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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Monster Madness: Grave Danger (PlayStation 3)

Monster Madness: Grave Danger review (PS3)

Reviewed on September 21, 2008

If you want a new-gen Smash TV with corpses other than slightly homosexual-looking guys in body-tight red jumpsuits made from latex, then your choices are already pretty limited. Monster Madness: Grave Danger is pretty much the only way to go, but thatís okay. As long as you donít belong in certain pigeonholes, you could have some fun here.
EmP's avatar
Wild ARMs XF (PSP)

Wild ARMs XF review (PSP)

Reviewed on September 21, 2008

It truely is a fantastic example of the genre, but it's immediately obvious that innovation isn't the reason why. The game's biggest departure from genre conventions is that its play field is divided into hexagons instead of squares. This makes sense given the battle system of the last two traditional Wild Arms games, and adds a small bit of series recognition to the game, but the practical impact is nonexistent. The game feels very familiar immediately. Move a unit, select its action, move on. Simple.
dragoon_of_infinity's avatar
S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Clear Sky (PC)

S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Clear Sky review (PC)

Reviewed on September 20, 2008

There was a point about halfway through the new S.T.A.L.K.E.R. when I realised I was playing a radically different game to the one I started a couple of days previously. The change is a gradual one, but by the time the phenomenal ambition of the early levels has become a mere memory, it's certainly noticeable. There's a conflict of interest at the heart of Clear Sky between radically open warfare and traditional first-person shooting. Neither of these facets achieves its aims perfectly, but there remains a lot to love about GSC Game World's latest creation...
Lewis's avatar
Doom 3 (PC)

Doom 3 review (PC)

Reviewed on September 18, 2008

When a group of artists labour for months or years on some magnificently coded and presented piece of gaming software, I can't help but feel uncomfortable about kicking their hard work Ė but Doom 3 is unfortunately boring and there's not much else I can do to it. I remember being pleased when id software announced they were going to switch their focus back to the single player experience with this title, coming as it did after a string of deathmatch oriented games, but the result is claustrophob...
bloomer's avatar
Battle Circuit (Arcade)

Battle Circuit review (ARC)

Reviewed on September 18, 2008

Capcom has made a lot of beat'em ups during the late 80s and most of the 90s, some of which were street brawlers that involved mayors and ninjas, knights and magicians that fought inside dungeons that possibly included dragons, and a game where you run around in giant robots, tearing stuff up. So, after making a variety of brawlers, how does Capcom attempt to make another one without it feeling like a rehash?
pickhut's avatar
Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 3 FES (PlayStation 2)

Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 3 FES review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 17, 2008

Like the average fan of RPGs, I typically do not look back on my years in high school with fondness. So when Atlus began showing trailers of Persona 3, the most recent spin-off in the ever edgy Shin Megami Tensei series, I was obviously skeptical of the unusual format in which the player equally divides his or her time between school work and dungeon-crawling. I mean, this is the same series that had tried to revive Hitler; how did we go from that to sleeping through Engli...
dagoss's avatar
P.N.03 (GameCube)

P.N.03 review (GCN)

Reviewed on September 14, 2008

Late 2002 was a happy time for Nintendo fans. Capcom's famed Production Studio 4 announced a quintuple threat of games for the floundering GameCube, including a cel-shaded superhero game, a new entry in the Resident Evil franchise, a since-cancelled mythological shooter, an intriguing noir game, and a very stylish looking shooter named Product Number 03, or P.N. 03 for short. Anticipation for the games grew and grew, but when P.N. 03 came out in Japan, not too many pe...
Cornwell's avatar
The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion (Xbox 360)

The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion review (X360)

Reviewed on September 14, 2008

It brings sharply into focus exactly why Oblivionís quick save and save anywhere features are downright vital. Thereís a reason you and you alone are tasked with saving the entire world aside from Patrick Stewart telling you to do so: this reason is because everyone else in the region is a bloody retard.
EmP's avatar
Hacker (Commodore 64)

Hacker review (C64)

Reviewed on September 14, 2008

To understand why Hacker became a cult classic, first it's necessary to know that the actual game is only part of the package. Think back to 1985, when games were already sold in stores, in a way not all that different from today - flashy boxes with cover art, blurbs of advertizing and little screenshots on the back, and a new smelling game and paper manual inside. Hacker, in the meantime, has a non-descript box with very little information on it, and inside, only a Commodore 64 cassette tape. N...
sashanan's avatar
Spore (PC)

Spore review (PC)

