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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (PlayStation)

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone review (PSX)

Reviewed on December 29, 2012

Actually playing the game itself isn’t quite so bad, though it is horrifically easy. You’ll likely require only a few hours to beat it, and only a very small portion of the obstacles you face during that time will prove even remotely challenging.
wolfqueen001's avatar
Dishonored (PC)

Dishonored review (PC)

Reviewed on December 27, 2012

A fun, if disingenuous experience.
bbbmoney's avatar
Deathsmiles II X (Xbox 360)

Deathsmiles II X review (X360)

Reviewed on December 24, 2012

Released on the Xbox 360 as a retail title in Japan, it did not meet the same fate elsewhere, dooming it, like so many standalone shoot-em-ups these days, as an NTSC J exclusive. However, the Cave-developed horizontal shooter still managed to find an outlet in the most interesting of places: Xbox Live's Games on Demand US service.
pickhut's avatar
Tank! Tank! Tank! (Wii U)

Tank! Tank! Tank! review (WIIU)

Reviewed on December 24, 2012

Unfortunately, the only objective you’re ever given is to kill everything that moves. That’s not entirely bad, since mayhem can be a lot of fun, but there aren’t enough enemy types available to keep things interesting across so many stages. You’ll wind up fighting most of the same monster waves three or four times over the course of the campaign, and the last 20 stages or so are mostly just battles against the same few giant enemies.
honestgamer's avatar
Knytt Underground (PlayStation 3)

Knytt Underground review (PS3)

Reviewed on December 24, 2012

You've probably never heard of Knytt. It's pretty underground. *laughtrack*
Roto13's avatar
Midway Arcade Origins (PlayStation 3)

Midway Arcade Origins review (PS3)

Reviewed on December 22, 2012

If you grew up around arcades, Midway Arcade Origins is likely to disappoint you because many of the games simply don’t control the way you remember. Home conversions did a great job of making the classic arcade titles function on inferior hardware, and yet these new releases abandon that refinement in favor of ill-advised faithfulness to old code that no longer matches contemporary hardware.
honestgamer's avatar
Elements of Destruction (Xbox 360)

Elements of Destruction review (X360)

Reviewed on December 21, 2012

Getting laid off sucks, especially if you've dedicated 60 years of your life to a company. As the employer, there has to be a certain finesse to breaking the news to said person... hopefully.
pickhut's avatar
Silent Hill (PlayStation)

Silent Hill review (PSX)

Reviewed on December 20, 2012

Silent Hill draws a map of the human psyche and at the edge of that map places a sign reading “Here be Monsters.”
zippdementia's avatar
Hotline Miami (PC)

Hotline Miami review (PC)

Reviewed on December 17, 2012

Trance out to some bopping electronic music and wipe the floor with thugs.
bbbmoney's avatar
Party of Sin (PC)

Party of Sin review (PC)

Reviewed on December 16, 2012

The fighting portion of Party of Sin is the weakest link, albeit a solid effort. For example, Gluttony can swallow a vulnerable angel whole for more health; it's a nifty skill to have when gunfire is flying from every direction and there isn't an apple in sight. Unfortunately, being able to attack and digest simultaneously broke combat variety for me; I had uncovered an impromptu easy mode, and every other Sin just wasn't worth the effort.
Mandy's avatar
Rabbids Land (Wii U)

Rabbids Land review (WIIU)

Reviewed on December 16, 2012

The game changes up who faces who during each event, which keeps things relatively even and ensures that no single player is always stuck going up against a computer opponent. Still, the whole process is definitely the most fun if you are competing with at least two human friends… even though that means you’ll be passing the gamepad and any other controllers around the room as if they’re participants in a game of musical chairs.
honestgamer's avatar
Game Party Champions (Wii U)

Game Party Champions review (WIIU)

Reviewed on December 16, 2012

However, the game is more challenging for newcomers than the developers likely intended, mostly due to the control scheme. The game simply requires more precision from the touch pad than it allows. For instance, the Basketball attraction features three hoops that move toward the screen, then recede or spin. You have to move the gamepad to affect the direction your arrow points, and then you have to swipe the stylus just the right amount so that you throw the ball hard enough but not too hard.
honestgamer's avatar
Wario's Woods (NES)

Wario's Woods review (NES)

Reviewed on December 16, 2012

Back before he became a game developer, Wario liked to harass small woodland creatures.
Roto13's avatar
Batman Returns (NES)

Batman Returns review (NES)

Reviewed on December 14, 2012

When I think of effective beat 'em ups, adjectives like "awesome" and "badass" come to mind, and those are the last words I'd use to describe a gang of combat-trained circus performers. Sorry, but I'll take broken bottles and seedy night clubs over frills, grease paint, and leotards any day.
JoeTheDestroyer's avatar
Counter-Strike: Global Offensive (PC)

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive review (PC)

Reviewed on December 11, 2012

Defusal or death
bbbmoney's avatar
Disney Epic Mickey 2: The Power of Two (Wii U)

Disney Epic Mickey 2: The Power of Two review (WIIU)

Reviewed on December 11, 2012

Unfortunately, Disney Epic Mickey 2: The Power of Two is a disappointment compared to its imperfect but promising predecessor. The ambition and inventiveness that were so evident the first time around have been obscured by a sloppy retread that may well leave you wondering why anyone bothered to create it.
honestgamer's avatar
Batman Returns (Genesis)

Batman Returns review (GEN)

Reviewed on December 10, 2012

I somehow mistook Batman Returns' gloomy cold opening, where the Caped Crusader fights his way to the top of a building and failing to save the Ice Princess from a plunge, as a sign that this side-scrolling platformer might be good.
pickhut's avatar
NightSky (3DS)

NightSky review (3DS)

Reviewed on December 09, 2012

Sometimes, the levels will blur together and proceed quickly, with little to no challenge. When the ball gets to rolling swiftly through these areas, you're offered a free and spirited look into the essence of Nightsky. It has come together; it meshes. I think NightSky would have been better suited not to be a puzzler; instead, perhaps it shouldn't have been a game at all, but rather an interactive story. Nicalis clearly knows how to tug at your heart, as all of the game's flaws will assured...
Linkamoto's avatar
Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest (SNES)

Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest review (SNES)

Reviewed on December 09, 2012

First, a company comes out with a game that has potential and is terrific in some aspects, but it lacks a bit overall. In the case of Rare's Donkey Kong Country, the Super Nintendo played host to an absolutely gorgeous platformer that just didn't live up to the (admittedly very high) standard set for that system by Super Mario World. It was solid and it tended to be enjoyable, but no new ground was broken and things could get repetitive. It seemed to be the ultimate in playing it safe — a game that could have come with a disclaimer: "You've done all this before, but it's never looked this good… has it?!" With Donkey Kong Country 2: Diddy's Kong Quest, it's safe to say that Rare’s developers were through with the whole "testing the waters" phase, as they not only improved on the original, but managed to create one of the top platformers I've ever played.
overdrive's avatar
Wipeout 3 (Wii U)

Wipeout 3 review (WIIU)

Reviewed on December 07, 2012

Courses in Wipeout 3 feature a variety of obstacles, but for the most part the differences between one hazard and the next are cosmetic. You’ll need to swim across pools of murky water sometimes, but in general you are running along platforms that are suspended above a massive liquid field. Falling into soup when you’re not supposed to will knock you back to the last checkpoint.
honestgamer's avatar

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