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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
One Must Fall 2097 (PC)

One Must Fall 2097 review (PC)

Reviewed on May 03, 2008

Long ago there was a meeting of video game reviewers held in the seventh circle of Hell without violent people. I remember that I was casually chatting away with the heretics from the sixth circle when I was asked if I could ever give a game a perfect score to which I replied that it would never happen because it meant that the game was perfect with no way of improving whatsoever and there simply was no such game.
darketernal's avatar
Sins of a Solar Empire (PC)

Sins of a Solar Empire review (PC)

Reviewed on May 02, 2008

It’s not uncommon for a game to end with hundreds of ships on screen at once, engaged in constant combat while each player struggles for dominance. Frankly, the hours you’ve invested in this game only help to heighten the emotions brought about from this final conflict’s outcome. The disappointment can be overwhelming; that you could come this far and fail at the last second doesn’t seem possible. On the other hand, the sense of satisfaction gained from a narrow victory is one of the most gratifying I’ve yet to experience in a game. Either way, it’s an epic fight.
Suskie's avatar
Last Alert (Turbografx-CD)

Last Alert review (TGCD)

Reviewed on May 01, 2008

Last Alert's 'advanced speech' is in stark contrast to its visuals: the game uses an overhead view (much like the one employed by Guerrilla War) to chronicle the adventures of our favourite Guy, who happens to be a bruising special forces bad ass (of course).
Masters's avatar
Super Paper Mario (Wii)

Super Paper Mario review (WII)

Reviewed on May 01, 2008

The lack of challenge is the game’s biggest issue, but it opens the playing field to people looking for a more casual experience.
siara79's avatar
Just Breed (NES)

Just Breed review (NES)

Reviewed on May 01, 2008

Enemies are numerous – they litter the battlefield, plotting your demise, waiting for the right moment to strike. This predicament leads to one of the hardest decisions any general has to make: whether to ask his troops to sacrifice health or life in order to eliminate an enemy force. Proudly direct a choice few into the line of fire, drawing your elusive enemy into a clever trap. With your foe now in range, he’s easy picking for the rest of your party.
wolfqueen001's avatar
Portal (PC)

Portal review (PC)

Reviewed on April 30, 2008

Portal, the hidden gem nestled within the treasure chest of The Orange Box can now be purchased as a standalone title, allowing a whole new wave of gamers the opportunity to revel in one of the most innovative productions the industry has seen in a long time.
southy787's avatar
Bleach: The Blade of Fate (DS)

Bleach: The Blade of Fate review (DS)

Reviewed on April 30, 2008

The window for importing Bleach: Souten ni Kakeru Unmei has officially closed. It will always be one of the standout fighting games on the DS, given its strong technical execution and popular anime appeal. The fact that it come the 2-D masters at Treasure will also make many nod with knowing optimism. But players in glorious Nippon have moved on to the sequel, thinning the ranks for Wi-Fi multiplayer. Most important, though, the English localization is now upon us, providing outsiders...
woodhouse's avatar
Agatha Christie: And Then There Were None (Wii)

Agatha Christie: And Then There Were None review (WII)

Reviewed on April 29, 2008

Unfortunately, this review begins with content that cannot properly be displayed on some pages on the site (including this one). No excerpt is currently available, but this review still meets the site's quality standards and you are encouraged to read it anyway if you're interested in the title.
terrisus's avatar
Rampage: Total Destruction (GameCube)

Rampage: Total Destruction review (GCN)

Reviewed on April 28, 2008

Rampage Total Destruction combines the heavy doses of the first two games, and brings in a whole new adventure with almost 30 monsters into one package. The first Rampage for the NES, and the N64 World Tour version are enough for a few hours of fun, but the new adventure is the meat of the package. Let me break it down for you.
G_Dub's avatar
Draglade (DS)

Draglade review (DS)

Reviewed on April 28, 2008

As much as Draglade might sound like a cheap energy drink, it’s actually a DS action-RPG that feels like a cross between Pokemon and Megaman Battle Network, with an element of music-and-rhythm thrown in for good measure.
PAJ89's avatar
Bomberman Land (Wii)

Bomberman Land review (WII)

Reviewed on April 27, 2008

Thing is, if you can dig through the gloopy mire of problems that plague Bomberman Land then you can find a decent collection of mini-games to play though. And, if you don’t have the patience, then you can simply fall back on the tried and trusted Bomberman game of old where you try the explode fellows bombers in a claustrophobic room rife with power-ups.
EmP's avatar
1943: The Battle of Midway (NES)

