Patreon button  Steam curated reviews  Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | AND | IOS | PC | PS4 | NS | VITA | WIIU | XB1 | All

Review Archives (All Reviews)

You are currently looking through all reviews for games that are available on every platform the site currently covers. Below, you will find reviews written by all eligible authors and sorted according to date of submission, with the newest content displaying first. As many as 20 results will display per page. If you would like to try a search with different parameters, specify them below and submit a new search.

Available Reviews
Epic Dungeon (Xbox 360)

Epic Dungeon review (X360)

Reviewed on March 31, 2011

Epic Dungeon does itself credit by showcasing the best elements from years of Rogue-liking, but then manages to stand out of the crowd by daring to be different. Successful runs can last a matter of hours, premature ones a matter of seconds, but there’s always reason to come back and try again.
EmP's avatar
Cybernator (SNES)

Cybernator review (SNES)

Reviewed on March 31, 2011

The drama! The excitement! The space opera! The exact opposite of Target Earth!
pickhut's avatar
Ufouria (NES)

Ufouria review (NES)

Reviewed on March 31, 2011

Think of it as Mario meets Metroid. So... Marioid? Metrio? The world is made of various platforming situations, and it's up to you to use your skills, items and other recruitable characters to conquer them and find a way out of this twisted wonderland.
JoeTheDestroyer's avatar
Pilotwings Resort (3DS)

Pilotwings Resort review (3DS)

Reviewed on March 31, 2011

There are more than 40 missions, the game’s packaging cheerfully notes, but those missions typically can be completed within 2 or 3 minutes each. A higher score and a better star rating are your only reason to return to a mission once you satisfy its conditions, and once you unlock the next tier of missions, you might not wish to revisit the early challenges at all.
honestgamer's avatar
Super Mario Bros. (NES)

Super Mario Bros. review (NES)

Reviewed on March 30, 2011

You’ll find that every plat-former made since then has copied the formula of Super Mario Bros. to some extent. Characters collect items, find new ways to defeat enemies, and explore “levels’ of unique environments.
japanaman's avatar
Boxing (Atari 2600)

Boxing review (A2600)

Reviewed on March 30, 2011

Boxing by Activision, is one of the first boxing video games ever created (if not the first) for the home video game console. The game play is simple, yet enjoyable. You play as a Boxer 1 (AKA White Lightning) who challenges Boxer 2 (AKA Black N’ Decker) to a friendly exhibition match.
japanaman's avatar
Homefront (Xbox 360)

Homefront review (X360)

Reviewed on March 30, 2011

Before we even have a gun in our hands, Kaos sends us through a Modern Warfare-esque “sit in a vehicle and watch stuff happen” introductory sequence, during which we’re shown a young couple being lined up on a busy street and shot while their crying toddler watches. By the second level, we see the corpses of American civilians being dumped by bulldozers into mass graves. Jeez. Slow burn much, Homefront?
Suskie's avatar
WWF War Zone (Nintendo 64)

WWF War Zone review (N64)

Reviewed on March 28, 2011

The World Wrestling Federation was undergoing a major facelift as the late 1990's came around. Ridding itself of the stale, 'family friendly' legacy from the decade before, it stood up to growing competition from both WCW and ECW and began offering a far more cut-throat, near-the-knuckle product. The Federation's last video game release, In Your House in 1996, couldn't have been further removed from this. It was time for developer Acclaim to redeem itself...
Louisutton's avatar
Dreamcast Collection (Xbox 360)

Dreamcast Collection review (X360)

Reviewed on March 28, 2011

Sega had a legacy here to uphold. You know how hardcore gamers love to laud accolades on lesser known, dead systems and celebrate their obscure appeal? Well Dreamcast was one of those systems. Hell, Dreamcast might have been the system – only the near-mythical Turbo Duo vies with it for that title.
Masters's avatar
Golden Sun: Dark Dawn (DS)

Golden Sun: Dark Dawn review (DS)

