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Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Defense Grid: The Awakening (PC)

Defense Grid: The Awakening review (PC)

Reviewed on January 04, 2012

Missions include special objectives that switch things up. Your options change depending on the scenario. In one case, you might be able to try a familiar stage with 99 waves instead of the usual 25 or 30. Elsewhere, you might be able to start with 20,000 resources but defeated enemies wonít drop any additional resources.
honestgamer's avatar
Super Thunder Blade (Genesis)

Super Thunder Blade review (GEN)

Reviewed on January 02, 2012

Entertainment at its finest.
pickhut's avatar
Sonic CD (PlayStation 3)

Sonic CD review (PS3)

Reviewed on December 31, 2011

Gameplay is another way in which Sonic CD doesn't meet the standard set by its more vanilla Genesis counterparts, though it doesn't fall nearly as short as it could have. Levels always have enough unique gimmicks to prevent them from blurring together in your memory. Each level effectively has four versions. By running past special posts, Sonic can travel through time and his actions in the past can change the future. This means that every level has a present version, past version, good future version, and bad future version (the good future is basically the bad future with fewer enemies). It's an interesting mechanic that can be used to keep things fresh for multiple playthroughs.
Roto13's avatar
Cruise Missile (Atari 2600)

Cruise Missile review (A2600)

Reviewed on December 31, 2011

This is what Einstein was talking about.
JoeTheDestroyer's avatar
Unreal (PC)

Unreal review (PC)

Reviewed on December 30, 2011

As a first-person shooter, itís incredibly competent. Quake 2 might have had the tempo, and Half-Life the suspenseful pacing, but Unreal had the variety and the challenge. Its weapons drew criticism for feeling weak and weedy against the Skaarj oppressors, and itís a fair comment. They often do. But Iím sure thatís partly because the buggers are so tough, right from the start.
Lewis's avatar
Quake (PC)

Quake review (PC)

Reviewed on December 30, 2011

Quake still absolutely stands up today. Its visuals might be pixellated, the environments often rather monochrome, as became the running gag. Yet the design of the world is tremendous, the levels balanced, structured and elegantly paced. The variety on display, despite the vast swathes of brown, dwarfs that of most modern games as well.
Lewis's avatar
Quake II (PC)

Quake II review (PC)

Reviewed on December 30, 2011

Enemies dart and dodge, firing sprays of bullets in the final seconds of their lives, trying everything they can to bring you down, even if it means losing their own lives in the process. The range of enemies on display is perhaps the only area in which Quake II rivals the variety of its predecessor, too.
Lewis's avatar
Planescape: Torment (PC)

Planescape: Torment review (PC)

Reviewed on December 30, 2011

Planescapeís fiction is perfect: it takes two intrinsic human fears, turns one on its head, and allows the other so much room to breathe. In Planescape, you play as a man who has already lost his entire memory, including that of his own identity, yet he can never escape this dreadful state.
Lewis's avatar
Omikron: The Nomad Soul (PC)

Omikron: The Nomad Soul review (PC)

Reviewed on December 30, 2011

In The Nomad Soul, you donít play as any of the main characters. Instead, you play as all of them. Sort of. In fact, you play as a person playing a computer game, in which the player plays as a soul who can transfer between different bodies. Yes. And itís all absolutely merrily acknowledged by the game. None of this is real, it tells you. Itís just a game.
Lewis's avatar
Akane the Kunoichi (Xbox 360)

Akane the Kunoichi review (X360)

Reviewed on December 29, 2011

It all boils down to your ability to make use of very basic commands like jumping and attacking. Time your presses carefully and rule the day, but if you don't you can't blame unresponsive controls or faulty collision detection. If you think about it, it's so simple. Just hit two different buttons at the right times and you'll survive. It may be that simple, but it sure as hell isn't that easy.
JoeTheDestroyer's avatar
Fallout: New Vegas (PC)

Fallout: New Vegas review (PC)

Reviewed on December 29, 2011

Fans of the Fallout series should not even read this, since they already have the Collector' s edition of the game, signed by the development team itself, with a complimentary brahmin figure sagely looking at them.
darketernal's avatar
The Last Express (PC)