Reviewed on September 14, 2008

The premise behind Spore is simple, really. Take a cell and grow it up until you reach space travel. Sounds simple, don't it? That's because it is. Spore is a very railroaded game until you hit the final stage, then it becomes sandbox. There are multiple paths that you can take in your own race to space, but they all lead to the same objectives in the end; which just so happen to be the game's biggest letdown.
BLAH_Or_blah's avatar
Monster Hunter (PlayStation 2)

Monster Hunter review (PS2)

Reviewed on September 14, 2008

Monster Hunter, for me, used to be an obsession. Though that obsession raised me to the upper echelons in the Monster Hunter society. Yes, I was a big shot on a video game, lol@me. I mostly add this to give my credibility some water. This is not some half-baked review you might find at other sites that consist of less than a full day's worth of play and a very ignorant view of what the game is, what it accomplishes, and how the developers designed it for those goals.
BLAH_Or_blah's avatar
Undercover Cops (Arcade)

Undercover Cops review (ARC)

Reviewed on September 13, 2008

In a dimly lit room of political power, town officials plot how to take care of the recent crime outbreak...
drella's avatar
Lock's Quest (DS)

Lock's Quest review (DS)

Reviewed on September 13, 2008

THQ as a company can be summed up in one word: shovelware. All those bad movie tie-in games you see? Thatís THQ. I donít think THQ has ever published a worthwhile game in their entire history as a company. Theyíre attracted to bad games like flies to shit. Then I heard a select few morons saying that THQ had finally published a good game Ė Lockís Quest. Naturally, I downloaded it to see what was up. What I expected was a bad Western shovelware title, and thatís pretty much exactly what I got.
timrod's avatar
EVE Online: The Second Genesis (PC)

EVE Online: The Second Genesis review (PC)

Reviewed on September 12, 2008

Eve Online
BLAH_Or_blah's avatar
Strong Bad's Cool Game for Attractive People Episode 1: Homestar Ruiner (PC)

Strong Bad's Cool Game for Attractive People Episode 1: Homestar Ruiner review (PC)

Reviewed on September 10, 2008

For those who didn't know, Homestar Runner is a long running internet comedy website revolving largely about a guy answering his e-mail. It's most well known for having oddly drawn and animated cartoony characters getting into all kinds of odd misadventures together in a surprisingly mundane world. I didn't know exactly what to expect in a game about this place, but in retrospect this has point-and-click adventure written all over it. And it is pretty fitting, I suppose. The game lends itself well to the genre, what with all the quirk and the word play. Everything's too goofy to make a convincing action game or, well, much of anything else.
dragoon_of_infinity's avatar
Sonic 3D Blast (Genesis)

Sonic 3D Blast review (GEN)

Reviewed on September 10, 2008

You know what was Sonic 3D Blast's problem? It wasn't that it strayed from the side-scrolling, platforming angle in favor of an isometric viewpoint. Its problem is that it doesn't have a save feature. For an action game, it's pretty long. Two hours long, to be exact. This has to do with the fact that most of the Zones (stages) in this game drag on longer than they should. You see, each Act of a Zone contains three segments, and in each segment, you'll have to search for Dr. Robotnik's rob...
pickhut's avatar
Dream Pinball 3D (DS)

Dream Pinball 3D review (DS)

Reviewed on September 09, 2008

The table spans out on the bottom screen, the top sprawled with skulls, magic books and bumpers shaped like medieval castles. For some reason, a few of the bonuses unlock a tweeting bird song, but Iím willing to forgive it. Barely. Itís a very annoying side effect.
EmP's avatar
1701 A.D. Gold Edition (PC)

1701 A.D. Gold Edition review (PC)

Reviewed on September 09, 2008

Chances are you know the game's titular century well enough; the late 1600's and early 1700's serve as the backdrop for just about every pirate movie, game, and comic book known to man. Do pirates factor into 1701? A little, but the game's focus is more on the other, less popularized aspects of the era.
WilltheGreat's avatar
The Sporting News Baseball (SNES)

The Sporting News Baseball review (SNES)

Reviewed on September 08, 2008

I spent so many summer days slugging the hell out of the ball, the cornfield always my sanctuary. Iíd run every top slugger of the time (1993) out there, 100 pitches each, and afterward record their totals in spreadsheets. Iíd be surprised by results, and forced to test them again. Could Greg Vaughn really have more raw power than Danny Tartabull? Was Darryl Strawberry better than Bobby Bonillia? I had to know.
drella's avatar
Earthworm Jim (Genesis)

Earthworm Jim review (GEN)

Reviewed on September 08, 2008

Earthworm Jim thrives on its gaudy humor and wacky experiences. Complex things like plot would be entirely inappropriate here. Players arenít looking for intricate story-telling or in-depth level design. Theyíre looking for kicks, for something more than a little different. And this game delivers.
wolfqueen001's avatar

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