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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Gribbly's Day Out (Commodore 64)

Gribbly's Day Out review (C64)

Reviewed on June 19, 2009

Gamers are strange animals. A game may give us state-of-the-art graphics, an excellent soundtrack, lots of different options and whatever else we may be looking for, and we can still write it off as boring. Another game may look like nothing to the casual observer, but for some reason people fall completely in love with it. In the end, what matters is if a game is fun to play, and it is not always as easy to grasp why it is or why it isn't.
sashanan's avatar
Galaxian (Commodore 64)

Galaxian review (C64)

Reviewed on June 19, 2009

Namco's Galaxian was first released in the arcades in 1979 as a successor to Space Invaders. The Commodore 64 version, which is a remake rather than a direct port, came four years later. The premise is the same as in the original: you pilot a lone spaceship against waves of alien invaders, trying to gun down their formation without getting killed yourself. Galaxian differs from Space Invaders in the sense that enemies leave the formation to make swooping attacks on your craft, carefully at first...
sashanan's avatar
Choplifter (Commodore 64)

Choplifter review (C64)

Reviewed on June 19, 2009

This review takes us back almost twenty years in time, to the first of the two golden years of the Commodore 64: 1982. Many of the most famous Commodore titles are from this year (in which the system was released) and 1983. Some are merely names that may or may no longer be familiar to gamers these days. Others were the beginning of a series that was later continued on other systems. Choplifter is an example of the latter, spawning a second and a third title on various systems including the Supe...
sashanan's avatar
Booga-Boo (Commodore 64)

Booga-Boo review (C64)

Reviewed on June 19, 2009

Few games manage to annoy the player as much as Booga Boo does. Despite the programmer's undoubtedly good intentions, this game is completely devoid of any entertainment value at all, but does manage quite nicely to drive you insane in record time. The concept of the game is to guide a flea who has fallen down a bunch back up to where he started. Walking around is not an option - it's a flea, and therefore we'll be jumping. Using a series of awkward left and right jumps, you must somehow guide h...
sashanan's avatar
Star Wars Rogue Squadron II: Rogue Leader (GameCube)

Star Wars Rogue Squadron II: Rogue Leader review (GCN)

Reviewed on June 18, 2009

Rogue Squadron 2 knows what the Star Wars nerd inside all of us has always wanted. We don't want to protect generic convoys on generic grassy planets like in the first game, we want to blow up the damn Death Star. The first level lets us do just that, and the photorealistic graphics make it look like a scene out of the movie. Squadrons of plucky rebels in their X-Wing fighters wiping out TIE Fighters while green turret fire sprays in the background; speeding down the country-long trench while Da...
Cornwell's avatar
Prototype (PlayStation 3)

Prototype review (PS3)

Reviewed on June 18, 2009

Every memorable game—be it good or bad—has at lease one defining moment. Moments that leave you in disgust, wondering why you shelled out your hard-earned money for such a travesty. Or, moments that inspire awe, that captivate you and reaffirm your decision to invest in the game.
True's avatar
Soul Blazer (SNES)

Soul Blazer review (SNES)

Reviewed on June 18, 2009

Soul Blazer’s intro-story is a veritable list of things evil despots should watch out for. You shouldn’t build machines to summon demons. You shouldn’t barter with said demons, especially if their name is something like “Deathtoll.” And if you do happen to make a deal where you trade him lives in exchange for gold, at least have the presence of mind to stop before your entire kingdom is empty of happy tax payers. Oh, and check the contract to make sure you get to keep your soul in the...
zippdementia's avatar
Class of Heroes (PSP)

Class of Heroes review (PSP)

Reviewed on June 17, 2009

Class of Heroes is huge. I remember when my Celestian Valkyrie — I pervishly call her my angel — hit level seven. To advance to the next level, she needed 10,500 additional experience. Over ten thousand experience to reach level eight. That's a lot, especially considering I was already 15 hours into the adventure, but the game promised to continue for many, many hours.
zigfried's avatar
Knights in the Nightmare (DS)

Knights in the Nightmare review (DS)

Reviewed on June 17, 2009

King Wilmgard is dead. The cause was conspiracy, and his castle was rotten with it. It’s kind of ironic, in a way; the most beneficent and beloved ruler in centuries, undone by the corrupt ambitions of his most trusted peers. But the tragedy didn’t just end with him. The country’s demise was almost as brutal and merciless as that of its king. The Knights of St. Celestina - along with anyone else loyal to their murdered leader - have been exterminated, right down to the last squire. They were sla...
disco's avatar
Naruto Shippuden: Ninja Council 4 (DS)

Naruto Shippuden: Ninja Council 4 review (DS)

