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Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III: Radical Rescue (Game Boy) artwork

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III: Radical Rescue (Game Boy) review


"Reader, “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III: Radical Rescue” is indeed radical, and it has rescuing of the highest degree. It's an adventure game, and it puts lesser peers like “Super Hemorrhoid” and “Sellout 3” to shame. It is absolutely fun to play, rewarding to explore, and brutal in its challenges. Most of all, it washed away the awful taste of “Back from the Sewers”. "



Reader, “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III: Radical Rescue” is indeed radical, and it has rescuing of the highest degree. It's an adventure game, and it puts lesser peers like “Super Hemorrhoid” and “Sellout 3” to shame. It is absolutely fun to play, rewarding to explore, and brutal in its challenges. Most of all, it washed away the awful taste of “Back from the Sewers”.

The premise is Michelangelo’s on his own, after Splinter and the other three Ninja Turtles got captured like idiots. The game dumps you outside a seemingly abandoned mine and, fuck you, you’re left on your own to sort things out. Mikey can jump, punch, jump kick, and hover using his ‘chucks. He can also throw ninja stars while climbing ladders, which is pretty darned handy.

The general flow of the game is you explore the various chambers of this industrial/mining complex, find and defeat one of Shredder’s bosses, take a key from them, rescue a buddy, find a key card, and move on to the next section. Each Turtle you rescue has an indispensable ability that will take you further into the enemy’s inner sanctum, until you get so deep you find Cyber Shredder breathing down your neck.

It’s typical genre stuff, but it’s also very well done. The different maps feel expansive, but not so much that you end up wandering in circles instead of having fun. Curiosity propels the game, and it is also rewarded adequately with pizzas and life bar power-ups. The usual Ninja Turtles action punctuates the exploration, with all manner of robots and mutants waiting to be pounded. Each area has enough enemies and traps to keep getting from one point to another exciting.

The bosses are as brutal as any I’ve ever encountered, but there’s method beneath the sadism. If the exploration exercises our curiosity, the bosses test our reflexes and our ability to observe and learn. There’s a good balance between the adventure and action elements, and amidst the brutality “Rescue” can be a tad forgiving. Many boss rooms aren’t located too far from pizza items, which can completely re-fill your health and be carried as inventory for later use. These pick-ups even respawn if you exit and re-enter the area, so it’s not like the game designers are oblivious to what they’re putting us through.

For the particularly wimpy, there’s even a superfluous password system. But use those passwords at the risk of robbing “Radical Rescue” of its power. If all you want is to “beat” the game, then you’ll find it disappointingly bare. No--this is a game that’s meant to be played in a single sitting, like any of the other “Ninja Turtle” adventures. The continues are meant to run out. We are meant to start over. And we are meant to have fun every time.

Rating: 10/10

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Community review by joseph_valencia (June 05, 2009)

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