Ads are gone. We're using Patreon to raise funds so we can grow. Please pledge support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All
Disney/Pixar Ratatouille (Wii) artwork

Disney/Pixar Ratatouille (Wii) review


"It also happens to be a title that was clearly developed with the PlayStation 2 in mind. The game works like a charm on the system, and there are times when the Wii version feels clunky by comparison. Fortunately for the Wii, the inverse is sometimes true. For example, there are many places where Remy will run along a series of wires, or jump across a series of poles suspended high in the air. With the Wii Remote and Nunchuk, it’s easy to pull off such daring moves."



Not long after the Pixar announced “Ratatouille,” THQ responded with word that it was producing a game that would arrive alongside the movie. It was slated to arrive on nearly every console in existence, and now it has. With the Wii being such a new system, I was curious to see how it would handle the game compared to the PlayStation 2. After playing both at length, I have my answer. It turns out that neither is really better than the other. They both have strengths and weaknesses, but at the end of the day, you’re safe either way.

On both systems, Ratatouille is a three-dimensional platformer, similar in style to something like the Sly Cooper games. You control a charismatic rat named Remy as he jumps, climbs and scurries his way through the sewers beneath Paris, then across stovetops in its finest kitchen. Along the way, you’ll have to avoid detection by humans and animals as much as possible or run from them when you have no choice. There are tons of stars to collect and bonus stages that extend the experience by several hours, but the main portion of the game can be completed in a long afternoon.

In spite of the main attraction’s brevity, Ratatouille is a great game. It’s not particularly revolutionary, but the elements are pieced together nicely. If you proceed in the manner intended, you’ll constantly be doing something new, whether that’s scavenging for a given area’s hundred stars, or sliding down a sewer canal at breakneck speeds, or playing a cooking mini-game or something else entirely. The developers knew better than to make the game one long series of platforming sequences, and they knew enough to break up the collecting portions with lots of other styles of play. In fact, the more tedious elements are completely optional. As far as adventure games go, Ratatouille is a well-oiled machine.

It also happens to be a title that was clearly developed with the PlayStation 2 in mind. The game works like a charm on the system, and there are times when the Wii version feels clunky by comparison. Fortunately for the Wii, the inverse is sometimes true. For example, there are many places where Remy will run along a series of wires, or jump across a series of poles suspended high in the air. With the Wii Remote and Nunchuk, it’s easy to pull off such daring moves. Hopping all over the place feels natural. On the PlayStation 2, such maneuvers are more cumbersome and you have to concentrate harder to succeed.

On the other hand, combat is less natural on the Wii. You have to whirl the Wii Remote around to simulate a swing, at which point Remy will attack. This takes a little bit longer and feels like wasted energy, but it does work and you shouldn’t lose much or any life throughout the game’s duration because of it. After all, Ratatouille is more about evasion than it is direct confrontation.

Outside of combat, Remy does seem to control better with the Wii Remote. The same cannot be said about the camera. When you’re running along a ledge and working your way up through an area with little on your mind, the camera moves like a dream. You hold the ‘C’ button on the Nunchuk portion of your controller, then use the Wii Remote to slide around for a better view. However, in tight quarters it seems like a bit more of a struggle to get your bearings than it was on Sony’s console. There are times when you can’t really get a clear perspective no matter how hard you try, when on the PlayStation 2 you could.

That’s probably the best example of a situation where you might wish you were playing the PlayStation 2 version. Almost everywhere else, Sony and Nintendo’s consoles play the host with equal style. The only other difference of note is the mini-game selection, which has expanded on the Wii. There are new controls, too.

As an example, one mini-game asks you to select the ingredients for a recipe. The food you’re supposed to use is listed in the upper right corner, while the main portion of the screen is covered with different cuisine options. On the PlayStation 2, as the options are presented, you would press one button to approve of the choice and another to decline. That felt pretty natural. On the Wii, you have to lift the Wii Remote if you like the choice available, or lift the Nunchuk if you don’t. This can take some getting used to, and sometimes you might reject food you didn’t mean to just because you forgot that you were holding the Nunchuk and happened to tilt your hand wrong.

Ratatouille on the Wii makes up for that by improving some of the other mini-games. Peeling a potato was fun on the PlayStation 2 (honestly, it was), but on the Wii it works even better. You’ll feel almost like you’re actually preparing food. There are other options available, too, like picking up tomatoes from a conveyer belt and dropping them into a basket, or frying crepes in a pan. The extra mini-games aren’t always as polished as the ones that are included in both editions of the game, but it is nice to have additional options.

If you own both a PlayStation 2 and a Wii and you’re trying to decide which version to buy or rent, you’re in for a tough choice. When the Wii version is at its best, it really feels great in ways that its worthy competition never does. However, the difficulties with the camera and some mini-games are disappointing. Additional mini-games make up for that, and the load times on the Wii seem to be better to boot, but those weren’t really an issue on the PlayStation 2. Choosing the version you’ll experience is basically painless. Either way, you get to lead an awesome rat through the virtual streets of Paris. Either way, you’re in for a good time.

Rating: 9/10

honestgamer's avatar
Staff review by Jason Venter (July 06, 2007)

Jason Venter founded HonestGamers in 1998, and since then has written hundreds of reviews as the site's editor-in-chief. He also is a prolific freelancer with game reviews, articles and fiction available around the Internet.

More Reviews by Jason Venter
Super Toy Cars (Wii U) artwork
Super Toy Cars (Wii U)

The mini-car racer is still a fun concept, but Super Toy Cars is neither refined enough nor interesting enough to justify your time and money.
Shovel Knight (Wii U) artwork
Shovel Knight (Wii U)

An attempt to revive old school sensibilities that works much better than similar efforts often do.
ReignMaker (PC) artwork
ReignMaker (PC)

It's a real shame the quality of the hybrid gameplay doesn't match the genius of the game's clever title.

Feedback

If you enjoyed this Disney/Pixar Ratatouille review, you're encouraged to discuss it with the author and with other members of the site's community. If you don't already have an HonestGamers account, you can sign up for one in a snap. Thank you for reading!

You must be signed into an HonestGamers user account to leave feedback on this review.

Site Policies & Ethics | Contact | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Disney/Pixar Ratatouille is a registered trademark of its copyright holder. This site makes no claim to Disney/Pixar Ratatouille, its characters, screenshots, artwork, music, or any intellectual property contained within. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.