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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Mega Man 4 (NES)

Mega Man 4 review (NES)

Reviewed on February 02, 2004

Mega Man has been a part of gaming for longer than some of the younger gamers have been alive. For over a decade and a half the little blue guy has been running around 2D levels blasting evil robots and making pixel perfect jumps. It's a formula that, save a few exceptions such as Battle Network and Legends, has stayed pretty much unchanged for all of his gaming career. Most series would have lost all their fans years ago if this happened (step forward Ms. Croft), but not Mega Man, he just stays...
tomclark's avatar
Ninja Gaiden (NES)

Ninja Gaiden review (NES)

Reviewed on February 02, 2004

There are moments that define your video gaming career. The first time you play a game in an arcade. The first console that you ever own. The first time you complete a game. And, for many veterans of the NES days, the first time you beat Shadow Warriors: Ninja Gaiden (or just plain Ninja Gaiden as it's known outside of Europe). Those who weren't there can't possibly understand what it was like.... playing through those last few levels.... it was harsh. Sometimes, at night, I still wake up scream...
tomclark's avatar
Super Mario Bros. 2 (NES)

Super Mario Bros. 2 review (NES)

Reviewed on February 02, 2004

Call it destiny. Call it fate. Call it ka, if you will. But something was obviously at work in Nintendo Towers on the day they decided not to release the original version of Super Mario Bros. 2 in the western world, choosing instead to paint the Mario characters onto an existing yet obscure Japanese platform game called Doki! Doki! Panic!. Because as great as the original Mario 2 is (and it's subsequent release on the SNES' Super Mario AllStars, and later on the Game Boy Color's Super Mario Bros...
tomclark's avatar
Super Mario Bros. 3 (NES)

Super Mario Bros. 3 review (NES)

Reviewed on February 02, 2004

There are certain games that become legends. Games which become the benchmark by which all others of their genre are judged. In the heyday of the NES, Super Mario Bros. 3 was such a game, and although facing fierce competition from it's SNES cousin, many people still consider Mario 3 to be the pinnacle of 2D platform gaming. Because, well, it's pretty good, really.
tomclark's avatar
Time Lord (NES)

Time Lord review (NES)

Reviewed on February 02, 2004

Time Lord was released in the Milton Bradley range of games (that included the similarly under-appreciated Digger T. Rock), and received only minimal attention when it came out. I too was among the crowd who really didn't pay this game it's due at that time. I was given this game the same Christmas that I was given Mega Man 2, and I spent so much time on Mega Man's game that Time Lord was given only a few courtesy plays before being put aside for nearly a year. Then, one Autumnal evening, I pick...
tomclark's avatar
XDR: X-Dazedly-Ray (Genesis)

XDR: X-Dazedly-Ray review (GEN)

Reviewed on February 02, 2004

XDR stands for X-Dazedly-Ray. I couldn't have made that up if I tried. I mean, dazedly? What the hell is that all about? And I love how designers Unipac hyphenated the parts, as if that makes the whole somehow make sense. They would have done better to allow the three letters to keep their mystery! That would have afforded us the opportunity to discuss the possibility of the name's origin in clandestine instant messenger chatrooms, or else on shadowy, cultish internet boards dedicated to talking up bad shooters based solely on their obscurity! But Unipac ruined it for us.
Masters's avatar
Seasons of the Sakura (PC)

Seasons of the Sakura review (PC)

Reviewed on February 01, 2004

I look at Seasons of the Sakura and I think to myself, ''hey, this is bad! I'm doing more for these anime girls than I would probably do for real ones!''
dogma's avatar
Xenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zur Macht (PlayStation 2)

Xenosaga Episode I: Der Wille zur Macht review (PS2)

Reviewed on February 01, 2004

Remember all those excellent PSone and SNES RPGs we were blessed with? When I think of my PS2 I wonder where the hell all the good RPGs are. Sure, we’ve had some solid games like Suikoden III and Final Fantasy X, but the PS2 has nowhere near the same amount of great titles as those two systems. Namco is trying to give disgruntled fans like myself what we want with their massive 5-game Xenosaga series. Rumors say that this sci-fi epic will span two to three different cons...
djskittles's avatar
WarioWare, Inc: Mega Microgame$! (Game Boy Advance)

WarioWare, Inc: Mega Microgame$! review (GBA)

Reviewed on January 31, 2004

I see a game like Wario Ware Inc: Mega Microgames being played from the passenger seat by a gamer tired of looking out the window on a drab car ride.
dogma's avatar
Activision Anthology (PlayStation 2)