The Last Express review (PC)

Reviewed on December 28, 2011

This review is of the GOG.com version of last express from december 2011, and it reflects any bugs/bugfixes/optimizations/whatever associated with that version.
Typodragon's avatar
TaleSpin (NES)

TaleSpin review (NES)

Reviewed on December 27, 2011

In the first level, enemy planes try to ram you as you fly over large expanses of water dotted with oil platforms. Halfway through, you confront the infamous air pirate Don Karnage, who is hell-bent on ruining your day. You can't beat him yet, so you must evade his shots while pressing forward until he gives up.
wolfqueen001's avatar
Back to the Future: The Game (PlayStation 3)

Back to the Future: The Game review (PS3)

Reviewed on December 26, 2011

Back to the Future: The Game basically tries to be a fourth Back to the Future movie, and it tries hard. Everything about this game is a reference to the movies. Some of the music from the movies is used in the soundtrack, there are plenty of references to all three films scattered around the game world, and even the box art follows the template used by the posters for all three films. Christopher Lloyd reassumes the role of Doc Brown, and Marty McFly is played by a new actor (named A.J. LaCascio) who does an amazing job. Seriously, he sounds so much like a young Michael J. Fox, itís kind of eerie, especially in Episode 5 when Fox himself makes a cameo as one of Martyís ancestors and the two characters have a conversation.
Roto13's avatar
Assassin's Creed (PlayStation 3)

Assassin's Creed review (PS3)

Reviewed on December 24, 2011

It's unfortunate that you have to chew through the boredom to get to the meaty parts. Assassin's Creed has very about it that's exciting or worthwhile. What few scenes that are are sandwiched between tedious activities and repetition. Without these activities, the game is too short; with them, the thrill is so intermittent that it's difficult to stay excited even when you get to the meaty parts.
JoeTheDestroyer's avatar
Comic Jumper (Xbox 360)

Comic Jumper review (X360)

Reviewed on December 22, 2011

Each stage is preceded by banter between Captain Smiley, Star (the character on his chest) and assorted other guests that include a wad of paper masquerading as a hero and a tattooed concubine who wears lovely fur garments. The dialog in this game is genuinely funny most of the time, and voiced to perfection. A few of the jokes do seem the slightest bit forced, but even the worst of the humor is so bad it's good.
honestgamer's avatar
Tropico 3 (Xbox 360)

Tropico 3 review (X360)

Reviewed on December 22, 2011

Sometimes, the amount of control that you have over your island is overwhelming. Tropico 3 was released first as a PC game, where sorting all of the available options and information must have felt quite natural, but the Xbox 360 controller has fewer buttons at its disposal. Face buttons bring up menus, which you can then further navigate using the bumper buttons.
honestgamer's avatar
Super Scribblenauts (DS)

Super Scribblenauts review (DS)

Reviewed on December 22, 2011

If a puzzle gives you too much trouble, the game has a hint system in place. You can pay virtual currency to unlock new tips that supply varying degrees of assistance. Sometimes, the best hints will flat out give you the answer, which may disappoint some. It's not a big deal, though, because most stages can be repeated. The only way to get a gold crown for such stages is to play through it three consecutive times while using different phrases on every attempt.
honestgamer's avatar
Sports Champions (PlayStation 3)

Sports Champions review (PS3)

Reviewed on December 22, 2011

Sports Champions features six games: disc golf, beach volleyball, archery, table tennis, gladiator duel and bocce. Each included option offers depth and precision. You'll have to work harder to get everything out of these offerings than you would if you were playing Wii Sports, but each one is more substantial than Nintendo's entire package. None of the activities are particularly imposing, either.
honestgamer's avatar
Scott Pilgrim vs. The World (Xbox 360)

Scott Pilgrim vs. The World review (X360)

Reviewed on December 22, 2011

Perhaps it shouldn't come as a surprise, then, that the levels in Scott Pilgrim vs. The World often feel like they were borrowed from classic fare such as Final Fight, Double Dragon and River City Ransom. There is a gratuitous number of cracked sidewalks, fire hydrants that spray water when you punch them, trash cans, park benches and bus stops. The attention to detail here is delightful.
honestgamer's avatar

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