one stage to the next, but don't really hide the fact that the fun diminishes significantly once you actually start playing. That's because with the exception of a tutorial and three racing events, every stage unfolds the same way.
Conan (PlayStation 3)

Conan review (PS3)

Reviewed on November 07, 2007

You'll realize that early on, as you're ascending a crumbling tower in your quest to destroy a rampaging dragon. Along the way, you'll face his fire-breathing muzzle at several turns. Each time, the strategy is the same: dodge his attacks, then retaliate with some sword strokes. After several such instances, the developers threw in a little variety, and in the end it's not your sword that spells the dragon's doom but rather the available architecture. It's one of the game's highlights (along with a similar battle with a mammoth and later one with a giant squid), but somehow it doesn't feel like quite enough.

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