Reviewed on June 16, 2009

Ninja Council 4 is a lean, focused story dressed in a new wardrobe. Unfortunately, the game has become too thin. Wi-fi multiplayer, prominent in the original Japanese version, has been dropped from the North American release. Fans forced to approach the game as a purely single-player experience will find some of its hottest new assets locked away.
woodhouse's avatar
I Love Beauty: Hollywood Makeover (DS)

I Love Beauty: Hollywood Makeover review (DS)

Reviewed on June 16, 2009

Beauty is really about style. I Love Beauty: Hollywood Makeover is about the drudgery of applying makeup.
woodhouse's avatar
God Hand (PlayStation 2)

God Hand review (PS2)

Reviewed on June 15, 2009

Whether you're a skilled gamer or just someone looking for a good time (call me), God Hand doesn't discriminate; it will kick your ass the moment you step into its playground. Since this is a 3D beat 'em up title, you probably think I'm over-exaggerating, believing you can make it through this game by only mashing buttons. If you even dare to do that here, God Hand will set you straight, sending you to the continue screen in mere seconds. God Hand doesn't play it your way, y...
pickhut's avatar
The Lion King (Genesis)

The Lion King review (GEN)

Reviewed on June 14, 2009

It’s not every day we see a movie-licensed game that’s actually any good. Traditionally, they’re manifests of cash-in mediocrity when developers are contracted to (quickly) produce a title on every console available and hope it will sell. Generally they often do. Brand recognition prevails over genuine quality as these games chart highly, yet do well to even achieve a 6/10 score. The situation has improved somewhat through the ages, but the likes of Goldeneye and certain Star Wars ...
bigcj34's avatar
Kukulcan (Apple II)

Kukulcan review (APP2)

Reviewed on June 14, 2009

Kukulcan (1984) is an educational graphic adventure game set in 1519. The player takes the role of an Aztec scribe summoned by Montezuma to seek knowledge of the Feathered Serpent, in hopes that this knowledge may stave off the arrival of evils portended by recent omens. The Aztecs were right to have been worried around this time; the Spanish conquistador Hernando Cortez was soon to invade Tenochtitlan (the future site of Mexico City), arrest Montezuma and bring an end to the Aztec Empire. Thus ...
bloomer's avatar
Osomatsu-kun: Hachamecha Gekijou (Genesis)

Osomatsu-kun: Hachamecha Gekijou review (GEN)

Reviewed on June 14, 2009

Osomatsu-kun: Hachamecha Gekijou is a war of attrition; progression in the game is dependant on what simply breaks first. The game’s surreal presentation or your will to continue onward.
EmP's avatar
Cross Edge (PlayStation 3)

Cross Edge review (PS3)

Reviewed on June 14, 2009

Because of the haphazard manner in which information is presented, genre-standard processes such as item crafting, synthesis, skill point allotment, shopping, party formation and so forth all require that you dive through two or three screens. Even then, it can be difficult if you've accomplished what you meant to accomplish. Whether you're trying to guess at who can equip an item or merely trying to assign characters to your current rotation, prepare for frustration. There's no escaping the nightmare.
honestgamer's avatar
Kouryuu Densetsu Villgust Gaiden (NES)

Kouryuu Densetsu Villgust Gaiden review (NES)

Reviewed on June 13, 2009

Shortly after its release, Kouryuu Densetsu Villgust Gaiden was adapted into an animated short-film loosely based around the game itself. Yet, despite hosting several characters not present in the game, its lack of connection with much of anything in the game save the “evil deity” and the “goddess”, and its over-all (expected) shortness, this OVA made a lot more sense than the actual game itself.
wolfqueen001's avatar
Sheep (Game Boy Advance)

Sheep review (GBA)

Reviewed on June 13, 2009

You're a sheepdog! Har!
turducken's avatar
Trinity (Apple II)

Trinity review (APP2)

Reviewed on June 13, 2009

Infocom's text adventures were usually better at being funny than serious. For example, Zork I and II were better games than Zork III. But Trinity, based on your efforts to prevent the first atom bomb from exploding, works, and staggeringly well. It places you, as a tourist, in Kensington Gardens, with the first missile of World War III about to land. You find a deformed lady, take an interesting transport to the shore, and enter a white door you'll see again later, to wind up in a place ...
aschultz's avatar
Snake Byte (Apple II)

Snake Byte review (APP2)

Reviewed on June 12, 2009

Snake Byte was a simple, high-resolution graphical update to White Lightning, one of the first games made for the Apple, in BASIC and low resolution graphics. I knew it first as Hustler, from the TRS-80 at our school, and then after the librarians got more diligent deleting games, Snake Byte and its wonderful graphics left me captivated. It's a fairly simple game: you're a snake, chasing apples on a board around barriers. The more you eat, the longer the snake goes. C...
aschultz's avatar

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