Activision Anthology review (PS2)

Reviewed on January 31, 2004

Activision was kind enough to include scans of original instruction manuals, and it's fun to see the lame covers that decorated these early classics, if you're not lucky enough to own them yourself. Not only that, but I guess back in the day there were patches you could earn for good gameplay. Those are included here, too, and you can unlock them the same as always: by kicking butt and taking names.
honestgamer's avatar
WarioWare, Inc: Mega Microgame$! (Game Boy Advance)

WarioWare, Inc: Mega Microgame$! review (GBA)

Reviewed on January 30, 2004

If there's one flaw in the whole presentation, it's that sometimes the games begin so quickly, you don't really have time to react to your surroundings. You'll start to mess up more than you would if you had time to get your bearings. Of course, the frantic pace throughout is the reward for putting up with this apparent lack of polish, and it overwhelms any general objections one might have to the game as a whole.
honestgamer's avatar
19XX: The War Against Destiny (Arcade)

19XX: The War Against Destiny review (ARC)

Reviewed on January 30, 2004

Sometimes, it’s amazing how one little section of a video game can completely alter one’s perspective of it. It can be amazing how a game that could be considered merely decent can suddenly take on a whole new life because one sparkling effort by the programmers was pulled off so unbelievably well that the entire experience is enriched.
overdrive's avatar
Bushido Blade (PlayStation)

Bushido Blade review (PSX)

Reviewed on January 30, 2004

Imagine two swordsmen facing each other across the moonlit pagoda courtyard. The older man holds his blade steady in a frontal kendo stance, and the younger brandishes a sabre above his head. As the silence of the night punctuates the tension, the brash youngster charges headfirst at the wizened master. A single strike, a single clatter of steel, and both men fall face-first to the ground, dead.
zigfried's avatar
Mega Man 2 (NES)

Mega Man 2 review (NES)

Reviewed on January 29, 2004

One of the most bizarre attributes of most series of video games in which each game is connected is that your hero apparently lacks the ability to retain the special attacks he learns in early quests to apply to future endeavors.
overdrive's avatar
1944: The Loop Master (Arcade)

1944: The Loop Master review (ARC)

Reviewed on January 28, 2004

When playing 1944: The Loop Master, the fourth game in Capcom’s World War II series of shoot-em-up’s, one thought should be in the head of any American citizen:
overdrive's avatar
Dance Dance Revolution Konamix (PlayStation)

Dance Dance Revolution Konamix review (PSX)

Reviewed on January 28, 2004

Usually a game consists of a plot, enemies of some sort, a character you control and an ending after completing the game. Dance Dance Revolution Konamix does not have any of these elements, but is one of the most addictive games in recent memory. Based on the incredibly popular arcade versions, this dancing game doesn’t disappoint. Most of you probably snicker when you hear the words “dancing game.” I laughed at those words too; until I gave DDR a chance. Once I started playing I j...
djskittles's avatar
Metal Gear Solid (PlayStation)

Metal Gear Solid review (PSX)

Reviewed on January 28, 2004

I have been a big gaming fan for a few years now, but I probably would be nothing more than a casual gamer right now if I hadn't of come across Metal Gear Solid. Metal Gear Solid (MGS) was THE game that made me so desperately want a Playstation. I would go to Wal-Mart and play the MGS demo every time I went there. No matter how many times I played the demo, it never got old.
shady's avatar
Mr. Driller (Dreamcast)

Mr. Driller review (DC)

Reviewed on January 28, 2004

I enjoy a good puzzle game every now and then. Games like Tetris, Chip's Challenge, and Snood have all wasted a lot of time for me. That's what good puzzlers are - time wasters. They are easy to pick up and play, they're fun, and they're addictive. Mr. Driller (for the Dreamcast) is another example of such a game. Mr. Driller is a very simple game, but it is still incredibly challenging at the same time.
shady's avatar
Tennis 2K2 (Dreamcast)

Tennis 2K2 review (DC)

Reviewed on January 28, 2004

I'm not a big fan of tennis, so I wasn't expecting much from Tennis 2K2. I didn't think that repeatedly hitting a ball over the net would be too fun.
shady's avatar
Dino Crisis (Dreamcast)

Dino Crisis review (DC)

Reviewed on January 28, 2004

Resident Evil! Jurassic Park! Survival horror!
shady's avatar

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