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draqq_zyxx The meaning of life is to be aware.
The breath of life is to remember.
-Self

Title: Why Addiction Is The Wrong Word
Posted: June 25, 2007 (10:33 PM)

(Let's keep this short and sweet.)

PASSION. Somehow, this word is abandoned for the more fearful word: ADDICTION. Could it possibly be that when someone sacrifices much of their livelihood towards the pursuit of success in video games, it is not because of addiction, but because they are passionate about it? You know, like they would a sport - which is a GAME, I might add. Poker, blackjack, paintball, deer hunting, mixed martial arts. Last time I checked, sacrificing most of your livelihood, even for something that involves gambling or violence, can also be called dedication and heart.

Video game addiction is actually a myth constructed by the media. There's nothing inherently addictive about gameplay, and much of the media, politicians, and psychiatrists are trying to relate video games to drugs. Nearly all game studies practioners agree that game addiction does not exist, a mere fabrication geared towards generating alarmist reactions. I, for one, am only alarmed by the dismissal of passion, the place where all dreams are found.

Addendum: But let me cool my horses a bit. The operative word here is 'excessive' and/or 'addiction'. That video games just happen to be the vehicle for which the addiction or excessiveness arises, does not mean that video games are at fault. I refuse to believe there is something special about video games that make it any more addictive than anything else that someone wants to be successful in. Striving for success will always lead some to the extreme. Video game addiction really should be addiction in its most general form and should be treated in that general form, without any special need to focus on the "video game" in front of it.

[reply]

honestgamerUser: honestgamer
Title:
Posted: June 25, 2007 (10:42 PM)
I'll keep my response short, too: well said!
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GenjUser: Genj
Title:
Posted: June 25, 2007 (10:51 PM)
I'd have an easier time agreeing if not for the existence of MMORPGs and the great lengths aficionados go to and the huge sacrifices some take to be successful. I mean, when you read about people putting their family in debt because they keep spending money on upgrades in Korean RPGs, passion isn't the word for that. That shit just ain't healthy.

Yes, people can have passion for gambling, but when the begin selling their furniture to get back in the game, then they have an addiction. It's true many of us throw around the old "this game is addictive" a lot, but surely it isn't impossible for some people to develop an addiction to a video game.
[reply]

draqq_zyxxUser: draqq_zyxx
Title:
Posted: June 25, 2007 (11:02 PM)
Well, the operative word here is 'excessive' and/or 'addiction'. That video games just happen to be the vehicle for which the addiction or excessiveness arises, does not mean that video games are at fault. I refuse to believe there is something special about video games that make it any more addictive than anything else that someone wants to be successful in. Striving for success will always lead some to the extreme. Video game addiction really should be addiction in its most general form and should be treated in that general form, without any need to focus on the "video game" in front of it.
[reply]

honestgamerUser: honestgamer
Title:
Posted: June 26, 2007 (12:49 AM)
The problem with game addiction is that if video games are addictive (in a medical sense), then so is anything else you do for entertainment or out of necessity. You don't see people looking to classify those other things as a cause for addiction, and you certainly don't see them trying to rank it alongside alcohol.

For example, some people really love listening to music. They'll buy a bunch of CDs. They'll spend more money than they should on collector's editions, signed editions, first editions, rarities... whatever. Then they'll spend all their time listening to it. They won't leave home without it. That's addiction as much as it's addiction if some guy won't leave his basement because he can't take Everquest with him.

This classification is obviously frivolous, but it's a 'back door.' If they can get games classified as a dangerous addiction similar to alchohol, then these groups can prevent children--and possibly anyone--from playing and manufacturing them. Imagine if they could have gotten drums illegalized back in the 60s when they didn't like rock music. That's sort of what they're trying to do here.
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