Reviewed on March 28, 2011

They then thrust them into a meek storyline that does nothing to supplement the Golden Sun epic or answer the questions made at the end of The Lost Age, only gives you random, useless insights to the after-effects of Issac and his group’s end goal. Most of these are meaningless—what alchemy did to the land, how vibrant the earth has become—or long-winded recaps about what happened in the first two games.
True's avatar
Target Earth (Genesis)

Target Earth review (GEN)

Reviewed on March 27, 2011

Whenever you think you understand how Target Earth plays, it always seem to do something to slap your ass back to the title screen.
pickhut's avatar
Dead Space 2 (PC)

Dead Space 2 review (PC)

Reviewed on March 26, 2011

All in all, Dead Space 2 manages to improve on the original whilst retaining a great sense of atmospheric suspense.
Zpardi's avatar
Myst (PC)

Myst review (PC)

Reviewed on March 25, 2011

If you bought a computer between about 1993 and 1996, you'll have got a free computer game with it. Perhaps your mum will have played it, sitting in front of the PC for hours on end, trying to figure out solutions to the game's many puzzles as she wandered around the pretty environments. Myst quickly became one of the most popular games in the world, mainly because you couldn't bloody avoid the thing.
Lewis's avatar
Phantom Brave: The Hermuda Triangle (PSP)

Phantom Brave: The Hermuda Triangle review (PSP)

Reviewed on March 25, 2011

This is an interesting try at making the game a portable smash, but in the end it falls a little short of the mark.
MolotovCupcake's avatar
Prinny 2: Dawn of Operation Panties, Dood! (PSP)

Prinny 2: Dawn of Operation Panties, Dood! review (PSP)

Reviewed on March 25, 2011

Prinny 2: Dawn of Operation Panties, Dood! is a side-scrolling throwback that classic gamers should definitely enjoy.
MolotovCupcake's avatar
Assassin's Creed (Xbox 360)

Assassin's Creed review (X360)

Reviewed on March 24, 2011

Stealth is not important as you’d think. With a name like Assassin’s Creed, wouldn’t you expect the gameplay to revolve around sneaking around and killing your targets and getting out undetected? Of course you would! The brotherhood makes a big deal about not drawing attention, but you’ll find its borderline impossible NOT to draw attention. Most of the assassinations take place in crowded, guarded areas, full of frustrating gameplay mechanics like twitchy guards and troublemakers.
Mega5010's avatar
Lufia: The Legend Returns (Game Boy Color)

Lufia: The Legend Returns review (GBC)

Reviewed on March 24, 2011

Anyhow, not only is the Ancient Cave back in this game, but with twice the number of floors (because, you know, measly 100-floor dungeons are for wimps) AND every single dungeon in the game takes its cue from this place. Yes, they all are multi-floor extravaganzas where everything seems randomly created. This makes things boring. You have no puzzles (unless you consider "striking things on walls to see if that opens up a corridor" to be one) or anything to detract from the tedium. All you do is walk through each floor, avoiding traps, killing monsters and collecting treasures...and then do the same on the next floor and the next until you've completed the dungeon. Then you go to the next town, find out about the next dungeon and do the same there.
overdrive's avatar
Dragon Age 2 (Xbox 360)

Dragon Age 2 review (X360)

Reviewed on March 24, 2011

I guess people liked the origin stories in the first game so much that BioWare went ahead and made the sequel one giant origin story that cuts short just before it actually goes anywhere. It’s as if someone made a Batman movie that ended with Bruce Wayne putting on his costume for the first time.
Suskie's avatar
Epic Dungeon (Xbox 360)

Epic Dungeon review (X360)

Reviewed on March 24, 2011

My first steps into Epic Dungeon are chronicled by the myriad rat and bat bites pervading my berserker's skin and bones. The only option left for me was to swing my sword in a fit of rage and watch the enemies explode into 8-bit gore. More bats and rats swarmed me with mouths biting, claws raking, flees jumping off and getting under my armor.
JoeTheDestroyer's avatar
Thunder Force VI (PlayStation 2)

Thunder Force VI review (PS2)