1943: The Battle of Midway review (NES)

Reviewed on April 27, 2008

The game treats you much differently depending on the choices you make and it never coddles you. Souping up your special weapons right away so that you can fire amazing rapid-fire bursts or shell your enemies relentlessly with a barrage of missiles might seem like a winning strategy at first, but it's also an effective way to cheat yourself out of a lengthy life expectancy.
honestgamer's avatar
Fatal Fury: Battle Archives Vol. 2 (PlayStation 2)

Fatal Fury: Battle Archives Vol. 2 review (PS2)

Reviewed on April 26, 2008

It seems unusual to see the high-quality backgrounds swapped out from one game to the next, rather than simply finding them supplemented by a few new ones. Just the fact that things work like that, though, is a point in this compilation's favor. The genuine differences between each entry—including a final boss in the first one that is swapped out by the time the second and third arrive—mean that you really are getting three distinct titles instead of one thrice repeated and barely modified.
honestgamer's avatar
Contact (DS)

Contact review (DS)

Reviewed on April 26, 2008

Contact has drawn strong comparisons to a few other games, but it reminded me most of Secret of Evermore - of that 16-bit Mana substitute's Frankenstein-like attempt to construct an RPG story without the slightest charm or spark of life. Evermore, though, had Jeremy Soule's evocative music and an inspired idea here and there, like the giant chess board with malevolent pieces or a uniquely sad cameo by Cecil of FF4. Contact, by contrast, boasts a development...
Synonymous's avatar
Dream Pinball 3D (Wii)

Dream Pinball 3D review (WII)

Reviewed on April 26, 2008

When you're playing and the ball is moving too quickly, it seems like the camera just isn't ready to follow it appropriately. The developers chose a default perspective where not everything fits all in one screen and thus the view will drift around to follow ball movement. Sometimes the ball knocks against something along the top portion of the table and then plummets straight down so that it's already dropping through a gap and into oblivion before you can even see where the flippers are.
honestgamer's avatar
Stinger (NES)

Stinger review (NES)

Reviewed on April 25, 2008

Part of the problem is that all three horizontal stages feel the exact same, as do the four vertical ones — with the only noticeable differences being the background graphics and the ferocity of the enemy waves. Each level, regardless of viewpoint, has the TwinBee ship moving on a slowly-scrolling screen while one wave after another of flying foes come after it.
overdrive's avatar
Battle of the Bands (Wii)

Battle of the Bands review (WII)

Reviewed on April 25, 2008

That will then send your chosen projectile toward your opponent, who should deflect it. If he doesn't, you score a lot of points and bragging rights. You're also rewarded by the sound of your own band singing. In heated matches, gangsters and hicks might be struggling back and forth to keep the twang in and out of a rousing rendition of “Whoomp (There It Is),” and that's just one of many interesting situations.
honestgamer's avatar
Assassin's Creed (Xbox 360)

Assassin's Creed review (X360)

Reviewed on April 24, 2008

Altaďr’s actions are divided between socially acceptable and socially unacceptable, and you can switch between the two with the right trigger. Unfortunately, Assassin’s Creed is one of those sandbox games where the “cops” (i.e. the guards) want to kill you for every little thing that you do. And since all of Altaďr’s best and most convenient abilities are considered suspicious behavior, expect to attract quite a bit of attention from the local law enforcement. This includes the act of running, which evidently is a sin punishable by death.
Suskie's avatar
Obscure: The Aftermath (PlayStation 2)

Obscure: The Aftermath review (PS2)

Reviewed on April 23, 2008

All the kids are planning to hit up some exclusive frat party, but first — it's time to partake of the new awesome college party drug. Some mysterious new flower's pollen, if inhaled, bestows a really good buzz and some wacky hallucinations. In fact, they're so wacky that Corey and Mei find themselves in a creeped-out locale ripped right out of any number of hellish Silent Hill locations. After enduring a few experiences nightmarish enough to convince just about anyone besides me that drugs are bad, Corey wakes up a bathroom with the hangover to end all hangovers.
overdrive's avatar
SEGA Superstars Tennis (Xbox 360)

SEGA Superstars Tennis review (X360)

Reviewed on April 21, 2008

The idea of everyone's favourite SEGA characters such as Sonic, Ulala, AiAi and Nights in a tennis game is a fantastic idea. Hoping to follow in the footsteps of brilliant tennis series like Mario Tennis and SEGAs own Virtua Tennis, the developers at SUMO have given us Sega Superstars Tennis. Does the game score an ace or does it double fault?
Azumangaman's avatar

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