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Dragon Warrior II

Dragon Warrior II (NES) game cover art
Platform: NES
Genre: Turn-Based RPG
Developer: Chun Soft
AKA: Dragon Quest II: Akuryou no Kamigami (JP)
Publisher
Region
Released
NA
09/??/1990
JP
01/26/1987

Dragon Warrior II (NES) screenshotDragon Warrior II (NES) screenshotDragon Warrior II (NES) screenshot


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Staff Reviews

Dragon Warrior II review

Reviewed December 31, 1969

Jason Venter says: "And so it is that the first few hours of the game are spent growing accustomed to the battle system made famous in the original Dragon Warrior (sans the beautiful backdrop), then getting used to the change as a second warrior joins your party, then adapting yet again when you find the third. It’s a fetch quest of the oddest sort. It’s hard to question the validity of finding others to strengthen your group, yet the game throws curveballs in your face with the frequency of a Yankees pitcher."
honestgamer's avatar

Dragon Warrior II review

Reviewed May 19, 2011

Rob Hamilton says: "Without those rose-colored memories, what we're left with is a decent older RPG that was a marked improvement on the first Dragon Warrior, but more than merely a step behind the third and fourth NES installments. I've played through those two games multiple times. When I picked up Dragon Warrior II a year or two after initially beating it, I think I got about halfway through before losing interest."
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Reader Reviews

Dragon Warrior II review

Reviewed March 11, 2004

icehawk says: "The original Dragon Warrior was about as downgraded as a RPG can get. There weren't a lot of spells, or equipment. The world map was pretty small, and not tons of direction was given. To top it off all the battles were one on one. Enix had a lot to improve upon for their sequel, Dragon Warrior 2. They succeeded in many ways, but a few more problems were also created, keeping it from it's potential. "
icehawk's avatar

Dragon Warrior II review

Reviewed September 14, 2005

psychopenguin says: "It's really amazing how Enix's first two role playing games turned out. The first one, Dragon Warrior, was full of holes and flaws and yet still turned out to be one of the more enjoyable games ever released for the NES. The sequel brought along new ideas and fixed up some of the many flaws found in the original. You would think that this would mean that Dragon Warrior 2 is a better game than its predecessor, but then, what would be so amazing about that? "
psychopenguin's avatar

Dragon Warrior II review

Reviewed December 31, 1969

sgreenwell says: "Overall, Dragon Warrior 2 was a giant step forward from past efforts on the NES. Today, it's hardly a revolutionary game, but it still provides some good fun if you can find a copy."
sgreenwell's avatar

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