Reviewed on March 22, 2011

So, the question for all Thunder Force fans concerns the game's difficulty, something that every shoot-them-up masochist thrives on. Will you bleed out of your eye-balls, curled into nothing more but a pathetic lump of flesh in the corner, knowing that you'll never, ever beat that damn boss on Level 3?
darketernal's avatar

Additional Results (20 per page)

[001] [002] [003] [004] [005] [006] [007] [008] [009] [010] [011] [012] [013] [014] [015] [016] [017] [018] [019] [020] [021] [022] [023] [024] [025] [026] [027] [028] [029] [030] [031] [032] [033] [034] [035] [036] [037] [038] [039] [040] [041] [042] [043] [044] [045] [046] [047] [048] [049] [050] [051] [052] [053] [054] [055] [056] [057] [058] [059] [060] [061] [062] [063] [064] [065] [066] [067] [068] [069] [070] [071] [072] [073] [074] [075] [076] [077] [078] [079] [080] [081] [082] [083] [084] [085] [086] [087] [088] [089] [090] [091] [092] [093] [094] [095] [096] [097] [098] [099] [100] [101] [102] [103] [104] [105] [106] [107] [108] [109] [110] [111] [112] [113] [114] [115] [116] [117] [118] [119] [120] [121] [122] [123] [124] [125] [126] [127] [128] [129] [130] [131] [132] [133] [134] [135] [136] [137] [138] [139] [140] [141] [142] [143] [144] [145] [146] [147] [148] [149] [150] [151] [152] [153] [154] [155] [156] [157] [158] [159] [160] [161] [162] [163] [164] [165] [166] [167] [168] [169] [170] [171] [172] [173] [174] [175] [176] [177] [178] [179] [180] [181] [182] [183] [184] [185] [186] [187] [188] [189] [190] [191] [192] [193] [194] [195] [196] [197] [198] [199] [200] [201] [202] [203] [204] [205] [206] [207] [208] [209] [210] [211] [212] [213] [214] [215] [216] [217] [218] [219] [220] [221] [222] [223] [224] [225] [226] [227] [228] [229] [230] [231] [232] [233] [234] [235] [236] [237] [238] [239] [240] [241] [242] [243] [244] [245] [246] [247] [248] [249] [250] [251] [252] [253] [254] [255] [256] [257] [258] [259] [260] [261] [262] [263] [264] [265] [266] [267] [268] [269] [270] [271] [272] [273] [274] [275] [276] [277] [278] [279] [280] [281] [282] [283] [284] [285] [286] [287] [288] [289] [290] [291] [292] [293] [294] [295] [296] [297] [298] [299] [300] [301] [302] [303] [304] [305] [306] [307] [308] [309] [310] [311] [312] [313] [314] [315] [316] [317] [318] [319] [320] [321] [322] [323] [324] [325] [326] [327] [328] [329] [330] [331] [332] [333] [334] [335] [336] [337] [338] [339] [340] [341] [342] [343] [344] [345] [346] [347] [348] [349] [350] [351] [352] [353] [354] [355] [356] [357] [358] [359] [360] [361] [362] [363] [364] [365] [366] [367] [368] [369] [370] [371] [372] [373] [374] [375] [376] [377] [378] [379] [380] [381] [382] [383] [384] [385] [386] [387] [388] [389] [390] [391] [392] [393] [394] [395] [396] [397] [398] [399] [400] [401] [402] [403] [404] [405] [406] [407] [408] [409] [410] [411] [412] [413] [414] [415] [416] [417] [418] [419] [420] [421] [422] [423] [424] [425] [426] [427] [428] [429] [430] [431] [432] [433] [434] [435] [436] [437] [438] [439] [440] [441] [442] [443] [444] [445] [446] [447] [448] [449] [450] [451] [452] [453] [454] [455] [456] [457] [458] [459] [460] [461] [462] [463] [464] [465] [466] [467] [468] [469] [470] [471] [472] [473] [474] [475] [476] [477] [478]

Policies/Ethics | Contact | Advertise | Sponsor Guide | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2017 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.