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Spider-Man: Web of Fire (Sega 32X) artwork

Spider-Man: Web of Fire (Sega 32X) review


"Occasionally, you’ll hear about some nerd who shelled out their life savings on a certain rarity, something that they’ve been hunting down for years and have saved every single penny that they’ve earned so they could purchase this rarity. Now, when I hear about some bum who has burned away a small fortune on a video game, it stupefies me, especially, when the title that they’ve picked up turns out to be an absolute crock. "



Occasionally, you’ll hear about some nerd who shelled out their life savings on a certain rarity, something that they’ve been hunting down for years and have saved every single penny that they’ve earned so they could purchase this rarity. Now, when I hear about some bum who has burned away a small fortune on a video game, it stupefies me, especially, when the title that they’ve picked up turns out to be an absolute crock.

Spiderman: Web of Fire is a classic example. Here is a game that is not only incredibly poor but has chosen to live exclusively on the Sega 32X (the “what?” I hear you say.) These two factors should be enough to deter even the most stubborn of collectors and Spider-man fans alike but when copies rarely surface on e-bay, they are snatched away instantly with oversized price tags slapped across them.

At heart, WoF is a basic platform game where you control everyone’s favourite superhero. With Spider-man in your control, you can climb up walls and ceilings, swing across levels using your wonderful web-slinging abilities and team up with fellow hero, Dare-Devil to fight crime. Spidey can use his classic abilities to tie up enemies, swing across levels, smash down walls and summon DD to appear and wipe the screen of enemies with his baton. Unfortunately, the glitz and glamour from current Spidey games has been shrunken down to its most primitive forms: you can’t pull off any fancy throws with your web, nor can you use it to attack multiple enemies. It can also run out quite quickly, which can leave you in some tight spots, especially when you have to fight more than one foe or reach the far ends of the level.

WoF is severely limited in key areas. Not only is the game incredibly short, it holds no classic Spidey villains for you to duel with and has a combo system that consists of one three-punch combo and a kick. Killing enemies is incredibly dull and samey, (web-stick, punch punch punch) and this monotony is injected with heroin to give you the insanely painful boss battles, which all consist of the above combo stretched out until the muscles in your fingers wear thin. What also cripples your progress in your ability to run out of web in seconds and the fact that the items used to replenish this are few and far between. Once these factors are melted together, they create a rather dull and simple title that does little to entice your senses and works wonders for the repetitive strain injury in your left arm.

Let the fools spend their savings on this poor “spider”-man’s excuse for a superhero game. The more they gobble it up, the less we have to think about it. WOF is a horrible and grossly overrated 32X game that the collectors consider a gem due to its rarity. However, the rest of us (excluding me) can be happy about this and hope that it never surfaces in their local game store, unless you want to laugh at the hefty price tag, which is always a blast.

Rating: 3/10

goldenvortex's avatar
Community review by goldenvortex (December 29, 2005)

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