Ads are gone. We're using Patreon to raise funds so we can grow. Please pledge support today!
Google+   Facebook button  Twitter button 
3DS | DS | PS3 | PS4 | PSP | VITA | WII | WIIU | X360 | XB1 | All
Line of Fire (Sega Master System) artwork

Line of Fire (Sega Master System) review


"Line Of Fire starts you off infiltrating an enemy base sometime in the future during a conflict probably with a third world county. Inside, Jack discovers a superweapon that could threaten the livelihood of millions all over the globe. However, his foe won't let him waltz off just yet. Seconds after discovering their secret, the elite guards are on Jack immediately. Time to make a great escape. "



Line Of Fire starts you off infiltrating an enemy base sometime in the future during a conflict probably with a third world county. Inside, Jack discovers a superweapon that could threaten the livelihood of millions all over the globe. However, his foe won't let him waltz off just yet. Seconds after discovering their secret, the elite guards are on Jack immediately. Time to make a great escape.

However, the great escape might take a bit longer than expected. For you to safely leave enemy lines, you will have to venture through a jungle, rivers, deserts, and even an enemy fortress. The game starts you off just inside the enemy base where soldiers are already pasting rounds into your transport out of here. Jack is fitted with a well-protected Humm-Vee armed with a machine gun and missile racks. Preliminary enemies are easily defeated with a single shot from your machine gun. They will come in numbers so occasionally, it will be difficult.

As you progress through the level, there will eventually be targets which you'll realize cannot be affected by a few machine gun shots. For one example, gun turrets are built atop tall pillars which regular guns cannot hit. With your supply of missiles, launch one up to hopefully take out that target. Missiles should not be used too often as there is a limited supply. The next level will have helicopters trying to mow you down with machine guns. As air targets, helicopters must be hit with a missile in order for one to be sent wobbling back to Earth in pieces.

You will learn to conserve your missiles though. Unlike your machine gun which has unlimited ammunition, your Humm-Vee's missile rack has a limited amount of rockets ready to be fired. In order to keep going, Jack will have to save his missiles only when he really needs them. As you establish yourself with this game, you'll soon figure out that different enemies can be destroyed using different weapons. It should be pretty obvious, but air targets can only be demolished through use of rockets and ground targets can only be defeated with the machine gun.

While the first few stages are generally easy, the game begins to take a turn for the worse as the border is near. Very noticeably, your trusty Humm-Vee will be replaced by a helicopter. Like the Humm-Vee, this helicopter is armed with machine guns and a missile rack. Basically, the two are the same thing with the exception that one is of course, faster (and if you don't count the visual). As you grow used to this change, you should also notice that the weapon strategy for the Humm-Vee has been reversed! Only ground targets are affected by missiles and other air targets can be taken down with a machine gun.

Using the helicopter, combat becomes much more fast-paced as you race through the enemy skies. Tanks on the ground will attempt to rip you to shreds with powerful rounds. Enemy aircraft will also try to deter your progress with missiles. When the enemy fortress signaling the border of the level appears, your enemies will pretty much try to throw every conceivable bit of weaponry in your direction. However, determination and a little bit of cleverness will eventually throw you over the border into the safety of the DMZ.

Now where's that medal?

Completing Line Of Fire will give you a sense of satisfaction. The satisfaction of outrunning numerous odds usually outnumbering you 1-to-10. The satisfaction of putting hundreds of enemy soldiers where they belong. And of course, the satisfaction of saving the world from a dangerous superweapon. But hey, your name is Jack, and this is your job.

Rating: 8/10

masterzero99's avatar
Community review by masterzero99 (February 04, 2005)

A bio for this contributor is currently unavailable, but check back soon to see if that changes. If you are the author of this review, you can update your bio from the Settings page.

More Reviews by masterzero99
Half-Life (PC) artwork
Half-Life (PC)

When Valve had first released Half Life, the FPS genre was dominated by games such as Quake II and Unreal. Soon thereafter, Half Life rose to stardom, leaving its rivals in the dust, and becoming one of the most effective shooters ever released. But what separated Half Life from the rest of the pack during that era in ...
Hitman: Codename 47 (PC) artwork
Hitman: Codename 47 (PC)

Much of Agent 47's life is shrouded in darkness. His life, limited to the day of his awakening from a deep sleep, is incomplete and mysterious. All that can be recalled is escaping from a damp hospital prison and following a cackling, crazy voice from a man he never knew--his father.
MechAssault (Xbox) artwork
MechAssault (Xbox)

50 feet tall and 100 tons of armor, hydraulics, and nearly every conceivable weapon known to man, the mech is the peak of human warfare. Whether it be rocket pods, pulse lasers, or gauss cannons bringing about the collapse of skyscrapers and even mountains, nothing can stand in a mech's way without being crushed into f...

Feedback

If you enjoyed this Line of Fire review, you're encouraged to discuss it with the author and with other members of the site's community. If you don't already have an HonestGamers account, you can sign up for one in a snap. Thank you for reading!

You must be signed into an HonestGamers user account to leave feedback on this review.

Site Policies & Ethics | Contact | Links

eXTReMe Tracker
© 1998-2014 HonestGamers
None of the material contained within this site may be reproduced in any conceivable fashion without permission from the author(s) of said material. This site is not sponsored or endorsed by Nintendo, Sega, Sony, Microsoft, or any other such party. Line of Fire is a registered trademark of its copyright holder. This site makes no claim to Line of Fire, its characters, screenshots, artwork, music, or any intellectual property contained within. Opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily represent the opinion of site staff or sponsors. Staff and freelance reviews are typically written based on time spent with a retail review copy or review key for the game that is provided by its publisher.